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france protects itself from the dreaded


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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/arti...in_page_id=1811

France protects itself from the dreaded English language by banning 'email' and 'podcasting'

France has launched a new drive to stop a glut of English words from invading the native tongue.

Terms including "email", "blog" and "fast-food" should all be banished from the language, according to French culture ministry chiefs.

Others words threatening to steam-roller French vocabulary out of existence are "supermodel", "take-away" food and "low-cost airline".

Even such obscure terms as "shadow-boxing" and "detachable motor caravan" - which have apparently slipped into French usage - are included in the 65 pages of banned words on the ministry's new website, which was launched this week.

French linguists at the Academie Francaise - the body that monitors and protects the their language - have come up with Gallic equivalents to more than 500 mostly English words for the website, being run by the culture ministry's "General Commission for Terminology".

It is expressions related to new technology that have clearly caused the greatest headache for the language experts - with an entire page on the site being devoted to the word "podcasting".

A spokesman for the Terminology Commission writes: "The word derives from the brand iPod, and its usage in French is causing some confusion.

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"The Commission recommends that the French equivalent from now on should be 'diffusion pour baladeur'."

Neither do the French appreciate the term "Wi-Fi" - easily pronouncable in French as "wee-fee" - because it is short for the English phrase "wireless fidelity".

So they recommend that France's millions of internet users say "acces sans fil a l'internet" instead.

The detailed list of words covers almost every sphere of life - with builders being told they should no longer glibly talk about "multifunctional industrial buildings" and "rise pipes", but now use "batiment industriel polyvalent" and "colonne montante".

Scientists can no longer refer to "serial analysis of gene expression" and "suppression subtractive hybridization". From now on they must say, "analyse en sirie de l'expression des genes" and "hybridation soustractive selective".

And television sports commentators are being advised to stop using the word "coach" or "corner" for football matches. They should instead say "entraineur" and "coup de pied de coin".

But the site also contains several bizarre misconceptions of words not actually used in English at all.

It recommends that people should stop referring to a snack bar as a "scramble" and start calling it a "kiosque".

And women who want a make-over must no longer ask to be "re-looked", but request to be "remodelle" instead.

A Terminology Commission spokesman said: "The list has been published because in some areas of life, people are becoming obliged to use foreign words that are not comprehensible to all, when there is always a French equivalent that will do equally well.

"French is a living language which is able to adapt in the modern world, but it is also rich enough to speak for itself, without the need for hundreds of English expressions."

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  • Lt_Ripley

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In protest I am going to stop using deja vu, baguette and errrrmm....

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sacre blur Edited by itsnotoutthere
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Merde !

Meow Purr.

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It's a desperation move to ensure some stability in a slowly dying language...

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They've always done this haven't they? I remember at school in French they were talking about trying to ban "T-shirt" and other things like that. Doesn't work, people will talk how they want.

It recommends that people should stop referring to a snack bar as a "scramble" and start calling it a "kiosque".

Isn't "kiosque" derived from the Turkish "koshk" anyway?

Zut alors

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No American, with our rampant fear of anything foreign and our "mexican immagrant crisis" has any right to comment on the French's NON LEGALLY BINDING idea of not using english words. Our right wing wackos constantly cry and whine about how american culture is being destroyed by immagration. Of course, this is ignorant irony, but they don't seem to notice that.

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Merde !

Meow Purr.

... mais cetainement, we weel alwees protect our peeple against les Saxons...

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... mais cetainement, we weel alwees protect our peeple against les Saxons...

Don't worry, I speak french. :tu:

er... cough...

Oui monsieur, why er viva la fromage..ce qui est merd, fromage? merci beaucoup.

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They've always done this haven't they? I remember at school in French they were talking about trying to ban "T-shirt" and other things like that. Doesn't work, people will talk how they want.

Isn't "kiosque" derived from the Turkish "koshk" anyway?

Zut alors

Oh, they've been doing it off and on since the 1630s, when they founded the Academie. And you're right, it has virtually no effect on the way people speak. I mean, even if the staff at Harvard told you not to call the French "Cheese-eating surrender monkeys" would that stop you from using it?

--Jaylemurph

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OUI OUI!

Hola amigo, potatas fritas por favor.

Yeah... I don't know any French words apart from the funny sounding ones.

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yeah how dare they protect their language from other influences.

