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UK has left behind murder and chaos


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UK has left behind murder and chaos, says Basra police chief

Blunt assessment delivered as British hand over security to Iraqis

(Warning: The film below contains graphic images which some viewers may find distressing)

Mona Mahmoud, Maggie O'Kane and Ian Black

Monday December 17, 2007

The Guardian

The full scale of the chaos left behind by British forces in Basra was revealed yesterday as the city's police chief described a province in the grip of well-armed militias strong enough to overpower security forces and brutal enough to behead women considered not sufficiently Islamic.

As British forces finally handed over security in Basra province, marking the end of 4½ years of control in southern Iraq, Major General Jalil Khalaf, the new police commander, said the occupation had left him with a situation close to mayhem. "They left me militia, they left me gangsters, and they left me all the troubles in the world," he said in an interview for Guardian Films and ITV.

Khalaf painted a very different picture from that of British officials who, while acknowledging problems in southern Iraq, said yesterday's handover at Basra airbase was timely and appropriate.

Major General Graham Binns, who led British troops into the city in 2003, said the province had "begun to regain its strength". He added: "I came to rid Basra of its enemies and I now formally hand Basra back to its friends."

But in the film, to be broadcast on the Guardian Unlimited website and ITV News, Khalaf lists a catalogue of failings, saying:

· Basra has become so lawless that in the last three months 45 women have been killed for being "immoral" because they were not fully covered or because they may have given birth outside wedlock;

· The British unintentionally rearmed Shia militias by failing to recognise that Iraqi troops were loyal to more than one authority;

· Shia militia are better armed than his men and control Iraq's main port.

In the interview he said the main problem the Iraqi security forces now faced was the struggle to wrest control back from the militia. He appealed for the British to help him do that: "We need the British to help us to watch our borders - both sea and land and we need their intelligence and air support and to keep training the Iraqi police."

David Miliband, the foreign secretary, who attended the handover ceremony, acknowledged that the territory was not "a land of milk and honey" and promised Britain would remain a "committed friend" of Iraq.

But he insisted it was the right time to hand back control. "The key conditions for the transfer of security responsibility to the Iraqi security forces are whether they are up to it: do they have the numbers? Do they have the leadership and training to provide leadership for this province? And the answer to those three questions is yes," he said.

After the handover Des Browne, the defence secretary, praised British forces - 174 of whom have died since the start of the war in March 2003. "Their contribution has been outstanding and their courage inspiring," he said. A scaled-down UK force will remain in a single base at Basra airport, with a small training mission and a rapid reaction team on "overwatch".

Full story, Source: The Guardian

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This is worrying, but people need to bear in mind if this sort of violence continues and the Iraqis fail to stop it, it is not the failure of the British Army, but the Shower of sh** AKA, the Liebour government, plain and simple, politicians playing politics and trying to win brownie points by bowing to public opinion and this is the result, reducing the number of troops has left us unable to go back in, and can you see Brown sending more troops back, i cant, i just hope for the Iraqi people that their security forces can stop the violence,.......... If not then brown will have to grow a set of balls and make a tough decision

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UK has left behind murder and chaos, says Basra police chief

Major General Jalil Khalaf, the new police commander, said the occupation had left him with a situation close to mayhem. "They left me militia, they left me gangsters, and they left me all the troubles in the world," he said in an interview for Guardian Films and ITV.

Typical of the Guardian.

The Militia's, Gangsters, and troubles are IRAQI troubles. If Maj-Gen Jalil can't cope, then he needs to get resources from the Iraqi government. The British Armed Services have been there for over 4 years. We did not CREATE this society. The Iraqi government whould back him, or replace hime with someone who can deal with the situation.

Meow Purr.

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Oh, in Iraq. I was about to say, I don't think we've left behind murder and chaos here, sadly it still seems to be all around. :-/

We did not CREATE this society.

well, we did, kind of, after the First World War, or at any rate we assembled Iraq out of various independent states, and they've been pretty much at each other's throats ever since.

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