Thursday, February 23, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Can global warming be reversed ?


Posted on Friday, 12 July, 2013 | Comment icon 75 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: sxc.hu

 
Climate researchers have been investigating possible ways to reverse the effects of global warming.

According to a recent study, it should be possible to effectively reverse climate change by building special bio-energy plants that can filter carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and deposit it within old gas wells. It would be a slow process but it could be done, potentially lowering global temperatures by as much as 0.6 degrees Celsius every hundred years.

"It’s like drilling for natural gas, but in reverse," said study co-author Niclas Mattson. "The first combined full-scale power plants will probably be here within a decade, so it will take several decades for this to become significant on a global scale."

"Hi-tech new bio-energy plants could “reverse” global warming by pumping carbon dioxide into old gas wells - lowering temperatures by 0."

  View: Full article |  Source: Yahoo! News

  Discuss: View comments (75)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #66 Posted by Br Cornelius on 22 July, 2013, 15:49
I'm no expert by any stretch of the word. I generally avoid the debates on climate change because I am not that knowledgeable and I have an unusual viewpoint on the whole affair. @BR Cornelius. To my understanding, the problem that comes with improving battery life and efficiency is that in order to do that, it requires new levels of industrialization that can be just as polluting and damaging to the environment. Rare element mining and then the refining ends up pumping as much pollution and toxins in the environment as the common energy production methods...so it is a lose-lose. I have nothin... [More]
Comment icon #67 Posted by Frank Merton on 22 July, 2013, 16:04
To my general view there are several categories of problems. First there are technological hurdles, and I see so many possible possibilities on the horizon that something will work out -- even if we see a reduction in global living standards for awhile (not a minor thing to the poor who get hit hardest). More important are economic problems; those of entrenched industries using their turf and their patents and so on to prevent the arrival of new technologies. Finally there are political hurdles -- civil unrest and behaviors by states to protest their advantages at the expense of other states/
Comment icon #68 Posted by Doug1o29 on 22 July, 2013, 18:03
I still contend that hydrogen just will not be able to compete with any of these options. Hydrogen is only one component of the mix and for the most-part, doesn't have to compete at all. One could also store surplus wind energy by pumping water uphill into a reservoir and generating power with it when the wind isn't blowing. At any rate, I intend to give this some serious study. Doug
Comment icon #69 Posted by Br Cornelius on 22 July, 2013, 18:16
Hydrogen is only one component of the mix and for the most-part, doesn't have to compete at all. One could also store surplus wind energy by pumping water uphill into a reservoir and generating power with it when the wind isn't blowing. At any rate, I intend to give this some serious study. Doug Pumped storage is a proven technology with huge potential for expansion. Coupled with HVDC grids this allows whole continent renewables networks with storage at optimum nodes. The EU has an active policy to create such a HVDC grid with the aim of greatest renewables diversity. It is also a massive ince... [More]
Comment icon #70 Posted by Doug1o29 on 23 July, 2013, 13:12
the problem with batteries so far is that they have been open cycle Hydrogen does not require batteries, except starter batteries for the engines that burn the hydrogen. Engines that can remain permanently connected to the grid don't need batteries at all. The basic fact is that personal petrochemical transport will become unaffordable in the next few decades, the world of transport will be divided up between long distance public transport, hire cars for one off long distance journeys and EV's for everything else. The status quo is not affordable or sustainable. I am ready to buy an electric v... [More]
Comment icon #71 Posted by Br Cornelius on 23 July, 2013, 14:37
Hydrogen does not require batteries, except starter batteries for the engines that burn the hydrogen. Engines that can remain permanently connected to the grid don't need batteries at all. I am ready to buy an electric vehicle as soon as they come up with one that is affordable, efficient enough to amortize its cost in a reasonable amount of time and has a range of at least 350 miles - a Prius does not fill the bill. But even then, I will need a different vehicle to go visit my mother who lives 1100 miles from here. I suspect that electric vehicles for a trip like that would be very expensive ... [More]
Comment icon #72 Posted by Doug1o29 on 23 July, 2013, 19:16
My concern with Hydrogen is that it is so reactive it damages the bonds within the containment medium. It is only an efficient storer of energy when compressed to a liquid because it has a relatively low energy density as a gas and so requires huge volumes of storage (very expensive) to contain. As described in the article I linked to, it is both unavoidable and necessary to vent a certain amount of the hydrogen for it to remain in safe state - which means that cannot be considered as anything other than a short term buffer, and an inefficient one at that. The real issue is that its a massivel... [More]
Comment icon #73 Posted by Calibeliever on 16 September, 2013, 17:08
Please say why he is wrong. (I'm not saying he is right, but your assertion warrants an explanation.). Nah, I did it on purpose. Deniers aren't required to site facts, they get to just say "no it isn't". I thought I'd try it for a change. Felt kinda good
Comment icon #74 Posted by Harte on 16 September, 2013, 23:56
No it didn't. Harte
Comment icon #75 Posted by Frank Merton on 17 September, 2013, 2:01
With the internet I think the need to travel to and from office-type work could be eliminated if governments got serious about it and began penalizing companies for dragging their heals on the subject. A lot of travel for sales and meetings could also be more strongly discouraged.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
7 Earth-sized worlds found around nearby star
2-22-2017
NASA has announced the discovery of seven new planets including three within their star's habitable zone.
Scientists finally solve 'ketchup problem'
2-22-2017
It's a question that has puzzled mankind for years - how do you get every drop of sauce out of the bottle?
Amazing 'fire rainbow' spotted over Singapore
2-22-2017
The breathtaking natural phenomenon was photographed by dozens of people on Monday afternoon.
Mystery surrounds Europe radiation spike
2-21-2017
An unexplained spike in radiation was picked up across a number of European countries last month.
Other news in this category
Scientists finally solve 'ketchup problem'
Posted 2-22-2017 | 8 comments
It's a question that has puzzled mankind for years - how do you get every drop of sauce out of the bottle?...
 
