Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Mars rover Curiosity landing site narrowed


Posted on Tuesday, 12 June, 2012 | Comment icon 3 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
NASA has narrowed the planned target landing area for when the rover touches down in two months time.

The Curiosity rover is due to land on the surface of Mars in August when it will begin a two-year mission to determine if the planet was ever hospitable to life through a series of complex instruments it will be carrying on board. One of the most important areas to study will be at the foot of a large mountain and by changing the landing site NASA scientists hope to reduce the travel time by half.

The option to do this came about as a result of improved landing precision aboard the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, NASA is confident that the new target area can be reached without overshooting and dropping the rover over the mountains.

"NASA has narrowed the target for its most advanced Mars rover, Curiosity, which will land on the Red Planet in August."

  View: Full article |  Source: NASA

  Discuss: View comments (3)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by pallidin on 12 June, 2012, 11:20
Read the article and found it intriguing. Good luck Curiosity.
Comment icon #2 Posted by grc on 14 June, 2012, 19:17
Read the article and found it intriguing. Good luck Curiosity. Same here. I think though it's time for some humans to take a close look there. I would love to see a human exploration mission on Mars.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Hazzard on 26 June, 2012, 19:05
7 minutes of terror. http://www.space.com...ing-terror.html


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Woman blames car crash on Bigfoot sighting
3-28-2017
An unidentified motorist ended up hitting a deer in her car after being distracted by a 'hairy beast'.
Apollo astronaut: 'ET has never visited us'
3-28-2017
Alan Bean, one of only 12 people to walk on the Moon, doesn't believe we have ever been visited by aliens.
'Maerdy Monster' is new species of millipede
3-28-2017
Scientists in the UK have discovered a previously unknown species of millipede at an old Welsh coal mine.
Australia's own 'Jurassic Park' discovered
3-27-2017
Scientists have identified a site containing thousands of footprints from 21 different dinosaur species.
Other news in this category
Trump signs new bill to send humans to Mars
Posted 3-22-2017 | 11 comments
$19.5 billion has been authorized to support a renewed commitment to NASA's manned space program....
 
Blue fireball lights up the sky over Sweden
Posted 3-21-2017 | 4 comments
People from several towns across the country reported witnessing the spectacle at 9:30pm on Monday night....
 
Stephen Hawking is planning to go in to space
Posted 3-20-2017 | 1 comment
The celebrated physicist has described journeying in to outer space as his 'ultimate ambition'....
 
Mars Base Camp mission could launch by 2028
Posted 3-19-2017 | 2 comments
NASA partner Lockheed Martin is planning an ambitious mission to put astronauts into orbit around Mars....
 
NASA could use the Sun as a magnifying glass
Posted 3-18-2017 | 12 comments
Scientists at JPL have come up with an ambitious new plan to get a better look at extrasolar planets....
 
Older galaxies had a lot less dark matter
Posted 3-18-2017 | 10 comments
Scientists have discovered that dark matter played a much smaller role in galaxies in the early universe....
 
X-37B space plane is nearing orbital record
Posted 3-17-2017 | 3 comments
The US Air Force's mysterious space plane is on track to break the mission duration record of 674 days....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