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Doggerland


Sceptical believer

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7 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

And what makes you think that?

There's not much if anything left of Paleo Sardinian.

Johannes Hubschmid

Max Leopold Wagner

Ewardo Blasco Ferrer

All have papers on it on Academia. Hubschmid has a interesting one showing about 6 layers of languages including Nuargic. 

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1 hour ago, Piney said:

How many Jews do you know and did you actually learn about Old Testament history from a Rabbi and professor in Jewish history?

I did and your talking out of your ass now. I also taught religious history for Friends School.

Everybody borrowed from each others religion in the Middle East. Especially the Hebrews and they borrowed their flood story from the Sumerian Siusudra tale from Southern Babylon. 

 

 

Maybe you missed my genetics chart…no, I don’t think they borrowed it from anyone tbh.

 

76A7C4FE-F246-43C4-8B62-B901C70C2C62.jpeg

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1 minute ago, The Puzzler said:

Maybe you missed my genetics chart…no, I don’t think they borrowed it from anyone tbh.

 

76A7C4FE-F246-43C4-8B62-B901C70C2C62.jpeg

K was Anatolian Farmers. Period. 

And Hebrews as a ethnic group didn't even exist then. 

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3 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Maybe you missed my genetics chart…no, I don’t think they borrowed it from anyone tbh.

The Hebrews were the least developed of the Canaanites. They were mountain herders who neither practiced their own metallurgy or building and they borrowed from everyone.

 

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8 minutes ago, Piney said:

K was Anatolian Farmers. Period. 

And Hebrews as a ethnic group didn't even exist then. 

K is Anatolian farmers it seems on first glance. It’s a back migration. We find K in Spain way before that now. Syria is not the first place anymore, It’s a big move, from flooding Atlantic seaboard to Mesopotamia where K appears, very early no doubt, so imo that is likely the diaspora came from Spain. 

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7 minutes ago, Piney said:

The Hebrews were the least developed of the Canaanites. They were mountain herders who neither practiced their own metallurgy or building and they borrowed from everyone.

 

Nooo, you’re not looking at a bigger picture, reduced to that, because they had to start again, after a great inundation to their original homelands…and I’m not talking the Persian Gulf…but it’s ok Piney, I’m not saying I’m right, just things that make me go hmmmm

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1 minute ago, The Puzzler said:

K is Anatolian farmers it seems on first glance. But we find K in Spain way before that now. Syria is not the first place anymore, It’s a big move, from flooding Atlantic seaboard to Mesopotamia where K appears, very early no doubt, but no earlier, in fact, less earlier than it appears on Spain, but that is likely what occurred. 

X traveled further.

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2 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Nooo, you’re not looking at a bigger picture, reduced to that, because they had to start again, after a great inundation to their original homelands…and I’m not talking the Persian Gulf…but it’s ok Piney, I’m saying I’m right, just things that make me go hmmmm

Your not in the least bit correct...

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12 minutes ago, Piney said:

Your not in the least bit correct...

This guy was immediately banned, but anyway…here’s a few cognates…

Cognates between Hebrew and Basque

 

Hebrew: Kap [כף ](Handle) / Basque: esku (Hand)

Hebrew: Zan ן] [ (to eat) / Basque: Jan (to eat)

Hebrew: Gibor [גבר] (Man) / Basque: Gizon (Boy)

Hebrew: Dam [דם] (Blood) / Basque: Odol (Blood)

Hebrew: Gabona [גבוה] (High) / Basque: Goi (High) – Gabon (Night)

Hebrew: Sham [שם] (Name) / Basque: Izen (Name)

Hebrew: Zeh [זה] (It is) / Basque: Zen (It was)

Hebrew: Aur [אור] (Light) / Basque: Argi (Light)

Hebrew: Lamul [לַעֲמוֹל] (Work)/ Basque: Lan (Work)

Hebrew: Chipor [ציפור] (Bird) / Basque: Txori (Bird)

Hebrew: Bicar [בוקר] (Morning) / Basque: Bihar (Tomorrow)

Hebrew: Arim [ערים] (City) / Basque: Hiri (City)

Hebrew: Garain [גַרעִין] (Seed) / Basque: Garia (Wheat)

Hebrew: Hertaj [הַרחֵק] (Far) / Basque: Hurrun (Far)

Hebrew: Dalet [דלת] (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Hebrew: Iram [יֶרַח] (Month/Moon) / Basque: Ila (Month/Moon)

 

Proto-Sinaitic: Bayt (House) / Basque: etxe (House)

Proto-Sinaitic: Gaml (Throwstick) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Dalet (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Proto-Sinaitic: He (Window) Basque: Lehio (Window)

Proto-Sinaitic: Waw (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Proto-Sinaitic: Zayin (Weapon) / Basque: Zakil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Het (Wall) / Basque: Harresi (Wall)

