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Shadow people, poltergeists or demons ?


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A man details his terrifying experiences with the unexplained during the 1980's in Toronto, Canada.

"My experiences took place in the early 80's in Toronto, Canada, and just like the fellow writing of his experiences on your site, mine also took place in a very old house. The house then was at least 75 yrs old and has since been razed to the ground and a brand new structure built in its place. When my family moved in there we experienced the same sort of events, arguments, abusive situations, strange phenomena but not to the point where we all noticed it right away. In fact my younger brother was a skeptic up to the point where things began happening to him as well. "

arrow3.gifView: Full Article | arrow3.gifSource: Phantoms and Monsters
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These are all common experiences during sleep paralysis/hypnagogic states. I have experienced every single one of these (as below, quoted from the article) and the following are links to explanations for such occurances.

I recall hearing a sound that I thought was an explosion and thinking that our stove must have exploded in the kitchen below me. I opened my eyes and looked around the room in the darkness but saw nothing to indicate anything was happening.

Exploding head syndrome is a condition that causes the sufferer to occasionally experience a tremendously loud noise as originating from within his or her own head, usually described as the sound of an explosion, roar, waves crashing against rocks, loud voices, or a ringing noise.

This noise usually occurs within an hour or two of falling asleep, but is not the result of a dream and can happen while awake as well.

Perceived as extremely loud, the sound is usually not accompanied by pain. Attacks appear to change in frequency over time, with several attacks occurring in a space of days or weeks followed by months of remission.

Sufferers often feel a sense of fear and anxiety after an attack, accompanied by elevated heart rate. Attacks are also often accompanied by perceived flashes of light (when perceived on their own, known as a "visual sleep start") or difficulty in breathing.

The condition is also known as "auditory sleep starts." It is not thought to be dangerous, although it is sometimes distressing to experience.

Exploding Head Syndrome (click to view)

Suddenly my bed began to shake violently up and down and it felt as though I was being electrocuted through my solar plexus. I couldn't move but I could see my feet moving as the bed was jumping up and down.

Symptoms of sleep paralysis can be either one of the following or a combination:

Paralysis: this occurs after waking up or shortly before falling asleep. The person cannot move any body part, and only has minimal control over blinking, breathing, and very rarely, movement of the jaw. This paralysis is the same paralysis that occurs when dreaming. The brain paralyzes the muscles to prevent possible injury during dreams, as some body parts may move during dreaming. If the person wakes up suddenly, the brain may still think that it is dreaming, and sustains the paralysis.

Hallucinations: Images or speaking that appear during the paralysis. The person may think that someone is standing beside them or they may hear strange sounds. These may be dreamlike, possibly causing the person to think that they are still dreaming. Often it is reported as feeling a weight on one's chest, as if being underneath a person or heavy object.

Sleep Paralysis (click to view)

In fact they stopped suddenly and began to swirl around in a counter clockwise direction above me and from the center of this swirl a bright white light appeared

A form constant is one of several geometric patterns which are recurringly observed during hallucinations and altered states of consciousness, like during the hypnagogic state. They are also encountered during Lucid Dreaming before the actual dream.

Form Constants (click to view)

and some voices which were like high pitched shrieks or nails on a black board said quite clearly. "The message we bring is to tell the people he is still alive."

Typical examples include a feeling of being crushed or suffocated, electric ‘tingles’ or ‘vibrations’, imagined speech and other noises, the imagined presence of a visible or invisible entity, and sometimes intense emotion: fear or euphoria and orgasmic feelings. Sleep Paralysis has been proposed as an explanation for at least some alien abduction experiences and shadow people hauntings.

Hypnagogic Hallucinations (click to view)

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Agreed!

I took the time to read a few of the stories at that site and of course the associated thread that ran thru all of them was bed or sleep. It's to the point where I dismiss any such story that involves any activity having to do with sleep.

I was intrigued however by the story about the Canadian guy who took the picture of the light/alleged alien on his remote property. Not that I think it's authentic but it is interesting.

