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U.N. challenges U.S. on illegal air strikes


Bob26003

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U.N. challenges U.S. on illegal air strikes in Iraq

By Nicolas J. S. Davies

Online Journal Contributing Writer

Oct 23, 2007, 00:37

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Just as U.S. air operations over Iraq have reached their highest level since the destruction of Fallujah in November 2004, with as many as 70 close air support missions flown on many days since October 1, a new Human Rights Report published by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Iraq has challenged the United States to stop killing civilians in illegal air strikes.

The Human Rights Report for the second quarter of 2007 was long overdue, and was finally published on October 11. The report explains that it was modified following discussions with U.S. and Iraqi occupation authorities, and this appears to account for the long delay in its publication.

The report makes it clear that U.S. air strikes in densely populated civilian areas are violations of international human rights law. A footnote to the section on "MNF military operations and the killing of civilians" explains, "Customary international humanitarian law demands that, as much as possible, military objectives must not be located within areas densely populated by civilians. The presence of individual combatants among a great number of civilians does not alter the civilian character of an area."

UNAMI demands "that all credible allegations of unlawful killings by MNF (Multi National Force) forces be thoroughly, promptly and impartially investigated, and appropriate action taken against military personnel found to have used excessive or indiscriminate force" and adds that, "The initiation of investigation into such incidents, as well as their findings, should be made public."

The UNAMI report provides the following details of 88 Iraqi civilians killed by air strikes, 15 civilians killed "in the context of raid and search operations" by U.S. ground forces and several incidents of torture and extra-judicial execution by members of Iraqi auxiliary forces under overall U.S. command. UNAMI investigated these incidents because a relative, a journalist or a local official brought each one to its attention. Without doubt, the U.S. Department of Defense is aware of many more killings of civilians by air strikes and ground operations, hence UNAMI's urgent demand for full public disclosure and investigation of all such killings.

March 11 - Nine civilians in 5 villages near Ba'quba killed by U.S. air strikes.

March 13 & 14 - Twelve Palestinians detained by the Interior Ministry at al-Baladiyat and tortured with electric shocks to sensitive parts of the body, forcing metal sticks down the throat, and rape and other sexual assault with metal objects.

March 15 - Two civilians killed in Dulu'iya by a U.S. air strike.

March 29 - A 14-year-old boy and three other family members killed in Mosul by a U.S. raid on the home of Zeyour Mohamed Khalil.

March 30 - Sixteen civilians killed in Sadr City by U.S. air strikes.

April 2 - Six civilians killed in U.S. raids on the homes of Bashar Mahfoudh and Walid al-Ahmadi near Mosul.

April 3 - Twenty-seven civilians killed in Khaldiya, near Ramadi, by U.S. air strikes.

April 12 - Three civilians killed in southern Haditha in a house raid by U.S. forces.

April 26 - U.S. air strikes kill four civilians in Sadr City and four more in Taji.

April 29 - Al-Kesra, Baghdad, five men found dead after being detained by Iraqi Army in al-Sifina.

April 30 - Three civilians killed by an air strike in Basra.

May 3 - Hay al-Amel, Baghdad, 16 people detained and killed by Interior Ministry Public Order Forces.

May 4th - Al-Dubbat, Baghdad, 14 civilians arrested and then shot dead by Iraqi security forces.

May 5 - Seven civilians killed by a U.S. air strike east of Baghdad.

May 5 - Hay al-Rissala, Baghdad, men guarding a mosque detained and executed by Iraqi security forces.

May 6 - One civilian killed by a U.S. air strike in Sadr City.

May 8 - Seven children killed by a U.S. helicopter attack on an elementary school in Diyala province.

May 26 - Eight civilians in Basra killed by air strikes.

May 29 - Four prisoners executed by the Kurdistan Regional Government after testifying to the death under torture of Fahmi Ismail Abu Bakr in 2005.

June 6 - Yassin Farhan and his son Sarmad killed by U.S. troops in a house raid in Baghdad.

