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Is teleportation really possible ?

Posted on Wednesday, 31 July, 2013 | Comment icon 26 comments


Image credit: Paramount Pictures

 
Physics students have calculated the time it would take to teleport someone between two points.

A staple of science fiction series 'Star Trek', the ability to teleport someone from one point in space to another is something that many believe to be impossible due to the amount of energy needed and because it is questionable whether or not a human could actually survive such a trip. Now four physics students at the University of Leicester have thrown a further spanner in the works by attempting to calculate just how long it would take to cycle through a single teleport.

Assuming that the teleportation process would require a person to be represented as transferable data, the total amount of bits needed would add up to a number 43 digits long. Communicating this data to the target location would then take an estimated 4,850,000,000,000,000 years, equivalent to 350,000 times the entire age of the universe.

"Four University of Leicester physics students published a paper in the School’s Journal of Physics Special Topics explaining that the energy required to teleport one person is shown to be dependent on bandwidth, meaning a decrease in time creates an increase in power consumption."

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 Source: Red Orbit


  Discuss: View comments (26)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #17 Posted by sepulchrave on 1 August, 2013, 16:57
A data burst could handle it. What? The bandwidth of a communications channel has an upper limit. When regular communications approaches the bandwidth of the channel, a data burst can reduce the transmission time by increasing the data compression (i.e. omitting data, assuming that reconstruction techniques at the other end can reproduce it). I don't even think teleported data can be compressed without destroying the entanglement. Some futuristic communications channel may have a much higher bandwidth than existing channels, sure. But again, that doesn't affect the predictions made in the orig... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by danielost on 1 August, 2013, 23:42
I wouldn't want someone to have the power to remove what ever cells they wanted.
Comment icon #19 Posted by Harte on 2 August, 2013, 1:17
I wonder if something like this could be used to leave out cancer cells when reconstructing someone? In Larry Niven's "A World Out of Time" (I believe it was,) the hero notices after being bitten by a cat that his gray hair is disappearing. He's been using teleportation "pads" too, and one such device transported him to another pad that was beside it. He thought the cat bite (it was millions of years in the future, and the cat was legless, crawling like a snake) was the key to his new youth. Turned out the tele pad reset his telomeres and removed all the wastes, etc. from his body. Harte
Comment icon #20 Posted by danielost on 2 August, 2013, 1:34
Imagine the government using this on the convicted. They could go in and remove all the cells causeing him to be evil. The convict would be somene else.
Comment icon #21 Posted by Whatsinausername on 2 August, 2013, 5:16
Imagine the government using this on the convicted. They could go in and remove all the cells causeing him to be evil. The convict would be somene else. I'm pretty sure the convict would be dead.
Comment icon #22 Posted by rsanchez on 8 August, 2013, 4:00
Zeno's Paradox in teleportation form.
Comment icon #23 Posted by The Exodia on 8 August, 2013, 8:23
yeah it does. but not by humans. mostly the time shifter person. thats all. the possibility to explain to you is to highly private and it would be sound impossible to humans. so its best to shut it and let the pros do what they do.
Comment icon #24 Posted by Aggie on 22 September, 2013, 8:03
Comment icon #25 Posted by StarMountainKid on 23 September, 2013, 14:59
There are also unavoidable errors in communications, sending data from one location to another. There is always a segment of noise within the data transfer. It's interesting that this segment of noise contains data, and within this data there is another segment of noise again, and within this noise there is a portion of data, etc. All this becoming smaller and smaller segments of the communication. Communications technology is designed to retrieve this data from these portions of noise. Even so, I think the teleportation of a human being would always contain unpredictable errors. You would nev... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by Render on 5 October, 2013, 11:49
The trouble with teleportation: It could take quadrillions of years Bad news, "Star Trek" fans: Even if you found a way to teleport a human being, sending the required data would take longer than the age of the universe. At least that's what fourth-year physics students from the University of Leicester concluded in the latest of a series of studies on way-out topics. http://www.nbcnews.com/science/trouble-teleportation-it-could-take-quadrillions-years-6C10817487


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