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NASA unveils their next Mars mission


Posted on Wednesday, 22 August, 2012 | Comment icon 12 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
A new mission planned for 2016 will be the first to take a look at the deep interior of the Red Planet.

The dust from Curiosity's landing has barely settled but NASA is already planning to send another lander to Mars, this time equipped with instruments designed to dig down in to the soil and take measurements underground. Known as InSight, the new spacecraft will be set to determine whether the core of Mars is solid or liquid and why the crust is not divided up in to tectonic plates.

"The exploration of Mars is a top priority for NASA, and the selection of InSight ensures we will continue to unlock the mysteries of the Red Planet and lay the groundwork for a future human mission there," said NASA administrator Charles Bolden.

"NASA has selected a new mission, set to launch in 2016, that will take the first look into the deep interior of Mars to see why the Red Planet evolved so differently from Earth as one of our solar system's rocky planets."

  View: Full article |  Source: NASA

  Discuss: View comments (12)

   


 


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #3 Posted by Karlis on 22 August, 2012, 6:57
The mission, known as InSight, is slated to launch in 2016. It was selected from among three candidate missions for a new Discovery-class science initiative, which are relatively low-cost ($425 million in 2010 dollars, not including the launch vehicle) and targeted to answer specific science questions. In InSight's case, the question is what is inside of Mars. It includes a seismometer, to measure "Marsquakes" if any exist, and a subsurface thermometer to determine how much heat is being released from the planet's core.
Comment icon #4 Posted by DONTEATUS on 22 August, 2012, 14:47
This is really the way to explore,until we find something that wiggles. Then its time to send manned missions.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Rolci on 22 August, 2012, 20:32
"their" next Mars mission? So now it's not ours any more?
Comment icon #6 Posted by notoverrated on 22 August, 2012, 20:44
well none of us made the rockets or rovers.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Emperor470 on 22 August, 2012, 21:31
why do they take so freaken much for each mission more than a decade for them to maybe know if mars's core is solid or liquid? at this pace we'll have a base on mars in about 9999999999999999 years
Comment icon #8 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 23 August, 2012, 10:51
As, like me, you are in the UK, and as I was specifically speaking about NASA then no, it's not ours. The tax payers of the USA paid for it, NOT you and me.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 23 August, 2012, 10:59
Firstly, you can only launch to Mars every 2 years or so, due to the relative positions of the planet. Secondly, each mission has to be built from scratch, tested and calibrated before launch. Thirdly, it then takes nine months to get to Mars. Fourthly, once on Mars the experiments have to be checked before they start collecting data to make sure they are working properly. The experiments then have to be carried out multiple times to ensure that the results are reproducible. Then the data has to be processed. Finally conclusions have to be drawn from the data. It's actually quite... [More]
Comment icon #10 Posted by Hybrid89 on 24 August, 2012, 11:15
I have to agree with one of the above posts. They take far too long. Fair enough im sure they have to prepare in one way or another but could they not do it more efficiently and im not just talking about NASA here. Why not do a Joint world Space program,.....thing lol. Might speed things up AND maybe give us better results.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 25 August, 2012, 22:28
There is a saying in quality control, " quicker, cheaper, better. Pick any two because you can't have all three." NASA learned this the hard way. In the 1990's NASA administrator Daniel Goldin announced a "faster, better, cheaper" policy. Two Mars missions were produced as a result of this policy, the Mars Climate Orbiter and the Mars Polar Lander. And the result of producing these vehicles more quickly... both were lost. Two total failures. So if you want things quicker and better you are going to have to spend vast amounts more. When NASA takes a long time... [More]
Comment icon #12 Posted by aztek on 25 August, 2012, 23:56
yea it takes a lot, and i,m pretty sure it was not just us that made that possible, main booster engine that took the rocket off the earth was build in Russia, and i,m sure some other components were build outside us


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