April-June - Seventy-three percent of KRG detainees interviewed by UNAMI reported being victims of torture.

The recent increase in U.S. air operations in Iraq has brought a spate of reports of more such incidents. On the day the UNAMI report was released, six women, nine children and 19 men were killed in air strikes near Lake Tharthar, north of Baghdad. The Centcom press office immediately declared that the 19 men were "terrorists" but similar claims regarding previous air strikes have been contradicted by local residents and officials, and they beg the question as to how you know that 19 men were "terrorists" after you've blown them off the face of the earth. An air strike on September 25 in Mussayyib, 30 miles south of Baghdad, killed five women and four children; and one on September 28 on the al-Saha district of Baghdad killed seven men, two women and four children. Once again, I must stress that these incidents just happen to have been reported and that they are probably only the tip of the iceberg of civilians being killed by U.S. air strikes.

Iraqi Health Ministry reports in September 2004 and January 2005 attributed 72 percent and 62 percent respectively of civilian deaths in Iraq to "coalition" forces, not "insurgents", and attributed the high numbers killed by U.S. forces specifically to air strikes. The first of two epidemiological studies on mortality in Iraq published in the Lancet medical journal supported these findings, while the second did not attempt to break down deaths by who was responsible. The Health Ministry retracted its January 2005 figures after the BBC reported them, and has stopped attributing any proportion of Iraqi deaths to occupation forces. It is important to understand that, while "precision" weapons are more accurate today than in the past, about 15-25 percent still miss their targets by at least 40 feet, so the impression conveyed by the Centcom press office and CNN that they can be used to safely and surgically "zap" one house in an urban area is an artful blend of propaganda and science fiction.

Previous reports by Iraqi and international human rights monitors have also found that 60-80 percent of prisoners held by Iraqi forces recruited, trained and directed by the U.S. command in Iraq have been tortured, and UNAMI has documented cases in which people have been sentenced to death and executed based on confessions apparently obtained by torture. The current report also protests the indefinite detention of Iraqis without charge by U.S. forces, and states "persons who are deprived of their liberty are entitled to be informed of the reasons for their arrest; to be brought promptly before a judge if held on a criminal charge, and to challenge the lawfulness of their detention."

The UNAMI report does not directly address torture by U.S. forces, but the International Committee of the Red Cross and other human rights groups have documented extensive and systematic violations of international humanitarian law in the treatment of prisoners by U.S. forces in Iraq. The U.S. government has tortured and abused prisoners throughout its network of prisons in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Cuba, as well as in CIA-run prisons in Romania, Mauretania, Diego Garcia, and elsewhere. Human rights groups have amassed incontrovertible evidence of systematic torture, authorized at the highest levels, throughout this gulag, including death threats, mock executions, near-drowning, excruciating stress positions, hypothermia, sleep deprivation, electric shocks, various forms of sodomy, and endless beatings, to say nothing of more psychological forms of torture such as sexual humiliation and torture of family members.

In February 2006, Human Rights First issued “Command’s Respon

Article Continues.......... http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_2560.shtml

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The UN might actually be the very last body in all the world qualified to speak on "human rights" or judge America.

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The UN might actually be the very last body in all the world qualified to speak on "human rights" or judge America.

Then who is ?? The U.S. ? America is a continent and i sure will go with what the U.N. recomends over you and the U.S.

Had to add the U.N. is made up of members from around the globe, but yet the U.S. speakes for them all by there actions and disregard for the U.N. Sounds like you have a bit of ego due to the size of your gun, but not the size of your brain. Hmmm typical "Amaerican" not America attitude. So you think world law sucks and George Bush should be the deciding factor hmmm, what to make of that.

