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Syria backs possible Turkish invasion


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Well perhaps you should have thought about that before you supported turning Iraq into a warzone in the powder keg that is that region.

Should have thought of what?

I had no control of how the Ottomon Empire was divided, nor did I have control over the signing of the Treaty of Lausanne, rejecting an independent Kurdistan. Nor did I have control over the military conflicts between the Kurds, Turks, Persian and Arabs over the past 100 years, including conflicts up to the moment of the US invasion (yes, the Turks did enter Iraqi Kurdistan during Saddam Hussien's reign).

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Should have thought of what?

I had no control of how the Ottomon Empire was divided, nor did I have control over the signing of the Treaty of Lausanne, rejecting an independent Kurdistan. Nor did I have control over the military conflicts between the Kurds, Turks, Persian and Arabs over the past 100 years, including conflicts up to the moment of the US invasion (yes, the Turks did enter Iraqi Kurdistan during Saddam Hussien's reign).

Yes and given what you know about the fragility of the situation, you still can't see how turning Iraq into a virtual free for all could have dire consequences?

Come on now Bruce :hmm:

This should have been thought of well ahead of time.

And somehow I doubt that Bush lacks the diplomatic skills to prevent something horrible from happening.

Edited by Bob26003
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So what should we do oh wise Bruce?

Bomb Turkey? Bomb Syria?

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What do you expect when you destroy the Gov and infrastructure of a nation...

The Iraqi government has not been involved with Kurdish Iraq since 1991.

Then following several bloody clashes between Iraqi forces and Kurdish troops, an uneasy and shaky balance of power was reached, and the Iraqi government withdrew its military and other personnel from the region in October 1991. At the same time, Iraq imposed an economic blockade over the region, reducing its oil and food supplies.[21] The region thus gained de facto independence, being ruled by the two principal Kurdish parties – the Kurdish Democratic Party and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan – outside the control of Baghdad. The region has its own flag and National Anthem. (SOURCE)

Kurdistan is the one stable and prosperous region of Iraq since the fall of Baghdad.

Following the removal of Saddam Hussein's administration and the subsequent violence, the three provinces fully under the Kurdistan Regional Government's control were the only three in Iraq to be ranked "secure" by the US military. The relative security and stability of the region has allowed the KRG to sign a number of investment contracts with foreign companies. In 2006 the first new oil well since the invasion of Iraq was drilled in the Kurdistan region by the Norwegian energy company DNO. Initial indications are that the oil field contains at least 100 million barrels of oil and will be pumping 5,000 bpd by early 2007. The KRG has signed exploration agreements with two other oil companies, Canada's Western Oil Sands and the UK's Sterling Energy.

The stability of the Kurdistan region has allowed it to achieve a higher level of development than other regions in Iraq. In 2004 the per capita income was 25% higher than in the rest of Iraq. Two international airports at Arbil and Sulaimaniya both operate flights to Middle Eastern and European destinations. The government continues to receive a portion of the revenue from Iraq's oil exports, and the government will soon implement a unified foreign investment law. The KRG also has plans to build a media city in Arbil and free trade zones near the borders of Turkey and Iran.

Since 2003, the stronger economy of Kurdistan has attracted around 20,000 Arab workers from the rest of Iraq to seek jobs in Iraqi Kurdistan.[21] According to Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, since 2003 the number of millionaires in the Kurdish city of Silêmani has increased from 12 to 2000, reflecting the financial and economic growth of the region.[22] (SOURCE)

Once again, facts are on my side.

You cannot win this Bob. Go ahead and post another one of your uneducated, ignorant, thoughtless, knee-jerk posts.

Edited by BrucePrime
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bobs hatred for bush has blinded him....what does bush have to do with a turkish incursion...thats the last thing he wants....

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Turkey Urges U.S. to Seize PKK Rebels to Prevent Raid

Turkey called on U.S. forces to seize Kurdish fighters in northern Iraq, as the Iraqi government warned against a Turkish invasion of the oil-rich region.

The U.S. should extradite the militants to Turkey to help prevent an attack on the rebels' bases in neighboring Iraq's Kurdish-controlled north, Egemen Bagis, an adviser to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, said today.

"Our allies and neighbors should capture terrorists and hand them over,'' Bagis said in a telephone interview from Lisbon, where he was attending a European Union summit. "We want the U.S. to treat the PKK as they treat al-Qaeda.''

Turkey's parliament yesterday authorized the use of military force against the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, a step that the U.S. fears may further damage Iraq's security and disrupt oil shipments from the region.

Mostly Muslim Turkey, which has the second-largest army in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, says U.S.-led forces in Iraq are failing to control about 3,500 PKK militants sheltering in the relatively calm north.

Turkey says American forces are obliged to eradicate the threat posed by the PKK because the U.S. designates the group a terrorist organization. The PKK's two-decade war with Turkey has cost almost 40,000 lives. The PKK demands autonomy for Turkey's 12 million Kurds.

