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Lost items reveal Roman bath activities


Posted on Monday, 8 April, 2013 | Comment icon 5 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: CC 3.0 Elgaard

 
Roman artifacts recovered from the drains of public baths have revealed new insights in to their history.

To those who had access to them in ancient Rome, the baths were a place not just to wash but also to socialize with others in the community. Artifacts such as food remains and sewing needles recovered from these buildings have revealed that some of the people who went there engaged in activities aside from bathing. At one site archaeologists even found a scalpel lodged down a drain indicating that medical procedures may have been carried out there.

"For the Romans, the baths weren't just a place to get clean, but this larger social center where a variety of activities were taking place," said study researcher Alissa Whitmore.

"Ever go swimming with rings on your fingers or hoops in your ears only to find your jewelry had vanished after your dip? If so, you've got something in common with ancient Romans."

  View: Full article |  Source: Live Science

  Discuss: View comments (5)

   


 
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Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Hilander on 7 April, 2013, 16:10
There was a lot of hanky panky going on in these baths too. So I imagine things were lost besides jewelry.
Comment icon #2 Posted by moonshadow60 on 8 April, 2013, 17:38
It's mind boggling that so much has survived for that long, in many cases before the time of Christ.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Lady Kasey on 8 April, 2013, 22:02
Comment icon #4 Posted by regeneratia on 8 April, 2013, 22:54
Wow, thank you for bringing this to my attention. I have apps that cover this kind of thing. Just been too busy.
Comment icon #5 Posted by highdesert50 on 9 April, 2013, 0:59
It seems as though these baths were an important part of hygiene and socializing. I suppose the powers in control change, but one would think that these baths would have proliferated rather than diminished in popularity over time.


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