Edited by The Silver Thong
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A number of concrete obligations can be derived from this general

principle of distinction, such as the prohibition of direct attacks against civilian

persons and objects1 and the prohibition of acts or threats of violence the primary

purpose of which is to spread terror among the civilian population.2 Similarly,

indiscriminate attacks are also prohibited. These are attacks that are not or cannot

be directed at a specific military objective, as well as those whose intended effects

cannot be limited as required by IHL.3

However, it remains legally accepted that, in the harsh reality of war,

civilian persons and objects may be incidentally affected by an attack directed at a

legitimate military objective. Euphemistically referred to as ‘‘collateral casualties’’

or ‘‘collateral damage’’,4 civilians may be victims of mistaken target identification

or of unintended but inevitable side effects of an attack on a legitimate target in

their vicinity. According to the principle of proportionality, these

collateral casualties and damages are lawful under treaty and customary law only

if they are not excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage

anticipated.5

In addition, even when a lawful attack is launched, precautionary

measures are required of both the attacking party and the party being attacked, in

order to avoid (or at least to minimize) the collateral effects of hostilities on

civilian persons, the civilian population and civilian objects. The present

contribution will focus on the substance of the precautionary obligations required

of all belligerents – both in attack and against the effects of attack – as codified

in Additional Protocol I.6 This article will seek to demonstrate that these rules

are not simply hortatory norms encouraging good practice. They constitute

obligatory standards of conduct whose violation would entail international

responsibility.

-----

Source (.pdf file)

The US airstrikes weren't indiscriminate and they were based on targets.

Edited by __Kratos__
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A number of concrete obligations can be derived from this general

principle of distinction, such as the prohibition of direct attacks against civilian

persons and objects1 and the prohibition of acts or threats of violence the primary

purpose of which is to spread terror among the civilian population.2 Similarly,

indiscriminate attacks are also prohibited. These are attacks that are not or cannot

be directed at a specific military objective, as well as those whose intended effects

cannot be limited as required by IHL.3

However, it remains legally accepted that, in the harsh reality of war,

civilian persons and objects may be incidentally affected by an attack directed at a

legitimate military objective. Euphemistically referred to as ‘‘collateral casualties’’

or ‘‘collateral damage’’,4 civilians may be victims of mistaken target identification

or of unintended but inevitable side effects of an attack on a legitimate target in

their vicinity. According to the principle of proportionality, these

collateral casualties and damages are lawful under treaty and customary law only

if they are not excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage

anticipated.5

In addition, even when a lawful attack is launched, precautionary

measures are required of both the attacking party and the party being attacked, in

order to avoid (or at least to minimize) the collateral effects of hostilities on

civilian persons, the civilian population and civilian objects. The present

contribution will focus on the substance of the precautionary obligations required

of all belligerents – both in attack and against the effects of attack – as codified

in Additional Protocol I.6 This article will seek to demonstrate that these rules

are not simply hortatory norms encouraging good practice. They constitute

obligatory standards of conduct whose violation would entail international

responsibility.

-----

Source (.pdf file)

The US airstrikes weren't indiscriminate and they were based on targets.

As we have seen in Wako Texas for example. Mind you not an air attack.

Edited by The Silver Thong
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U.N. challenges U.S. on illegal air strikes in Iraq

By Nicolas J. S. Davies

Online Journal Contributing Writer

Do you have the official UN warning source?

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If the UN had done its job years ago, and not let Saddam Hussein, The Taliban and Al quaeda commit wholesale slaughter of innocents for years and years, we wouldn't have this mess.

But the UN is a paper tiger. Send a letter of warning. Send another letter of warning. Send an even stronger letter of warning. Pass a resolution decrying the act, and send that resolution.

The UN is a joke. It has no teeth.

The show of force is better than the use of force, but the UN has no force to show.

If the UN had any teeth, it could do wonders. As it is, it's just a collection of political bigots.

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U.N. challenges U.S. on illegal air strikes in Iraq

By Nicolas J. S. Davies

Online Journal Contributing Writer

One thing missing on this illegal airstike, and that is the Iraqis complaining about it themsleves.

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One thing missing on this illegal airstike, and that is the Iraqis complaining about it themsleves.

It was the third claim of civilian casualties from U.S. airstrikes in as many days, raids that have prompted complaints from both sides of the sectarian divide that too many Iraqis are losing their lives, particularly as the Americans increasingly rely on air power to attack militants.

