Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Owlscrying

'Lost' beach Romans invaded in 43 AD found

Recommended Posts

Owlscrying

linked-image

The 'lost' beach where the Romans landed 2,000 years ago to begin their invasion of Britain has been uncovered by archaeologists.

The remains of the shingle harbour were buried beneath 6ft of soil nearly two miles inland from the modern Kent coast.

It lies close to the remains of the Roman fort of Richborough near Sandwich, one of the most important Roman sites in England and once the gateway to the British Isles.

At the time of the invasion Richborough sat at the southern end of the wide Wantsum Channel that separated the Isle of Thanet from mainland Britain.

Over the centuries, the channel silted up. The discovery sheds new light on how Claudius's army occupied Britain and the military tactics used to control the country.

The invasion of 43AD was one of the most significant events in British history, changing the language, culture and diet, and creating cities and towns that thrive today.

However, the location of the beach was lost centuries ago as the coastline of Kent changed. After a four-month dig on previously untouched land at Richborough, it was rediscovered on Tuesday.

At the time of the invasion, Richborough Roman Fort overlooked a sheltered lagoon.

It was the perfect safe anchorage for a fleet crossing from France. As well as becoming a port, Richborough had an amphitheatre and a 25-yard tall monumental arch celebrating the army's victory.

go

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
psyche101

Fascinating how the lay of the land has change in just 2,000 years. Just great owlscrying. You post some amazing subjects.

One rarely comments simply because the jaw dropping nature of such facts leave one with nothing to add.

Many thanks for your continued contributions. Awesome reading.

Edited by psyche101

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wickian

So 2000 years ago sea levels were high enough to encroach 2 miles further inland? Or is it the land itself that changed altitude?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1.618
So 2000 years ago sea levels were high enough to encroach 2 miles further inland? Or is it the land itself that changed altitude?

It's swings and roundabouts really. Some land is lost in places whereas in others it is gained.

Owl... Excellent find! :tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Emma_Acid
The location of the beach was lost centuries ago as the coastline of Kent changed. It was rediscovered on Tuesday.

I love how pedestrian they make it sound. :D

Great reading anyway!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mattshark
It's swings and roundabouts really. Some land is lost in places whereas in others it is gained.

Owl... Excellent find! :tu:

Yep very, it will no doubt be a beach again at some point since the south east of England is sinking due to Scotland rising thanks to the after effects of glaciation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.