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Japan reveals 'Hayabusa2' asteroid mission


Posted on Wednesday, 2 January, 2013 | Comment icon 5 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: JAXA / Akihiro Ikeshita

 
The Japanese space agency has announced a follow-up to their successful Hayabusa spacecraft.

The new mission is expected to launch in 2014 and will target an asteroid called "1999 JU3" in an effort to learn more about the origin and evolution of the solar system. Like its predecessor, Hayabusa2 will attempt to gather samples from the asteroid but this time the team hope to use a "collision device" to produce an artificial crater and sample the less weathered material below the surface.

The spacecraft will take four years to reach its target which means the rendezvous will take place in 2018. It will stay at the asteroid for one-and-a-half years before departing in 2019 and returning home to the Earth by 2020.

"Asteroid Explorer “Hayabusa2” is a successor of “Hayabusa” (MUSES-C), which revealed several new technologies and returned to Earth in June 2010."

  View: Full article |  Source: JAXA

  Discuss: View comments (5)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by 27vet on 2 January, 2013, 19:49
Hope it is successful, following Akatsuki's mishap.
Comment icon #2 Posted by thewild on 2 January, 2013, 23:21
That is awesome. If anyone can do it, it's the Japanese.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 2 January, 2013, 23:36
Actually they don't have a very good record with planetary exploration. Their missions to Mars (Nozomi)and Venus (Akatsuki) have failed and the first Hayabusa probe suffered problems with its ion engines and it's sample collection device. It only managed to return a few grains of asteroid material to the Earth.
Comment icon #4 Posted by King Cobra 1408 on 4 January, 2013, 0:26
i have a question why does it take so long to launch a space exploration mission if our technology is so advanced?other than that i hope its successful and it does beyond well.it would be great to know how the universe did actualy start though.we should send people to mars and the moon already too its been too long i wonder why???
Comment icon #5 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 4 January, 2013, 1:14
Why does having advanced technology mean that everything can be made quickly? Advanced technology is, by it's very nature, complex. It is simple technology that can be designed and built quickly. How long do you think it takes to design, test and make a new type of car or aircraft? The answer is years. Why should it be an different for spacecraft? Each space probe has a unique mission. Each will have unique scientific instruments, You can't simply buy those instruments in the local supermarket.


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