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Traces of 2,500-year-old chocolate found

Posted on Saturday, 4 August, 2012 | Comment icon 8 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: André Karwath

 
A plate found in the Yucatan peninsula appears to show traces of ancient chocolate residue.

The find is thought to expand upon the known uses for chocolate in ancient Mexico, in this case as a condiment to spice up a meal. The traces were found by identifying chemical markers on fragments of plate found in the region.

"This is the first time it has been found on a plate used for serving food," said archaeologist Tomas Gallareta. "It is unlikely that it was ground there (on the plate), because for that they probably used metates (grinding stones)."

"Experts have long thought cacao beans and pods were mainly used in pre-Hispanic cultures as a beverage, made either by crushing the beans and mixing them with liquids or fermenting the pulp that surrounds the beans in the pod."

  View: Full article

 Source: Telegraph


  Discuss: View comments (8)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by BrianPotter on 3 August, 2012, 14:43
My heavens...if it lasted 2 and a half minutes in our house,it would have done well..!
Comment icon #2 Posted by Taun on 3 August, 2012, 16:25
It probably would not have been as sweet as today's chocolate... Would it have been more like the kind that is used by bakers and cooks?
Comment icon #3 Posted by rashore on 3 August, 2012, 16:33
I'm going to guess by the way the article reads it's more likely a cooking or unsweetened chocolate.
Comment icon #4 Posted by lizzieboo on 3 August, 2012, 18:17
It was Europeans--either the Swiss or the Belgians, I believe (or was it the Dutch?) who came up with the idea of putting sugar in chocolate. You're correct in stating that it was unsweetened in its use in ancient Central America and Mexico. Whichever of the three countries came up with sweetened chocolate, God bless them. Abundantly and eternally.
Comment icon #5 Posted by King Fluffs on 4 August, 2012, 14:15
Om nom nom.
Comment icon #6 Posted by Darkwind on 4 August, 2012, 14:57
I tried raw cacao bean one time, it was nasty. Upset my stomach, too. I love dark chocolate, but that was a bit too dark.
Comment icon #7 Posted by pallidin on 4 August, 2012, 14:59
Maybe the archaeologist was munching on a stale Hershey's bar whilst digging.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Paracelse on 4 August, 2012, 19:50
mmmmnumm chocolate... wonder if they made any marquise au chocolat back then which is a chocolate cake filled with chocolate mouse (or moose) (even mousse) and covered with a ganache (chocolate frosting made with dark chocolate cream and butter)


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