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Phobos-Grunt tracked in orbit


Posted on Sunday, 8 January, 2012 | Comment icon 4 comments


Image credit: Roscosmos

 
The stricken Russian Mars probe has been photographed in the sky by an amateur astronomer.

The probe was launched last year in the hope of bringing back a sample from Mars' moon Phobos however it failed shortly after launch and has been trapped in orbit ever since. The Russian space agency believes 20-30 pieces of the probe may survive re-entry and crash down to the Earth within the next 9 days or so.

"The failed Russian Mars probe Phobos-Grunt has been pictured moving across the sky by the Paris-based amateur astronomer Thierry Legault."

  View: Full article |  Source: BBC News

  Discuss: View comments (4)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by bpl on 8 January, 2012, 22:20
maybe the marians (not spelled correctly) did it
Comment icon #2 Posted by Muenzenhamster on 10 January, 2012, 13:08
maybe the marians (not spelled correctly) did it Marians? What, like the religious order? What exactly did they do, that you are referring to, anyhow?
Comment icon #3 Posted by bulveye on 10 January, 2012, 19:08
'Marians'? You mean Martians? Or is it a play on words I do not get?
Comment icon #4 Posted by and then on 11 January, 2012, 4:42
Marians? What, like the religious order? What exactly did they do, that you are referring to, anyhow? Perhaps a little less caffeine...


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