That's only for Americans to insist upon like with Spanish influence/immigrants. screaming learn English !!!!

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France reacting to the English language:

linked-image

Subtitle for those in league with the preservation of the French language:

La la la je ne peux pas vous entendre!

Edited by crtbud
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No American, with our rampant fear of anything foreign and our "mexican immagrant crisis" has any right to comment on the French's NON LEGALLY BINDING idea of not using english words. Our right wing wackos constantly cry and whine about how american culture is being destroyed by immagration. Of course, this is ignorant irony, but they don't seem to notice that.

except that every american has a right to comment on whatever they want. it's in the constitution silly. french is pretty

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French is a "dead" language... it is only their fading arrogance that makes them want to cling onto it...

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I work in the software industry. The French insistance on preserving their language actually costs French consumers dearly. French is the ONLY language we can't localize easily (we localize or translate to character based langagues (bi-di) easier than French). There are certain terms that are used in computers that are universal, and English. Our French versions are the only versions that have to be nearly rebuilt and can't be put through standard translation tools (both the user interface of the software and the documentation)

Where it costs about .35 cents a word to translate a software program, French costs .75 a word, and that cost gets passed on to French consumers. Nice huh?

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except that every american has a right to comment on whatever they want. it's in the constitution silly. french is pretty

You are right. I was speaking metaphorically about not having the right to comment on the french when we elect people who try to pass laws that protect the english language from mexican influence.

Let's also not forget the things the French have given us over the years:

Fries

Kissing

Panties

thigh high stockings

Sexy maids

a chance to save them from Germans 2x

and good advice to stay out of Iraq, which we did not foloow

Edited by Neognosis
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I work in the software industry. The French insistance on preserving their language actually costs French consumers dearly. French is the ONLY language we can't localize easily (we localize or translate to character based langagues (bi-di) easier than French). There are certain terms that are used in computers that are universal, and English. Our French versions are the only versions that have to be nearly rebuilt and can't be put through standard translation tools (both the user interface of the software and the documentation)

Where it costs about .35 cents a word to translate a software program, French costs .75 a word, and that cost gets passed on to French consumers. Nice huh?

Mais oui... we 'ave it...

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You are right. I was speaking metaphorically about not having the right to comment on the french when we elect people who try to pass laws that protect the english language from mexican influence.

Do you think we should all learn to read and write in Spanish and become bi-lingual to accommodate them?

Let's also not forget the things the French have given us over the years:

Fries

Kissing

Panties

thigh high stockings

Sexy maids

a chance to save them from Germans 2x

and good advice to stay out of Iraq, which we did not foloow

You forgot cheese, the Statue of Liberty and whine…… I mean wine. :D

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I work in the software industry. The French insistance on preserving their language actually costs French consumers dearly. French is the ONLY language we can't localize easily (we localize or translate to character based langagues (bi-di) easier than French). There are certain terms that are used in computers that are universal, and English. Our French versions are the only versions that have to be nearly rebuilt and can't be put through standard translation tools (both the user interface of the software and the documentation)

Where it costs about .35 cents a word to translate a software program, French costs .75 a word, and that cost gets passed on to French consumers. Nice huh?

Maybe they should get a french company to do the work and save themselves the money.

Edited by Lt_Ripley
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You are right. I was speaking metaphorically about not having the right to comment on the french when we elect people who try to pass laws that protect the english language from mexican influence.

Let's also not forget the things the French have given us over the years:

Fries

Kissing

Panties

thigh high stockings

Sexy maids

a chance to save them from Germans 2x

and good advice to stay out of Iraq, which we did not foloow

love this video - and yes I'm French ( and Ukranian).

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and in a few years... the US government will be banning anything in mexican... and the world will laugh and point at us for trying to save our language.

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Ehn. L'académie française are kind of missing the fact that there is always going to be a slow anglo-infiltration within French culture and language. Kids these days use a plethora of Anglo Saxon terms in the french language, so I wouldn't be surprised if people forget about this story pretty quickly.

And no, French isn't a dying language. It happens to be the most popular foreign language in countries outside of the US. I suggest people check their facts :yes:

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well, seems to be very ineffective.. I am watching ARTE right now and the announcer just said: ...achetez ze woor on DeVeDe (buy The War on DVD)

Edited by questionmark
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