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Dolphins can stay awake for 15 days at a time

Posted on Friday, 19 October, 2012 | Comment icon 4 comments | News tip by: Still Waters

Image credit: NOAA

Dolphins have the ability to stay awake for weeks by sleeping with one half of their brain at a time.

The unusual technique is vital to their survival as it allows them to stay vigilant and to come up to the surface for air rather than switching off entirely and either drowning or making themselves vulnerable to predators. "These majestic beasts are true unwavering sentinels of the sea," said lead researcher Dr Brian Branstetter.

"The demands of ocean life on air breathing dolphins have led to incredible capabilities, one of which is the ability to continuously, perhaps indefinitely, maintain vigilant behaviour through echolocation."

"Dolphins can stay alert and active for 15 days or more by sleeping with one half of their brain at a time, scientists have learned."

  View: Full article |  Source: Telegraph

  Discuss: View comments (4)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Atlantia on 18 October, 2012, 22:07
But I bet it puts them in a really ****ty mood!
Comment icon #2 Posted by Idano on 19 October, 2012, 13:37
Didn't read the article, don't want to know what they did to these poor creatures
Comment icon #3 Posted by pallidin on 19 October, 2012, 13:50
I know some people that have stayed awake for 15 days though drug abuse.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Hilander on 22 October, 2012, 1:12
Amazing creatures.

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