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Agreed!

I took the time to read a few of the stories at that site and of course the associated thread that ran thru all of them was bed or sleep. It's to the point where I dismiss any such story that involves any activity having to do with sleep.

I was intrigued however by the story about the Canadian guy who took the picture of the light/alleged alien on his remote property. Not that I think it's authentic but it is interesting.

With individuals, yes sleeptime is the time when people see them. However through my few sightings, on one occasion coming back from the bathroom got into bed reached up for my blanket and Mr. Hat again was there. At this point I knew I wasnt asleep, flipped out of bed kicking at a shadow while I was flipping for the light switch. This was all before I had even heard of a shadowperson. Point is seeing that your alpha brain waves are at their lowest frequencies at rest, in my opinion and a few others as well, this puts you on that wavelength to be able to see one. Maybe I am wrong ... but as for it being a sleep thing, I have seen my booger once and knew for a fact that I was not asleep.
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I just wanted to make a correction. This article is written by a very good friend of mine. I just want to mention that she is not a man.

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With individuals, yes sleeptime is the time when people see them. However through my few sightings, on one occasion coming back from the bathroom got into bed reached up for my blanket and Mr. Hat again was there. At this point I knew I wasnt asleep, flipped out of bed kicking at a shadow while I was flipping for the light switch. This was all before I had even heard of a shadowperson. Point is seeing that your alpha brain waves are at their lowest frequencies at rest, in my opinion and a few others as well, this puts you on that wavelength to be able to see one. Maybe I am wrong ... but as for it being a sleep thing, I have seen my booger once and knew for a fact that I was not asleep.

I just wanted to say that I am not in any way trying to insult or cast dispersions on people who see these things. I'm sure you believe in your heart that this was actually happening to you but let me present this: Even when people get up in the night to go to the bathroom there is a definite possibility that they are in fact not awake at all and just in automatic pilot. Not to say they are sleepwalking but more so performing a function that doesn't really take any cognitive awareness to perform. Now, when you saw this thing in your room it may have been part of your state of suspension and it was so extreme that it did jolt you into a awareness. It is said that people see things even during a daydream while fully awake. Think of this as somewhat like being hypnotized. People that are hypnotized are typically awake and aware but also in a state of such relaxation that their subconscious comes to the forefront and blends with their conscious thoughts.

Think about what you did all during your getting up, going to the restroom, coming back, seeing said apparition and then after said encounter. What happened at each point in this series? When you get to the after point, really think hard as to what you did.

I'm sure it is an extremely terrifying situation to have happen and I sympathize with all who have dealt with this.

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Said Authoress of article quoted in the beginning of this thread says:

In fact during the experience with the globes of light I literally looked away and pinched myself vigorously on the arm so as to assure myself I was not asleep. I even wrote it down in my journal in case I should think I was imagining the experience the next day.

This experience according to my alarm clock took place over the course of an hour and a half. At the time I wished I was asleep dreaming but that was not the case at all. I lay in my bed with my eyes like saucers waiting for the fear to subside so I could go to the bathroom. My light was on and I was very lucid.

I do understand the tendency of most people to dismiss these experiences as sleep related, ie dreams, hypnagogic states and sleep paralysis, as I too was inclined to dismiss them out of a base fear that this could be in my reality. But just because we wish something to be other than what it is does not make it so. And some of my experiences took place away from my bedroom and any sleep related experience. The world and all its contents are not without mystery and everything cannot be explained away by science, much to the dismay of Stephen Hawking and those of his ilk.

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Said Authoress of article quoted in the beginning of this thread says:

In fact during the experience with the globes of light I literally looked away and pinched myself vigorously on the arm so as to assure myself I was not asleep. I even wrote it down in my journal in case I should think I was imagining the experience the next day.

This experience according to my alarm clock took place over the course of an hour and a half. At the time I wished I was asleep dreaming but that was not the case at all. I lay in my bed with my eyes like saucers waiting for the fear to subside so I could go to the bathroom. My light was on and I was very lucid.

