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Trees very vulnerable to dehydration

Posted on Saturday, 24 November, 2012 | Comment icon 6 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: sxc.hu

 
A new study has revealed that trees live perilously close to the limits of their inner plumbing systems.

Out of several hundred tree species, up to 70 percent live with the risk that a serious drought would prevent water from being transported from their roots to their leaves. Even in wet, tropical regions the trees maintain a precarious balance that if interrupted could prove disastrous. The find emphasizes just how vulnerable our forests are to changes in the climate.

"I think this is a really big deal," said ecologist David Breshears. "We’ve been trying to be careful as a community not to be alarmist [but] our forests are really vulnerable." Given that 30 percent of the Earth's land is covered in forests and the important role that these play in maintaining the environment, it is vital that we do what we can to protect the world's trees while we still have them.

"Trees in most forests, even wet ones, live perilously close to the limits of their inner plumbing systems, a global survey of forests finds."

  View: Full article

 Source: Science News


  Discuss: View comments (6)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by JGirl on 23 November, 2012, 20:45
from the article: (bolding mine) "Seventy percent of the 226 tree species in forests around the world routinely function near the point where a serious drought would stop water transport from their roots to their leaves, says plant physiologist Brendan Choat of the University of Western Sydney in Richmond, Australia" i'm a bit confused by this article. are they suggesting that something must be done? because if the trees routinely function in this manner it means to me at least that they always have. or is the article suggesting we treat the forests better? if so, i think we all got that alrea... [More]
Comment icon #2 Posted by Mnemonix on 23 November, 2012, 20:54
If the trees go, so do we.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Hilander on 23 November, 2012, 23:54
I don't think we can survive without trees, so stop clear cutting.
Comment icon #4 Posted by JGirl on 24 November, 2012, 0:05
I don't think we can survive without trees, so stop clear cutting. i totally agree - many of the products made from wood can be made from other materials in this day and age. this article seems to be suggesting (or at least the title in any case) that there is some peril involved with this 'discovery'. if the trees have always 'done it this way' i do not see the problem. what is the problem they're presenting. that's what i'm not clear on lol
Comment icon #5 Posted by pallidin on 25 November, 2012, 5:47
OK, that's it. I will no longer allow my dog to pee on trees.
Comment icon #6 Posted by Bavarian Raven on 26 November, 2012, 14:46
OK, that's it. I will no longer allow my dog to pee on trees but its good fertilizer for trees/plants


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