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NASA plans future Venus mission

Posted on Sunday, 1 August, 2010 | Comment icon 29 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: NASA

 
With interest in Venus increasing NASA are considering ways in which to explore the planet in a future mission.

Scientists have suggested everything from robots to a manned spacecraft in orbit, NASA are expected to hold their first meeting to discuss proposals for a future Venus mission early this month.

"After more than 20 years of neglect, the planet Venus is once more drawing NASA's eye for ambitious new missions."

  View: Full article

 Source: Space.com


  Discuss: View comments (29)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #20 Posted by danielost on 7 August, 2010, 7:42
So your idea is that we drill holes in the pressure hull but we invent solid cameras, solid scientific instruments and solid radio transmitters so they can take the pressure is it. How about this for an alternative, more practice and cheaper idea... how about we just don't drill holes in the pressure hull in the first place? By the way daniel do you realise the sulphuric acid evaporates before it reaches the ground and so does not constitute a problem for a lander don't you? perhaps but it will be on the lander as it goes through the atmo to get there. the polar lander on mars has ice on it's ... [More]
Comment icon #21 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 7 August, 2010, 8:29
perhaps but it will be on the lander as it goes through the atmo to get there. Agreed but that is only for a very short time period and only if it is raining. It invalidates your argument about needing to protect the vehicle from corrosion on the surface. the polar lander on mars has ice on it's legs, not co2 ice. it also snows in the area every night and evaporates when the sun comes up. but the ice on the legs hangs around. You need to learn the difference between evaporation and sublimation. Again think about what you are saying here, because you don't seem to understand the science involve... [More]
Comment icon #22 Posted by ninjadude on 7 August, 2010, 21:53
I had temporarily forgotten about the temperature because of the pressure issue (75-100 atmospheres). The temperature will melt most all electronics (869F). It's amazing that the Venera landers were able to function at all. It is a hell. They had quartz windows so the camera lense would not melt. Did they have any kind of active cooling system? From the Wiki on them the instruments were in a pressure vessel but I don't see reference to any cooling system. Would such a thing work? I still don't see how the proposed robot/rover could move in such a pressure and heat.
Comment icon #23 Posted by danielost on 8 August, 2010, 4:46
Agreed but that is only for a very short time period and only if it is raining. It invalidates your argument about needing to protect the vehicle from corrosion on the surface. You need to learn the difference between evaporation and sublimation. Again think about what you are saying here, because you don't seem to understand the science involved. Why does the snow persist? The simple answer is temperature. The temperature is below the freezing point of water hence the snow remains. Simple elementary science. For the situation on Mars another factor has to be taken into account - surface press... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by danielost on 8 August, 2010, 4:47
I had temporarily forgotten about the temperature because of the pressure issue (75-100 atmospheres). The temperature will melt most all electronics (869F). It's amazing that the Venera landers were able to function at all. It is a hell. They had quartz windows so the camera lense would not melt. Did they have any kind of active cooling system? From the Wiki on them the instruments were in a pressure vessel but I don't see reference to any cooling system. Would such a thing work? I still don't see how the proposed robot/rover could move in such a pressure and heat. a cooling system or a pressu... [More]
Comment icon #25 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 8 August, 2010, 6:40
a cooling system or a pressurization system will add weight to the probe which means less instruments on the probe. Whilst this is true, not sufficiently protecting the instruments from the temperature and pressure means they will fail long before the lander reaches the surface... which is precisely what happened to the early Venera vehicles. Pressure protection is absolutely vital, delicate instruments simply can not survive at 90 atmospheres. Some form of cooling is also essential. For a long duration mission, such as a rover, an active cooling system will be required in order for the missio... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by danielost on 8 August, 2010, 16:18
Whilst this is true, not sufficiently protecting the instruments from the temperature and pressure means they will fail long before the lander reaches the surface... which is precisely what happened to the early Venera vehicles. Pressure protection is absolutely vital, delicate instruments simply can not survive at 90 atmospheres. Some form of cooling is also essential. For a long duration mission, such as a rover, an active cooling system will be required in order for the mission to surive for days rather than hours. There is not much point to a rover if it over heats before it can get anywhe... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 8 August, 2010, 18:22
we are already using solid state instruments. http://millarinstruments.com/products/Telemetry/pressure.php And your point is what exactly? Explain to me how you make a solid state camera, or a solid state instrument for analysing the atmospheric conditions or Venus? Demonstrate the solid state instrument that can analyse soil sample. Can you show me the solid state communications system that can communicate with a passing satellite or with a planet at least 24 million miles away? When you have done that can you please explain to me how a small device designed to be implanted into a lab animal ... [More]
Comment icon #28 Posted by danielost on 9 August, 2010, 2:55
And your point is what exactly? Explain to me how you make a solid state camera, or a solid state instrument for analysing the atmospheric conditions or Venus? Demonstrate the solid state instrument that can analyse soil sample. Can you show me the solid state communications system that can communicate with a passing satellite or with a planet at least 24 million miles away? When you have done that can you please explain to me how a small device designed to be implanted into a lab animal IN ANY WAY compares to a device designed to operate at the surface temperatures and pressures of Venus? res... [More]
Comment icon #29 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 10 August, 2010, 6:39
research and development. micro fibers can be used as cameras So you want to spend vast amounts of money developing new technologies when there are already suitable technologies, just so your can put pointless vents in the pressure vessel do you? Give it up daniel, you've gone way past the point of looking silly now. Fortunately the people that design Venus landers DO have a clue.


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