I do understand the tendency of most people to dismiss these experiences as sleep related, ie dreams, hypnagogic states and sleep paralysis, as I too was inclined to dismiss them out of a base fear that this could be in my reality. But just because we wish something to be other than what it is does not make it so. And some of my experiences took place away from my bedroom and any sleep related experience. The world and all its contents are not without mystery and everything cannot be explained away by science, much to the dismay of Stephen Hawking and those of his ilk.

Wishing has nothing to do with it. I stand by my assertion but I am not in any way saying something paranormal can't happen to anyone. Also, a globe of light, which if you are in a heightened state can be attributed to many things. The more serious of his experiences are IMO sleep induced if not all.

Example: Just two days ago I was "asleep" and woke up to check the clock, it said 5:05am. I then lay there for about 10 minutes and checked it again, it said 5:12am. I then decided to get out of bed for work in 5 minutes. About 7 to 10 minutes went by and I finally dragged myself up. As I looked at the clock again it now read 4:26am. It was then that I realized I hadn't really checked the clock the first two times at all but it seemed as real as me sitting here writing this now. Had I not looked at the clock the third (real) time, I would have gone on thinking that I had really woken up those first two times. I've had more extreme situations where I was absolutely sure I was awake and walking around a room putting things away.

As I said, I'm not trying to discount your experiences but you should really do some study of the capabilities of the human brain. You'd be amazed.

Finally, I had a friend over at ATS.com that worked in a sleep study center. They literally watched people sleep thru a window and monitored them. He told me stories that people would tell him and say they must have been up during the night and doing this or that. A couple have said they woke up and saw apparitions and couldn't get back to sleep from fear until dozing off after 2+ hours. Guess what? All of these subjects slept thru the night without waking or rising from bed. But they could have swore.....

Edited by jbondo
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These are all common experiences during sleep paralysis/hypnagogic states. I have experienced every single one of these (as below, quoted from the article) and the following are links to explanations for such occurances.

Exploding head syndrome is a condition that causes the sufferer to occasionally experience a tremendously loud noise as originating from within his or her own head, usually described as the sound of an explosion, roar, waves crashing against rocks, loud voices, or a ringing noise.

This noise usually occurs within an hour or two of falling asleep, but is not the result of a dream and can happen while awake as well.

Perceived as extremely loud, the sound is usually not accompanied by pain. Attacks appear to change in frequency over time, with several attacks occurring in a space of days or weeks followed by months of remission.

Sufferers often feel a sense of fear and anxiety after an attack, accompanied by elevated heart rate. Attacks are also often accompanied by perceived flashes of light (when perceived on their own, known as a "visual sleep start") or difficulty in breathing.

The condition is also known as "auditory sleep starts." It is not thought to be dangerous, although it is sometimes distressing to experience.

Exploding Head Syndrome (click to view)

Symptoms of sleep paralysis can be either one of the following or a combination:

Paralysis: this occurs after waking up or shortly before falling asleep. The person cannot move any body part, and only has minimal control over blinking, breathing, and very rarely, movement of the jaw. This paralysis is the same paralysis that occurs when dreaming. The brain paralyzes the muscles to prevent possible injury during dreams, as some body parts may move during dreaming. If the person wakes up suddenly, the brain may still think that it is dreaming, and sustains the paralysis.

Hallucinations: Images or speaking that appear during the paralysis. The person may think that someone is standing beside them or they may hear strange sounds. These may be dreamlike, possibly causing the person to think that they are still dreaming. Often it is reported as feeling a weight on one's chest, as if being underneath a person or heavy object.

Sleep Paralysis (click to view)

A form constant is one of several geometric patterns which are recurringly observed during hallucinations and altered states of consciousness, like during the hypnagogic state. They are also encountered during Lucid Dreaming before the actual dream.

