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26 black holes found in neighboring galaxy


Posted on Saturday, 15 June, 2013 | Comment icon 8 comments | News tip by: Waspie Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
Astronomers have indentified an unprecedented number of black holes in the Andromeda galaxy.

NASA has combined more than 150 observations from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory spread across 13 years to identify the largest number of black hole candidates within a single galaxy to date. These particular black holes are likely to have been formed by the collapse of stars up to 10 times the mass of our Sun.

"While we are excited to find so many black holes in Andromeda, we think it's just the tip of the iceberg," said astrophysicist Robin Barnard.

"Using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have discovered an unprecedented bonanza of black holes in the Andromeda Galaxy, one of the nearest galaxies to the Milky Way."

  View: Full article |  Source: NASA

  Discuss: View comments (8)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by SneakyOrb on 15 June, 2013, 14:13
"Many consider Andromeda to be a sister galaxy to the Milky Way. The two ultimately will collide, several billion years from now.."i'm glad it won't be in my life time
Comment icon #2 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 15 June, 2013, 15:19
i'm glad it won't be in my life time Even if it was you wouldn't notice a thing. The distance between stars is so great that the chances of any physical contact is virtually zero.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Boss-Hog on 15 June, 2013, 16:17
but there's always that 1 in... chance
Comment icon #4 Posted by Horus Christos on 15 June, 2013, 18:07
The average distance between stars is 160 billion (1.6×1011) km (100 billion mi). That is analogous to one ping-pong ball every 3.2 km (2.0 mi). Thus, it is extremely unlikely that any two stars would collide when the two galaxies merge. Much more likely is that our solar system would be ejected entirely out of the newly merged galaxy due to coming to close to s black hole. Don't worry though, we'll be long gone from earth in 4 billion years anyway...the sun's increasing luminosity will fry the earth in about 1.5 billion years...assuming that global warming doesn't do the job first.
Comment icon #5 Posted by ashven on 15 June, 2013, 19:23
Can anyone recommend further reading on black holes as I'm wondering what hard evidence we have as to what they are?
Comment icon #6 Posted by WoIverine on 15 June, 2013, 21:24
Maybe we'll find all those missing socks and tv remotes.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Sundew on 16 June, 2013, 13:16
Can anyone recommend further reading on black holes as I'm wondering what hard evidence we have as to what they are? Can't name any off the top of my head, however you should be able to find many resources online with a search engine. Current theories are that black holes are the remnants of massive stars whose primary fuel supply has run out, allowing gravity to overwhelm atomic fusion. Gravity causes the star to collapse and the matter therein becomes so dense that not even light can escape from it beyond a certain radius (called the event horizon). Somewhere at the center of the collapsed s... [More]
Comment icon #8 Posted by ashven on 17 June, 2013, 19:58
Thanks Sundew I really appreciate that explanation especially as it was concise,I have very little time to read so that was very helpful,cheers


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