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I think what Bob is trying to say is that under Saddam Hussein, the Turks would never dare invade Iraqi territory, and that by toppling the regime (and failing - thus far - to put a stable government in place), the US has effectively encouraged the Turks to consider the military option.

Why the eliptical approach Bob ? Why not just SAY it ? :)

Iraq = Worst foreign policy blunder in American history.

Oh come on. Worse than Veitnam ? Keep some perspective, please.

Should have thought of what?

I had no control of how the Ottomon Empire was divided, nor did I have control over the signing of the Treaty of Lausanne, rejecting an independent Kurdistan. Nor did I have control over the military conflicts between the Kurds, Turks, Persian and Arabs over the past 100 years, including conflicts up to the moment of the US invasion (yes, the Turks did enter Iraqi Kurdistan during Saddam Hussien's reign).

Stop wriggling Bruce and admit your responsibility like a man. Whillst we're on the topic, you did a VERY poor job in Rwanda, Bosnia, Somalia, and Veitnam. Also, the weather today was not very good. Plus, my ginger beer has gone a bit flat. Get your act together man !

Meow Purr. :rofl:

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I think what Bob is trying to say is that under Saddam Hussein, the Turks would never dare invade Iraqi territory, and that by toppling the regime (and failing - thus far - to put a stable government in place), the US has effectively encouraged the Turks to consider the military option.

Why the eliptical approach Bob ? Why not just SAY it ? :)

Meow Purr. :rofl:

Because he knows it is not true. They made incursions before in pursuit of Kurds hiding in Iraq. Besides, during Saddam Hussien's reign, Turkey could have invaded Northern Iraq and Saddam could not have done much about it.

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You still never answered the question o wise Bruce. What should we do?

any ideas ships-cat?

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bobs hatred for bush has blinded him....what does bush have to do with a turkish incursion...thats the last thing he wants....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_aggression

Waging a war of aggression is a crime under customary international law and refers to any war not out of self-defense or sanctioned by Article 51 of the UN Charter.

The International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, which followed World War II, called the waging of aggressive war "essentially an evil thing...to initiate a war of aggression...is not only an international crime; it is the supreme international crime differing only from other war crimes in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole."[1]

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Well, I guess that breaks down into two sub-questions:

SHOULD we do anything ?

CAN we do anything ?

The Turks will argue (ARE arguing) that they are merely going after a paramilitary terrorist group, and that they are responding to an existing chrisis, not unilaterly declaring war. I believe the UN has already declared the PKK to be a terrorist organisation ?

In practice, what can we do ? Putting diplomatic pressure on Ankara doesn't seem to have yielded much so far.

What would YOU suggest Bob ?

Meow Purr.

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Well, I guess that breaks down into two sub-questions:

SHOULD we do anything ?

CAN we do anything ?

The Turks will argue (ARE arguing) that they are merely going after a paramilitary terrorist group, and that they are responding to an existing chrisis, not unilaterly declaring war. I believe the UN has already declared the PKK to be a terrorist organisation ?

In practice, what can we do ? Putting diplomatic pressure on Ankara doesn't seem to have yielded much so far.

What would YOU suggest Bob ?

Meow Purr.

Well, there is probably not much we can do. Aside from International pressure. Which, being that Bush has isolated us and turned the International community against us, I doubt it will happen.

Its a fine mess alright.

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seems to me that the Kurds happen to be living in and around the spots where Turkey would like to build some ew dams , this has been an issue for many years , so Turkey was " comming in " regardless of what happened betwen USA and Iraq

BBc News

National geographic news

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Well, there is probably not much we can do. Aside from International pressure. Which, being that Bush has isolated us and turned the International community against us, I doubt it will happen.

Its a fine mess alright.

Well, there's nothing to stop the US raising this in the Security Council and seeing how they react. It would be an intersting bellweather of international opinion on the issue. If the SC members decline to take any action, then the US can - rightly - hold up it's hands and say "we tried to help - but the international will was against us... what can we do ? "

Meow Purr.

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I think that the UN should issue a resolution calling for the disarmanent of the Kurds, the respecting of international boundaries by Turkey and maybe stick a couple of hundred blue-helmets from Fiji along the border, that should fix everything

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I think that the UN should issue a resolution calling for the disarmanent of the Kurds, the respecting of international boundaries by Turkey and maybe stick a couple of hundred blue-helmets from Fiji along the border, that should fix everything

Hmmm... as long as we can be confident that the Kurds won't simply start attacking the UN troops ?

Meow Purr.

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Well, there's nothing to stop the US raising this in the Security Council and seeing how they react. It would be an intersting bellweather of international opinion on the issue. If the SC members decline to take any action, then the US can - rightly - hold up it's hands and say "we tried to help - but the international will was against us... what can we do ? "

Meow Purr.

Guess they won't put that to the UN, 'cause maybe the fact comes out that they wanted the PKK to stir some mayhem in Iran... but, as I supposed, they rather went after their favorite enemy: Turkey.

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