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Minoan civilization originated in Europe


Posted on Saturday, 18 May, 2013 | Comment icon 47 comments | News tip by: docyabut2


Image credit: CC 2.0 George Groutas

 
New DNA evidence has suggested that the ancient Minoans may not have originated in Egypt at all.

When Sir Arthur Evans discovered the Palace of Minos on Crete in 1900, he determined that the artifacts left behind by the Minoans seemed to set them apart from the Bronze-Age Greeks and were likely to have instead originated in Northern Egypt. New research has now cast doubt on this hypothesis however because DNA recovered from caves on Crete suggests that the Minoans had descended from early farmers who settled on the island thousands of years earlier.

"For the last 30, 40 years thereís been a growing sense that Minoan Crete was created by people indigenous to the island," said archaeologist Cyprian Broodbank. "Itís good to have some of the old assumptions that Minoans migrated from some other high culture scotched."

"The Minoans flourished on Crete for as many as 12 centuries until about 1,500 bc, when it is thought to have been devastated by a catastrophic eruption of the Mediterranean island volcano Santorini, and a subsequent tsunami."

  View: Full article |  Source: Nature.com

  Discuss: View comments (47)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #38 Posted by The Puzzler on 20 May, 2013, 4:41
Fair enough. Maybe direct at them next time. Yes, I'm wondering. So they said Kreta on his arrival, we know that much. They then named the island Krete/Crete from that. It could be the people of Crete spoke an intelligible language, being an early IE language, but not actually the same language as Minno. This is interesting, to me: However a diphthong is by definition two vowels united into a single sound and therefore might be typed as just V. because that's what I said the word SVN was - actually a form of Dutch zoon/son - a V might take the place of 2 vowels in the words where... [More]
Comment icon #39 Posted by Abramelin on 20 May, 2013, 6:21
No, the people uttered cries on Minno's arrival. Those cries or screams are "KRETA" in OLB-ish, or KRETEN in Dutch. Btw, the singular in Middle Dutch (and no doubt in OLB-ish too...) is CRETE/KRETE .
Comment icon #40 Posted by Frank Merton on 20 May, 2013, 6:43
Drawing any sort of conclusion, or even hypothesis, from a few linguistic similarities, is not persuasive.
Comment icon #41 Posted by Abramelin on 20 May, 2013, 6:46
You tell me, lol. But that's what the OLB is largely based on, folk etymology.
Comment icon #42 Posted by The Puzzler on 20 May, 2013, 8:01
Maybe not persuasive but certainly interesting. How did Crete get it's name? Maybe you've got a more persuasive answer. Also to Abe: The current name of Crete first appears in as ke-re-si-jo "Cretan" in texts. In , the name Crete (Κρήτη) first appears in 's .[sup] [/sup] Its etymology is unknown. One speculative proposal derives it from a hypothetical word *kursatta (cf. kursawar "island", kursattar "cutting, sliver").[sup] [/sup] In , it became Creta. If anything else, Crete might be named for the type of ... [More]
Comment icon #43 Posted by Frank Merton on 20 May, 2013, 8:27
I saw a monograph once where the author had taken Finnish and Iroquois and compiled a list of over a hundred remarkable similarities. Not straight synonyms, but words close enough in meaning to be relatable. (Like "forest" in one language and "wood" in the other). Does this mean the Finno-Ugaritic languages and whatever group Iroquois is part of are somehow connected? The point of the exercise was to show that one can do this sort of thing with any two given languages. From this one concludes that the existence of individual similarities is meaningless -- not even &quo... [More]
Comment icon #44 Posted by The Puzzler on 20 May, 2013, 8:32
As both are IE languages (meaning specifically Linear B/Greek and Frisian) they will connect, it's just a matter of connecting the right etymology in the correct context to find what language it is. As the Wiki site said and I bolded: Its etymology is unknown
Comment icon #45 Posted by The Puzzler on 20 May, 2013, 8:36
That's what I like to do to solve the puzzles, some call it lego-linguistics, whatever, I don't see them coming up with any alternatives... Remind me of people who whine about everything and when you say "well what do you think could be a solution?" they say "I dunno...". Atlas is a good example and I've followed enough words to see the pattern. When a words etymology is unknown, the language it originated in remains unknown. If the etymology can be figured out, it's likely the parent language will become known. I can make what I like out of Atlas and it&#... [More]
Comment icon #46 Posted by Echosignal on 22 May, 2013, 13:52
Hello everyone! There is an ancient Greek myth about ''Kourites'' (Κουρήτες). Kourites were the first inhabitants of Crete. Heracles (not the known demigod), Epimedes, Peonios, Iasios and Idas. It is speculated that ''Kourites'' is the origin of the word Crete. ''Crete'' in Greek, is (Κρήτη) Kriti. Kourites = Krites (Cretans - the residents of Crete) = Kriti. It makes sense, but then again it is just a speculation as I previously mentioned. Here is a link with some in... [More]
Comment icon #47 Posted by Frank Merton on 28 May, 2013, 6:46
One says, "I dunno" when one doesn't know and when the evidence strikes one as unconvincing and just guesswork. The threshold between accepting something as true and seeing it as only an interesting possibility is subtle and is going to be different for each person. Since I have childhood knowledge of several languages, I am well aware of the phenomenon of "false friends," words that indicate they mean one thing but in fact don't -- linguistic similarities that can lead one all over the place and achieve nothing.


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