Proto-Sinaitic: Tet (Wheel) / Basque: Urte (Year)

Proto-Sinaitic: Yod (Hand) / Basque: Goi (High)

Proto-Sinaitic: Kap (Palm of hand) / Basque. Esku (Hand)

Proto-Sinaitic: Lamed (Goad) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Mem (Water) / Mendi (Mountain)

Proto-Sinaitic: Nun (Serpent) / Basque: Musker (Lizard)

Proto-Sinaitic: Samek (Fish) / Basque: Arrain (Fish)

Proto-Sinaitic: Ayin (Eye) / Basque: Begi (Eye)

Proto-Sinaitic: Pe (Mouth) / Basque: Aurpegi (Face)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sade (Hunt) / Basque: Ehiza (Hunt)

Proto-Sinaitic: Qop (Monkey) / Basque: Kimu (Monkey)

Proto-Sinaitic: Rus (Head) / Basque: Buru (Head)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sin (Fire) / Basque: Su (Fire)

Proto-Sinaitic: Taw (Mark) / Basque: Idatz (Write)

 

More cognates:

Hebrew: Berekh (Kneel down) / Basque: Belhaurikatu (Kneel down)

Hebrew: Kaabheedh (Liver) / Basque: Gibel (Liver)

Hebrew: Apel (Black) / Basque: Beltz (Black)

Hebrew: Bharzel (Iron) / Basque: Burdin (Iron)

Hebrew: Hatorra (Cloak) / Basque: Jatorra (Nice)

Hebrew: Hahaz (to hold) / Basque: Hastatu (to use)

Hebrew: Hakal (to eat) / Basque: Haragi (Meat)

Hebrew: Hal (tail) / Basque: Haria (tail)

Hebrew: Hama (maid) / Basque: Eme (Female)

Hebrew: Hany (Me) / Basque: Ni (Me)

Hebrew: Hanas (to force) / Basque: Eraso (Attack)

Hebrew: Hezebah (Finger) / Basque: Behatz (Finger)

Hebrew: Badal (Go away) / Basque: Bidali (to send)

Hebrew: Bahar (to burn up) / Basque: Bero (hot)

Hebrew: Baqar (to cut) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

Hebrew: Basar (to cheer) / Basque: Poz (Happiness)

Hebrew: Galalah (Dung) / Basque: Ogal (Excrement)

Hebrew: Garagar (Berry) / Basque: Garagar (Beer)

Hebrew: Garezen (axe) / Basque: Aizkora (Ax)

Hebrew: Din (Judge) / Basque: Doi (Just)

Hebrew: Hadah (to put out) / Basque: Hedatu (to expand)

Hebrew: Halah (to go out) / Basque: Jalki (to wake up)

Hebrew: Zahar (to shine) / Basque: Izar (Star)

Hebrew: Zar (Stranger) / Basque: Atzerri (Foreign land)

Hebrew: Hagar (Bind around) / Basque: Gerri (Waist)

Hebrew: Hakhah (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Hebrew: Hemehah (Chesse) / Basque: Mamia (Cream)

Hebrew: Hopar (Dig) / Basque: Habiratu (to bury)

Hebrew: Harras (to cut) / Basque: Haratz (Cutting tool)

Hebrew: Yebwl (to produce) / Basque: Bildu (to collect)

Hebrew: Yabal (River) / Basque: Ibai (River)

Hebrew: Yagah (to labor) / Basque: Akhitu (to fatigue)

Hebrew: Yagor (to fear) / Basque: Ikhara (Fear)

Hebrew: Yakol (to be able) / Basque: Ahal (to be able)

Hebrew: Yoser (Right) / Basque: Zor (Duty)

Hebrew: Kasal (Stupid) / Basque: Asto (Donkey)

Hebrew: Laban (to purify) / Basque: Laban (Knife)

Hebrew: Lwz (Hazel) / Basque: Urritz (Hazel tree)

Hebrew: Maqqel (Rod) / Basque: Makila (Stick)

Hebrew: Nahaz (to deride) / Basque: Nausatu (to deride)

Hebrew: Nagah (to touch) / Basque: Hunkitu (to touch)

Hebrew: Nagar (Tears) / Basque: Negar (Tear)

Hebrew: Nagas (to urge) / Basque: Nahas (to disturb)

Hebrew: Nepes (Life) / Basque: Bizi (Life)

Hebrew: Nazal (to deliver) / Basque: Itzul (to return)

Hebrew: Nezer (to branch) / Basque: Ozi (to germinate)

Hebrew: Neqeh (White) / Basque: Negu (Winter)

Hebrew: Nasah (to forget) / Basque: Ahaztu (to forget)

Hebrew: Nasak (to bite) / Basque: Hozka (to bite)