Source

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Nice job Kratos. :tu:

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Nice job Kratos. :tu:

Do you have the official UN source challenging the U.S. on illegal air strikes for the second time?

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Havent found it yet Caesar.

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Havent found it yet Caesar.

Didn't you even check out the U.N. site to see if its even true?

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FOUND IT

<a href="http://www.uniraq.org/docsmaps/undocuments...ame=undocuments" target="_blank">http://www.uniraq.org/docsmaps/undocuments...ame=undocuments</a>

MNF military operations and the killing of civilians

19. At the end of April, the MNF presence in Iraq increased as further deployments of

US troops brought the total number to some 146,000. Most of these additional troops were

deployed in support of the Baghdad Security Plan.

20. UNAMI recorded a number of incidents in which 88 civilians were reportedly

killed during air strikes conducted by MNF forces.12 They included the following: nine

civilians killed in five villages in the al-Anbakiya area near Ba’quba on 11 March; two

civilians killed in Dulu’iya in Salahuddin Governorate on 15 March; 16 civilians killed in

Sadr City in Baghdad on 30 March; 27 civilians killed in Khaldiya, Ramadi, on 3 April;

four civilians killed in Sadr City and four others west of Taji on 26 April; three civilians

killed in Basra on 30 April; seven civilians killed east of Baghdad on 5 May; one civilian

killed in Sadr City on 6 May; and eight civilians killed in Basra on 26 May. On 8 May,

seven children were reportedly killed when helicopters attacked an elementary school in a

village in Diyala Governorate near the Iranian border. Following this incident, a

spokesperson for US forces in Iraq, Lieutenant-Colonel Christopher Garver, announced

that the MNF authorities were conducting an investigation into the circumstances

surrounding the death of the children. However, the findings of such investigations are not

systematically publicized. On 28 June, UNAMI wrote to the MNF Chief of Staff, seeking

further information on all these recorded incidents in which civilians were said to have

been killed during air strikes.

21. Other incidents involving the alleged killing of civilians in the context of raid and

search operations carried out by MNF ground forces were also recorded. Among them were

the following: on 29 March, MNF soldiers raided the house of Zeyour Mohamed Khalil in

Mosul, allegedly shooting four persons including a 14-year-old boy; on 2 April, six

civilians were allegedly killed when MNF troops raided the homes of Bashar Mahfoudh

12 Some of the most fundamental rules of customary international humanitarian law oblige combatants to take

precautionary measures to spare the civilian population and civilian objects, and in particular to ensure that

attacks would not be excessive in relation to the concrete military advantage expected – the principle of

proportionality. Customary international humanitarian law demands that, as much as possible, military

objectives must not be located within areas densely populated by civilians. The presence of individual

combatants among a great number of civilians does not alter the civilian character of an area.

10

and Walid al-Ahmadi in two areas outside Mosul, Hay al-Bakr and Hay al-Salam; on 12

April, a further three civilians were allegedly killed in al-Bojyat village in southern Haditha

in a raid and search operation carried out by MNF soldiers; and on 6 June, MNF forces in

Baghdad allegedly shot dead two Iraqi civilians, Sarmad Yassin Farhan and his father

Yassin Farhan, in their home as the father tried to prevent the soldiers from apprehending

his son. In a letter dated 11 May to the then MNF Chief of Staff, UNAMI requested

information on the incidents of 29 March and 2 April. In the same letter, UNAMI also

reiterated its call for an investigation into an MNF air strike on al-Eshaqi sub-district in

Salahuddin Governorate on 8 December 2006, in which 37 civilians were reportedly

killed.13 No response had been received from the MNF by the end of June.

