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Flood warnings for Britain as month's rain set to fall in 24 hours

By Caroline Gammell and James Weatherilt

Last Updated: 6:47PM BST 08/07/2008

More than a month's rain is expected to fall in 24 hours in parts of the UK on Wednesday, bringing flood warnings as summer takes a notably soggy turn.

Up to 75mm of rain is forecast in south Wales, Devon and Cornwall, compared to the average monthly rainfall for the country in July of 70mm.

The expected soaking has prompted a number of advisories from the Meteorological Office.

Met Office forecaster Helen Chivers said the heaviest rain will fall over the hills of Dartmoor, Exmoor and the Welsh valleys, putting pressure on areas already deluged by water in the past few days.

She said: "It is looking pretty wet across southern Britain and is likely to cause a few problems in places.

"We are working with the Environment Agency because over the weekend parts of the south west got 100mm of rain, so that has led to rivers rising in certain areas and given us saturated ground in some parts.

"There is a potential for flooding - where some areas have saturated ground, it could cause some problems."

Miss Chivers said the Met Office was 60 per cent confident that the south west England, the west Midlands, Hampshire, the Isle of Wight, west Berkshire and Oxfordshire would receive rain which could "cause problems".

With around 35mm of rain expected to fall in these areas, she said: "It will be heavy and people do need to be aware of it. It will probably fall for between 12 and 18 hours, so it is going to be steady rain during the day."

But she said the south and west should avoid the thunderstorms and lightning which characterised Monday's downpour. In East Anglia, more than 20mm fell at Wickhambrook in Suffolk.

A spokesman for the Meteogroup UK said the rain could prove hazardous for drivers and added that saturated ground increased the chances of flooding.

The heavy rain comes only a week after Britons enjoyed the hottest day of the year, with temperatures rising to 28 degrees Celsius.

The sun is expected to make a welcome return towards the end of the week.

Full story, source: The Telegraph

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<_< that darn dingy better inflate when i slap my lips to its valve and blow.
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Flood warnings for Britain as month's rain set to fall in 24 hours

By Caroline Gammell and James Weatherilt

Last Updated: 6:47PM BST 08/07/2008

More than a month's rain is expected to fall in 24 hours in parts of the UK on Wednesday, bringing flood warnings as summer takes a notably soggy turn.

Up to 75mm of rain is forecast in south Wales, Devon and Cornwall, compared to the average monthly rainfall for the country in July of 70mm.

The expected soaking has prompted a number of advisories from the Meteorological Office.

Met Office forecaster Helen Chivers said the heaviest rain will fall over the hills of Dartmoor, Exmoor and the Welsh valleys, putting pressure on areas already deluged by water in the past few days.

She said: "It is looking pretty wet across southern Britain and is likely to cause a few problems in places.

"We are working with the Environment Agency because over the weekend parts of the south west got 100mm of rain, so that has led to rivers rising in certain areas and given us saturated ground in some parts...........

interesting. i did something similar to tea leaves reading recenlty and the word 'flood' was perfectly shaped

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