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Curiosity picks up first scoopful of Mars


Posted on Tuesday, 9 October, 2012 | Comment icon 25 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
NASA's Curiosity rover has used its robotic arm to pick up a scoop of soil from the Martian surface.

It's the first time the rover has collected some of the soil, a video has also been released showing the sample being vibrated inside the scoop to determine its texture and to even off the amount collected. While the initial sample won't be used for analysis, NASA will later pick up another scoop of soil and deliver a small amount to the rover's on-board instruments.

Officials have also detected what appears to be a small bright object on the ground which could potentially be part of the rover itself. An investigation is being carried out to determine if something may have broken off before the mission continues.

"The clip includes 256 frames from Curiosity's Mast Camera, taken at about eight frames per second, plus interpolated frames to run at actual speed in this 32-frames-per-second version."

  View: Full article |  Source: NASA

  Discuss: View comments (25)

   


 


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #16 Posted by Bavarian Raven on 9 October, 2012, 19:30
Actually, on impact craters on earth, they have found dead single-celled life preserved within the melted-sand turned glass... o.O so...it might not be the wrong place to look after all
Comment icon #17 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 9 October, 2012, 19:39
Comment icon #18 Posted by sean6 on 9 October, 2012, 20:08
Comment icon #19 Posted by MaddoxHQ on 9 October, 2012, 23:14
I had my doubts on finding life in the crater myself. Now I have other doubts. If this crater is a supposed 3.5-3.8 BILLION years old.. after looking up a bunch of old craters on earth. Anything that old is completely covered up due to wind and water erosion, and tectonic activity. If we surmise the Martian crater is that old, we also have to guess that Mars has been pretty quiet for 3.5 years. On earth 3.5 billion years ago, it was the Hadean time. Heavy bombardment time, and since that was a system wide time, Mars was also heavily bombarded. I think the chances of finding life are ex... [More]
Comment icon #20 Posted by Zeta Reticulum on 9 October, 2012, 23:27
" NASA's Curiosity rover has used its robotic arm to pick up a scoop of soil from the Martian surface. It's the first time the rover has collected some of the soil, a video has also been released showing the sample being vibrated inside the scoop to determine its texture and to even off the amount collected. While the initial sample won't be used for analysis, NASA will later pick up another scoop of soil and deliver a small amount to the rover's on-board instruments. Officials have also detected what appears to be a small bright object on the ground which could poten... [More]
Comment icon #21 Posted by tipotep on 10 October, 2012, 0:18
Are you trying to confuse me or something If they aren't going to return any samples to earth why did you write ... TiP.
Comment icon #22 Posted by Timonthy on 10 October, 2012, 3:24
I read it as him referring to possible samples being returned on future missions?
Comment icon #23 Posted by stevewinn on 10 October, 2012, 16:59
Yes i read it the same way. - but to be fair to tipotep the reply could lead to confusion if people dont understand the abilities of Curiosity. it only becomes clear without reference waspie was referring to future missions if you understand the abilities of the rover in the first place. all cleared up now so confusion over well played timonthy. im looking forward to see what curiosity discovers. the findings cannot come soon enough. this is the only downside to space exploration, it takes to long.
Comment icon #24 Posted by 27vet on 10 October, 2012, 19:04
Let's hope the "object" is benign if it came from the rover. As far as bringing samples back is concerned, it would not be a big jump from where we are now.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 10 October, 2012, 19:17
It's a bit more complex than you make it seem. Firstly you will need a rover to collect the samples, probably over a 2 year period whilst waiting for the next vehicle to arrive. Then you need to land a second spacecraft, with pin point accuracy, close enough to the rover that the rover can deliver it's payload to the return vehicle. The return vehicle has to launch a capsule from the Martian surface onto a course which will return that capsule to the Earth. A Mars sample return mission is considerably more complex than any mission carried out so far. Both NASA and ESA are working... [More]


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