22. During the reporting period, several reports emerged of killings carried out by

privately hired contractors with security-related functions in support of US government

authorities. According to the Washington Post, for example, employees of Blackwater, a

private security firm operating in Iraq under contract to the US State Department, shot an

Iraqi whose vehicle had allegedly moved too close to their convoy in the vicinity of the

Ministry of Interior in Baghdad on 24 May. In another incident, The Independent

newspaper reported on 10 June that 19-year-old Yas Ali Mohammed Yassiri was shot dead

in a taxi in the al-Masbah neighborhood in Baghdad’s al-Karrada district by bodyguards of

the US embassy spokesperson. The legal status of thousands of private contractors working

in Iraq remains unclear. While not officially considered employees of the US government,

Coalition Provisional Authority Order Number 17 of 2004 nevertheless grants them

immunity from prosecution within the Iraqi judicial system “with respect to acts performed

by them pursuant to the terms and conditions of a Contract or any sub-contract thereto”.14

While CPA Order 17 also enables the US Government to waive a contractor’s immunity,15

to UNAMI’s knowledge it has not done so to date. Certain categories of contractor

employees are subject to US military law under the Uniform Code of Military Justice

(UCMJ), amended in January 2007 to broaden its scope to allow military jurisdiction over

persons “serving with or accompanying an armed force in the field” during a “time of

declared war or a contingency operation”. Contractors who commit offences over which

the US Government has extraterritorial jurisdiction can also be prosecuted in the US court

system.16 UNAMI shares ICRC’s view that private military firms must respect international

humanitarian law and that the increasing recourse to their services “risks eroding the

fundamental distinction between civilians and combatants because these people may not

appear clearly as quite one or the other”.17

13 UNAMI Human Rights Report, November-December 2006, para. 120.

14 CPA/ORD/27 June 2004/17 (Revised), Status of the Coalition Provisional Authority, MNF-Iraq, Certain

Missions and Personnel in Iraq, Section 4(3). The Order also states: “Contractors shall not be subject to Iraqi

laws or regulations in matters relating to the terms and conditions of their Contracts […]” (Section 4(2)). CPA

Order 17 was initially promulgated in June 2003 (Status of the Coalition, Foreign Liaison Missions, Their

Personnel and Contractors), and revised on the eve of the dissolution of the CPA in June 2004. Contractors

employed in Iraq by Coalition Sending States other than the US are also governed by CPA Order 17 with

respect to their contractual relationships.

15 Ibid., Section 5(1).

16 US legislation under which such prosecution can be brought includes the 1996 War Crimes Act, the 1994

federal anti-torture statute and the 2000 Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act (MEJA). In this context,

there have been no prosecutions to date under the War Crimes Act and one successful prosecution under

MEJA. US Department of Defense contractors are covered under MEJA, but it is unclear whether contractors

unconnected to Department of Defense operations abroad are also covered.

17 http://www.icrc.org/web/eng/siteeng0.nsf/h...nterview-271106 (last visited

on 16 August 2007).

11

23. UNAMI urges that all credible allegations of unlawful killings by MNF forces be

thoroughly, promptly and impartially investigated, and appropriate action taken against

military personnel found to have used excessive or indiscriminate force. The initiation of

investigations into such incidents, as well as their findings, should be made public. UNAMI

also urges the US authorities to investigate reports of deaths caused by privately hired

contractors, and establish effective mechanisms for holding them accountable for where

the circumstances surrounding the killings show no justifiable cause. The US Government

should take steps to ensure that offenses committed in Iraq by all categories of US

contractor employees are subject to prosecution under the law.

Edited by Bob26003
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I'm not saying they didn't say that. I just cant find the U.N. saying anything about it. only onlinejournal.com and unobserver.com but nothing on any major news or U.N. site.

http://onlinejournal.com/artman/publish/article_2560.shtml

http://www.unobserver.com/layout5.php?id=3987&blz=1

Please Refer to http://www.uniraq.org/docsmaps/undocuments...ame=undocuments

Human Rights Report 1 July – 31 August 2005

Section: MNF military operation and the killing of civilians

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Nice job Kratos. :tu:

On killing your article's misleading claims with my first post here? Why, thank you. :)

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FOUND IT

<a href="http://www.uniraq.org/docsmaps/undocuments...ame=undocuments" target="_blank">http://www.uniraq.org/docsmaps/undocuments...ame=undocuments</a>

MNF military operations and the killing of civilians

19. At the end of April, the MNF presence in Iraq increased as further deployments of

US troops brought the total number to some 146,000. Most of these additional troops were

deployed in support of the Baghdad Security Plan.