Amazing 'fire rainbow' spotted over Singapore
Posted 2-22-2017 | 6 comments
The breathtaking natural phenomenon was photographed by dozens of people on Monday afternoon....
 
Mystery surrounds Europe radiation spike
Posted 2-21-2017 | 27 comments
An unexplained spike in radiation was picked up across a number of European countries last month....
 
Ship set to be deliberately trapped in ice
Posted 2-20-2017 | 3 comments
Scientists are planning to sail a research vessel to the Arctic so it can get stuck in the ice on purpose....
 
Scientists aim to harness power of volcanoes
Posted 2-18-2017 | 4 comments
Efforts are underway in Iceland to find ways of turning the heat from volcanoes in to usable electricity....
 
Is Zealandia the world's eighth continent ?
Posted 2-18-2017 | 43 comments
Despite being almost entirely submerged by the sea, Zealandia could soon be recognized as a continent....
 
Scientists revive 10,000-year-old life forms
Posted 2-18-2017 | 14 comments
In a remarkable breakthrough, microbes trapped inside cave crystals have been brought back to life....
 
Woolly mammoth 'on the verge of resurrection'
Posted 2-16-2017 | 15 comments
Scientists believe that an elephant-mammoth hybrid embryo could be created within as little as two years....
 
Amazing bipedal robot could deliver your mail
Posted 2-11-2017 | 9 comments
Agility Robotics has developed an incredible new robot called Cassie that can walk just like a human....
 
Smog is more toxic in Europe than in China
Posted 2-10-2017 | 11 comments
Air pollution in Europe and North America may be 27 times more toxic than the smog over Chinese cities....
 
Blue tarantulas lead to color breakthrough
Posted 2-9-2017 | 2 comments
The unusual hue of certain tarantulas has been helping scientists develop vibrant new 3D-printed colors....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