Form Constants (click to view)

Typical examples include a feeling of being crushed or suffocated, electric ‘tingles’ or ‘vibrations’, imagined speech and other noises, the imagined presence of a visible or invisible entity, and sometimes intense emotion: fear or euphoria and orgasmic feelings. Sleep Paralysis has been proposed as an explanation for at least some alien abduction experiences and shadow people hauntings.

Hypnagogic Hallucinations (click to view)

In state of hypnogonia, one can nevertheless control her/his vision, dream ...

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A couple have said they woke up and saw apparitions and couldn't get back to sleep from fear until dozing off after 2+ hours. Guess what? All of these subjects slept thru the night without waking or rising from bed. But they could have swore.....

Yes I've had these experiences as well. Waking up later and realizing I'd dreamed the whole thing. In these instances I've stated here however there was no waking up later. And as a mother who's gone through having to get up in the middle of the night to feed infants I'm very very familiar with the feeling of being awake and of being asleep. Fortunately I don't have to rely on sleep studies or others to verify what has or has not happened.

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If a person tells me a crazy story and prefaces it by saying, "I know how crazy this sound, but . . .", I treat the story as just that. A story. Stories aren't true or false. They're just well-told and entertaining, or badly told and not. Story-tellers aren't liars (in the derogatory sense) unless they try to cash in on their stories and the stories aren't well-told. If so, they're entertainers. If not, then they're conmen.

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I just wanted to say that I am not in any way trying to insult or cast dispersions on people who see these things. I'm sure you believe in your heart that this was actually happening to you but let me present this: Even when people get up in the night to go to the bathroom there is a definite possibility that they are in fact not awake at all and just in automatic pilot. Not to say they are sleepwalking but more so performing a function that doesn't really take any cognitive awareness to perform. Now, when you saw this thing in your room it may have been part of your state of suspension and it was so extreme that it did jolt you into a awareness. It is said that people see things even during a daydream while fully awake. Think of this as somewhat like being hypnotized. People that are hypnotized are typically awake and aware but also in a state of such relaxation that their subconscious comes to the forefront and blends with their conscious thoughts.

Think about what you did all during your getting up, going to the restroom, coming back, seeing said apparition and then after said encounter. What happened at each point in this series? When you get to the after point, really think hard as to what you did.

I'm sure it is an extremely terrifying situation to have happen and I sympathize with all who have dealt with this.

Yes ... I was awake. I am also going to say that with knowledge I have no lingering fear of shadow people.

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  • 2 weeks later...

it may be something of the mind or the other thing .but i think something esle had happen to those kid.don't known what

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  • 1 year later...

Several principles based in science can be used to explain reports of shadow people, including optical illusions or hallucinations brought on by physiological/psychological circumstances, drug use, and the interaction of external agents on the human body.

When a specific region of the brain called the left temporoparietal junction is stimulated, it can create the illusion of a shadow person.[9]

Images seen in peripheral areas of vision can be caused by pareidolia, a condition in which the brain incorrectly interprets random patterns of light/shadow or texture as being familiar patterns such as faces and human forms.[10] The same condition can also be observed in macular vision in low light conditions, or when viewing a complex but random image. A common example would be perceiving a shadow, thrown by an item of furniture in a darkened room, as being a person.

Hypnagogia, also known as "waking-sleep", a physiological condition in which a person is part-way between sleeping and waking, can also account for such perceptions.[11] During hypnagogia, a person can be conscious and aware of their environment, but also in a dream-like state where they can perceive images from their subconscious. People experiencing waking-sleep commonly report the sensation of lights or shadows moving around them, as well as other visual hallucinations. A feeling of dread is also a sensation that occurs when experiencing hypnagogia. Hypnagogia is sometimes known as 'the faces in the dark phenomenon' because those who experience this state commonly report seeing faces while experiencing waking-sleep.[12] Similar hypotheses have been put forward linking this condition to a number of other apparent paranormal experiences, including alien abductions, paranormal nocturnal visitations, and religious experiences such as contact with angels or demons.

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