20. UNAMI recorded a number of incidents in which 88 civilians were reportedly

killed during air strikes conducted by MNF forces.12 They included the following: nine

civilians killed in five villages in the al-Anbakiya area near Ba’quba on 11 March; two

civilians killed in Dulu’iya in Salahuddin Governorate on 15 March; 16 civilians killed in

Sadr City in Baghdad on 30 March; 27 civilians killed in Khaldiya, Ramadi, on 3 April;

four civilians killed in Sadr City and four others west of Taji on 26 April; three civilians

killed in Basra on 30 April; seven civilians killed east of Baghdad on 5 May; one civilian

killed in Sadr City on 6 May; and eight civilians killed in Basra on 26 May. On 8 May,

seven children were reportedly killed when helicopters attacked an elementary school in a

village in Diyala Governorate near the Iranian border. Following this incident, a

spokesperson for US forces in Iraq, Lieutenant-Colonel Christopher Garver, announced

that the MNF authorities were conducting an investigation into the circumstances

surrounding the death of the children. However, the findings of such investigations are not

systematically publicized. On 28 June, UNAMI wrote to the MNF Chief of Staff, seeking

further information on all these recorded incidents in which civilians were said to have

been killed during air strikes.

21. Other incidents involving the alleged killing of civilians in the context of raid and

search operations carried out by MNF ground forces were also recorded. Among them were

the following: on 29 March, MNF soldiers raided the house of Zeyour Mohamed Khalil in

Mosul, allegedly shooting four persons including a 14-year-old boy; on 2 April, six

civilians were allegedly killed when MNF troops raided the homes of Bashar Mahfoudh

12 Some of the most fundamental rules of customary international humanitarian law oblige combatants to take

precautionary measures to spare the civilian population and civilian objects, and in particular to ensure that

attacks would not be excessive in relation to the concrete military advantage expected – the principle of

proportionality. Customary international humanitarian law demands that, as much as possible, military

objectives must not be located within areas densely populated by civilians. The presence of individual

combatants among a great number of civilians does not alter the civilian character of an area.

10

and Walid al-Ahmadi in two areas outside Mosul, Hay al-Bakr and Hay al-Salam; on 12

April, a further three civilians were allegedly killed in al-Bojyat village in southern Haditha

in a raid and search operation carried out by MNF soldiers; and on 6 June, MNF forces in

Baghdad allegedly shot dead two Iraqi civilians, Sarmad Yassin Farhan and his father

Yassin Farhan, in their home as the father tried to prevent the soldiers from apprehending

his son. In a letter dated 11 May to the then MNF Chief of Staff, UNAMI requested

information on the incidents of 29 March and 2 April. In the same letter, UNAMI also

reiterated its call for an investigation into an MNF air strike on al-Eshaqi sub-district in

Salahuddin Governorate on 8 December 2006, in which 37 civilians were reportedly

killed.13 No response had been received from the MNF by the end of June.

22. During the reporting period, several reports emerged of killings carried out by

privately hired contractors with security-related functions in support of US government

authorities. According to the Washington Post, for example, employees of Blackwater, a

private security firm operating in Iraq under contract to the US State Department, shot an

Iraqi whose vehicle had allegedly moved too close to their convoy in the vicinity of the

Ministry of Interior in Baghdad on 24 May. In another incident, The Independent

newspaper reported on 10 June that 19-year-old Yas Ali Mohammed Yassiri was shot dead

in a taxi in the al-Masbah neighborhood in Baghdad’s al-Karrada district by bodyguards of

the US embassy spokesperson. The legal status of thousands of private contractors working

in Iraq remains unclear. While not officially considered employees of the US government,

Coalition Provisional Authority Order Number 17 of 2004 nevertheless grants them

immunity from prosecution within the Iraqi judicial system “with respect to acts performed

by them pursuant to the terms and conditions of a Contract or any sub-contract thereto”.14

