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Ancient kangaroo didn't hop

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user posted image rA 25-million-year-old fossil has revealed that a predecessor of Australia's iconic hopping kangaroo once galloped on all fours, had dog-like fangs and possibly climbed trees, scientists have reported. "This is really the great, great, great, great grandfather of modern kangaroos," a member of the Australian team that analysed the bones, La Trobe University paleontologist Ben Kear, told The Age newspaper.

news icon View: Full Article | Source: Yahoo! News

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The Original Chupa King

I was reading about an Aboriginal myth that the kangaroo originally walked on all fours, but copied a dance from the Aboriginals in which they hopped around, so this might not be amazing information if Aboriginals knew it before we did.

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Purplos

Aren't there tree kangaroos that sort of creep around in the branches? Yup. Just looked them up.

I guess the ancient ones were more like those.

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Blueguardian

ancient kangaroo a chupacabra?

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SilverCougar
ancient kangaroo a chupacabra?

Ah.. that's a big ol' negatory there...

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:PsYKoTiC:BeHAvIoR:
ancient kangaroo a chupacabra?

That's a huge leap. No puns intended. Heh. What I'm curious though is what made the kangaroo evolve so it now hops. I can only speculate, from what I read was as the climate changed, the ecosystem went from tropical to desert-like conditions, which exposed them to predators. I know a kangaroo are fast on land once they hop to it and can outrun most of their enemies. Again no puns intended.

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She-ra
I was reading about an Aboriginal myth that the kangaroo originally walked on all fours, but copied a dance from the Aboriginals in which they hopped around, so this might not be amazing information if Aboriginals knew it before we did.

Yes. Absolutely cool news and proof to that myth now! :)

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Raptor
I was reading about an Aboriginal myth that the kangaroo originally walked on all fours, but copied a dance from the Aboriginals in which they hopped around, so this might not be amazing information if Aboriginals knew it before we did.

Of course they didn't. We're talking about an event that happened at least 10,000,000 years ago, anatomically modern humans only appeared 200,000 years ago.

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passionate
Yes. Absolutely cool news and proof to that myth now! :)

it makes me wonder if the other myths and legends could be true! ;)

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The Original Chupa King
Of course they didn't. We're talking about an event that happened at least 10,000,000 years ago, anatomically modern humans only appeared 200,000 years ago.

Yet, they would have been the first human culture to possibly know of this "ancient kangaroo"'s existance thru former cultures. I mean, the Aboriginals didn't just pop out of ground, they must of had a previous existing culture before they started making the myths and such, before they were called modern man. Cavemen (extremely unscientific) drew art in caves in France, depicting everyday life. The Aboriginal's ancestors probably did the same, resulting in the possible knowledge of a hopless kangaroo

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