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Britain used Indian troops as guinea pigs


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Britain used Indian troops as guinea pigs

2 Sep 2007, 0001 hrs IST,Rashmee Roshan Lall ,TNN

LONDON: Indian soldiers serving under the British Raj were used as guinea pigs to test the effects of poison gases on humans by scientists from the world's oldest chemical warfare research installation here in the UK, according to newly-released archival documents.

The Indian soldiers suffered severe burns from the gas as part of the trials, which started in the early 1930s and lasted almost through to Indian independence.

The trials were part of a study by British scientists to ascertain if the poison gas inflicted greater damage on coloured skins than on white Caucasians. The scientists had been posted to the Indian sub-continent to develop poison gases to use against the Japanese.

Several-hundred Indians were part of the trials, according to documents released by the UK's National Archives. It is unclear if the Indians were told about the potentially serious medical implications of the trials before they were sent into the gas chambers by the scientists from Porton Down, the UK's chemical warfare research laboratory.

Full story from The Times of India

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Britain used Indian troops as guinea pigs

2 Sep 2007, 0001 hrs IST,Rashmee Roshan Lall ,TNN

LONDON: Indian soldiers serving under the British Raj were used as guinea pigs to test the effects of poison gases on humans by scientists from the world's oldest chemical warfare research installation here in the UK, according to newly-released archival documents.

The Indian soldiers suffered severe burns from the gas as part of the trials, which started in the early 1930s and lasted almost through to Indian independence.

The trials were part of a study by British scientists to ascertain if the poison gas inflicted greater damage on coloured skins than on white Caucasians. The scientists had been posted to the Indian sub-continent to develop poison gases to use against the Japanese.

Several-hundred Indians were part of the trials, according to documents released by the UK's National Archives. It is unclear if the Indians were told about the potentially serious medical implications of the trials before they were sent into the gas chambers by the scientists from Porton Down, the UK's chemical warfare research laboratory.

Full story from The Times of India

why am i not suprised to read that.

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Britain used Indian troops as guinea pigs

2 Sep 2007, 0001 hrs IST,Rashmee Roshan Lall ,TNN

LONDON: Indian soldiers serving under the British Raj were used as guinea pigs to test the effects of poison gases on humans by scientists from the world's oldest chemical warfare research installation here in the UK, according to newly-released archival documents.

The Indian soldiers suffered severe burns from the gas as part of the trials, which started in the early 1930s and lasted almost through to Indian independence.

The trials were part of a study by British scientists to ascertain if the poison gas inflicted greater damage on coloured skins than on white Caucasians. The scientists had been posted to the Indian sub-continent to develop poison gases to use against the Japanese.

Several-hundred Indians were part of the trials, according to documents released by the UK's National Archives. It is unclear if the Indians were told about the potentially serious medical implications of the trials before they were sent into the gas chambers by the scientists from Porton Down, the UK's chemical warfare research laboratory.

Full story from The Times of India

I would like to point out that British Soldiers were also subjected to the same Guinea Pig trials. Additionally british Soldiers were used as gunea pigs in Radiation efects testing

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Well they single handedly forced hundreds of Hindus and Muslims to go against their won teachings, i wouldn't put THIS past teh east india company.

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I would like to point out that British Soldiers were also subjected to the same Guinea Pig trials. Additionally british Soldiers were used as gunea pigs in Radiation efects testing

i was aware of the british test subjects. i thought the article was highlighting the silly notion that skin colour would make a difference in suceptability to the gas.

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Well they single handedly forced hundreds of Hindus and Muslims to go against their won teachings, i wouldn't put THIS past teh east india company.

The east India compamy was dissolved in 1874 so is not responsible for this.

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i was aware of the british test subjects. i thought the article was highlighting the silly notion that skin colour would make a difference in suceptability to the gas.

It was, I believe, to test the absorption of the various chemicals through the skin where there was a higher concentration of melanin. Still disgraceful and barbaric by todays standards.

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no matter who was a guinea pig , when or where . it's still a disgrace.

want to test something ? use yourself first or don't do it at all. and try asking if those want to be tested on and explain why , how and effects. I bet no one in thier right mind would step forward.

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