While CPA Order 17 also enables the US Government to waive a contractor’s immunity,15

to UNAMI’s knowledge it has not done so to date. Certain categories of contractor

employees are subject to US military law under the Uniform Code of Military Justice

(UCMJ), amended in January 2007 to broaden its scope to allow military jurisdiction over

persons “serving with or accompanying an armed force in the field” during a “time of

declared war or a contingency operation”. Contractors who commit offences over which

the US Government has extraterritorial jurisdiction can also be prosecuted in the US court

system.16 UNAMI shares ICRC’s view that private military firms must respect international

humanitarian law and that the increasing recourse to their services “risks eroding the

fundamental distinction between civilians and combatants because these people may not

appear clearly as quite one or the other”.17

13 UNAMI Human Rights Report, November-December 2006, para. 120.

14 CPA/ORD/27 June 2004/17 (Revised), Status of the Coalition Provisional Authority, MNF-Iraq, Certain

Missions and Personnel in Iraq, Section 4(3). The Order also states: “Contractors shall not be subject to Iraqi

laws or regulations in matters relating to the terms and conditions of their Contracts […]” (Section 4(2)). CPA

Order 17 was initially promulgated in June 2003 (Status of the Coalition, Foreign Liaison Missions, Their

Personnel and Contractors), and revised on the eve of the dissolution of the CPA in June 2004. Contractors

employed in Iraq by Coalition Sending States other than the US are also governed by CPA Order 17 with

respect to their contractual relationships.

15 Ibid., Section 5(1).

16 US legislation under which such prosecution can be brought includes the 1996 War Crimes Act, the 1994

federal anti-torture statute and the 2000 Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act (MEJA). In this context,

there have been no prosecutions to date under the War Crimes Act and one successful prosecution under

MEJA. US Department of Defense contractors are covered under MEJA, but it is unclear whether contractors

unconnected to Department of Defense operations abroad are also covered.

17 <a href="http://www.icrc.org/web/eng/siteeng0.nsf/h...nterview-271106" target="_blank">http://www.icrc.org/web/eng/siteeng0.nsf/h...nterview-271106</a> (last visited

on 16 August 2007).

11

23. UNAMI urges that all credible allegations of unlawful killings by MNF forces be

thoroughly, promptly and impartially investigated, and appropriate action taken against

military personnel found to have used excessive or indiscriminate force. The initiation of

investigations into such incidents, as well as their findings, should be made public. UNAMI

also urges the US authorities to investigate reports of deaths caused by privately hired

contractors, and establish effective mechanisms for holding them accountable for where

the circumstances surrounding the killings show no justifiable cause. The US Government

should take steps to ensure that offenses committed in Iraq by all categories of US

contractor employees are subject to prosecution under the law.

Does this report even look close as to what was first posted?

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On killing your article's misleading claims with my first post here? Why, thank you. :)

Yeah, looks nice on paper doesn't it.

But thats about it. :hmm:

The simple truth is that we have been killing a bunch of civilians........ Hell, they even suppress info about how many civilians are killed.

===========

Lawsuit demands US reveal civilian deaths in Iraq, Afghanistan

http://rawstory.com/news/afp/Lawsuit_deman...__09042007.html

===========

Iraqi civilian deaths rise

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSN3127691220070901

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Yeah, looks nice on paper doesn't it.

But thats about it. :hmm:

The simple truth is that we have been killing a bunch of civilians........ Hell, they even suppress info about how many civilians are killed.

No one said otherwise.

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It was the third claim of civilian casualties from U.S. airstrikes in as many days, raids that have prompted complaints from both sides of the sectarian divide that too many Iraqis are losing their lives, particularly as the Americans increasingly rely on air power to attack militants.

Source

I'm am talking about complain by the Iraqis, not a few Iraqis. You know where the governement of Iraq would take action to put a stop to it?

And as always, the insurgents use civilians for cover so Bob26003 can post it all over the UM. :)

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