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Stonehenge: the true story



Documentary covering the story of the ancient and enigmatic Stonehenge situated in Wiltshire, England.

   

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Recent comments on this video
Comment icon #14 Posted by The Puzzler on 25 June, 2012, 9:55
Great job Will Maybe we will see your documentries on TV in the future, it's great to see young people interested in archaeology and history, good on you! Did you film the footage? Have you been to Stonehenge?
Comment icon #15 Posted by Will Carothers on 25 June, 2012, 20:23
I only wish I could have been, but no. I found some of the footage on line, and i edited it to fit. I do hope to visit it one day though!
Comment icon #16 Posted by The Puzzler on 26 June, 2012, 0:13
I only wish I could have been, but no. I found some of the footage on line, and i edited it to fit. I do hope to visit it one day though! Great work on the film editing then. Me too!
Comment icon #17 Posted by Likely Guy on 26 June, 2012, 1:18
A visit to Stonehenge is actually a tad depressing. You can't get within 150 feet of the stones, except on the solstice. You walk around the site (in a circle of course, with a few hundred other people) on these green rubber mats listening to an automated tour guide (like a cell phone) and you punch in the number of the site that you're at; "If you happen to be at this position on a spring equinox, blah, blah, blah..." By the way Will, great video! Keep up the good work.
Comment icon #18 Posted by The Puzzler on 26 June, 2012, 1:37
A visit to Stonehenge is actually a tad depressing. You can't get within 150 feet of the stones, except on the solstice. You walk around the site (in a circle of course, with a few hundred other people) on these green rubber mats listening to an automated tour guide (like a cell phone) and you punch in the number of the site that you're at; "If you happen to be at this position on a spring equinox, blah, blah, blah..." By the way Will, great video! Keep up the good work. lol fair enough, my Mum and Dad visited it years ago when you could walk right up to it but I can imagine the sterile touris... [More]
Comment icon #19 Posted by cormac mac airt on 26 June, 2012, 3:04
lol fair enough, my Mum and Dad visited it years ago when you could walk right up to it but I can imagine the sterile tourist conditions today! I don't remember it being such a sterile event, such as Likely Guy mentioned, when I was there in 1983. But yes, it was a bit disappointing since I was expecting something grander in scale. But in any case at least I can say I've seen it in person. cormac
Comment icon #20 Posted by Likely Guy on 26 June, 2012, 3:43
I don't remember it being such a sterile event, such as Likely Guy mentioned, when I was there in 1983. But yes, it was a bit disappointing since I was expecting something grander in scale. But in any case at least I can say I've seen it in person. cormac Hey there cormac. I was there 12, 14(?) years ago. I wasn't trying to describe it as sterile per se, just disappointing. When you travel over 4,700 miles to get there and you can't get within the last few feet, it's a bit of a downer.This is, of course, to protect the stones from either wanton vandalism and also harm from the more innocent ki... [More]
Comment icon #21 Posted by cormac mac airt on 26 June, 2012, 6:56
Hey there cormac. I was there 12, 14(?) years ago. I wasn't trying to describe it as sterile per se, just disappointing. When you travel over 4,700 miles to get there and you can't get within the last few feet, it's a bit of a downer.This is, of course, to protect the stones from either wanton vandalism and also harm from the more innocent kind, i.e. the wear and tear of millions of hands over thousands of years. Stones are not truely as tough as we believe.I did come away with a free souvenir though. It's a small piece of whitish flint, originally from a small boulder, that the builders used ... [More]
Comment icon #22 Posted by The Puzzler on 26 June, 2012, 14:10
I don't remember it being such a sterile event, such as Likely Guy mentioned, when I was there in 1983. But yes, it was a bit disappointing since I was expecting something grander in scale. But in any case at least I can say I've seen it in person. cormac Cool, they travelled 80's and early 90's, and they did get a piece of stone from the Parthenon, now if my Mum just knew where it was....I didn't give much of a toss about the Parthenon back then, now I'd love to have it.
Comment icon #23 Posted by Likely Guy on 30 June, 2012, 6:30
Cool, they travelled 80's and early 90's, and they did get a piece of stone from the Parthenon, now if my Mum just knew where it was....I didn't give much of a toss about the Parthenon back then, now I'd love to have it. Thus, the relevance of history. In the early 90's a friend of mine gave me a golf ball sized chunk of the Berlin Wall. Flat on one side with yellow and red spray paint.


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