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Thylacine's mysterious die-off explained


Posted on Friday, 16 January, 2009 | Comment icon 1 comment


Image credit: Hobart Zoo
 
"Until recently, little was known about the mysterious Tasmanian tiger, but new DNA sequences of the dog-like marsupial shed light on the striped creature's surprising family tree and its extinction 73 years ago."

  View: Full article |  Source: MSNBC

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Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by PhoenixBird88 on 16 January, 2009, 15:59
Poor Wittle Critters...I want to see one so bad!




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