Hebrew: Sabal (pregnant) / Basque: Sabel (Belly)

Hebrew: Sagar (close) / Basque: Maskor (Shell)

Hebrew: Sakan (to know) / Basque: Ezagun (to know)

Hebrew: Sas (moth) / Basque: Satsa (Moth)

Hebrew: Satar (to cover) / Basque: estali (to cover)

Hebrew: Hamar ( to heap together) / Basque: Hamarratu (to tie)

Hebrew: Hamar (collection) / Basque: Hamar (Ten)

Hebrew: Hez (Tree) / Basque: Hosto (Leaf)

Hebrew: Hazeh (Backbone) / Basque: Atze (Back)

Hebrew: Hazam (to be strong) / Basque: Hezur (Bone)

Hebrew: Harab (Sweat) / Basque: Alaba (Sister)

Hebrew: Horep (the neck) / Basque: Lepo (the neck)

Hebrew: Harak (to arrange) / Basque: erkatu (to compare)

Hebrew: Haraz (to frigthen) / Basque. irrintzi ( to shout)

Hebrew: Hasat (to think) / Basque: uste (to think)

Hebrew: Hatar (to pray) / Basque: Otoitz (Pray)

Hebrew: Zohn (Sheep) / Basque: Ahuntz (Sheep)

Hebrew: Zeby (Splendor) / Basque: Zeru (Sky)

Hebrew: Azebah (Wet) / Basque: Busti (to wet)

Hebrew: Ziheh (to dry) / Basque: Txukun (to dry)

Hebrew: Zanam (to dry) / Basque: Zimel (Dry)

Hebrew: Zahar (Small) / Basque: Xehe (Thin)

Hebrew: Zor (Knife) / Basque: Zorrotza (Sharpened)

Hebrew: Qwm (to ride) / Basque: Gora (to rise)

Hebrew: Qaton (Little) / Basque: Gutxi (Little)

Hebrew: Qalah (to parch) / Basque: Kiskali (to parch)

Hebrew: Qen (Chambers) / Basque: Gela (Room)

Hebrew: Qanah (to burn) / Basque: Kar (Flame)

Hebrew: Qazah (All) / Basque: Guzti (All)

Hebrew: Qaroub (Near) / Basque: Hurbil (Near)

Hebrew: Qerah (Ice) / Basque: Txindor (ice)

Hebrew: Ravah (to drink) / Basque: Ura (Water)

Hebrew: Sakal (Intelligent) / Basque: Ikasi (to learn)

Hebrew: Sapah (Lip) / Basque: Ezpaina (Lip)

Hebrew: Soulal (Naked) / Basque: Soil (Naked)

Hebrew: Saken (Neighbor) / Basque: Auzoko (Neihbour)

Hebrew: Saqar (Lie) / Basque: Gezur (Lie) - Zakar (Bad)

Hebrew: Sores (Root) / Basque: Sustrai (Root)

Proto-semitic: Bak (Divide) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

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1 minute ago, The Puzzler said:

This guy was immediately banned, but anyway…here’s a few cognates…

Cognates between Hebrew and Basque

 

Hebrew: Kap [כף ](Handle) / Basque: esku (Hand)

Hebrew: Zan ן] [ (to eat) / Basque: Jan (to eat)

Hebrew: Gibor [גבר] (Man) / Basque: Gizon (Boy)

Hebrew: Dam [דם] (Blood) / Basque: Odol (Blood)

Hebrew: Gabona [גבוה] (High) / Basque: Goi (High) – Gabon (Night)

Hebrew: Sham [שם] (Name) / Basque: Izen (Name)

Hebrew: Zeh [זה] (It is) / Basque: Zen (It was)

Hebrew: Aur [אור] (Light) / Basque: Argi (Light)

Hebrew: Lamul [לַעֲמוֹל] (Work)/ Basque: Lan (Work)

Hebrew: Chipor [ציפור] (Bird) / Basque: Txori (Bird)

Hebrew: Bicar [בוקר] (Morning) / Basque: Bihar (Tomorrow)

Hebrew: Arim [ערים] (City) / Basque: Hiri (City)

Hebrew: Garain [גַרעִין] (Seed) / Basque: Garia (Wheat)

Hebrew: Hertaj [הַרחֵק] (Far) / Basque: Hurrun (Far)

Hebrew: Dalet [דלת] (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Hebrew: Iram [יֶרַח] (Month/Moon) / Basque: Ila (Month/Moon)

 

 

https://i.redd.it/9shuefgmkrd21.png

 

 

Do you know more cognates between Hebrew and Basque or any other semitic and pre-indoeuropean language?

https://i.redd.it/7914wti7wrd21.png

Proto-Sinaitic: Bayt (House) / Basque: etxe (House)

Proto-Sinaitic: Gaml (Throwstick) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Dalet (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Proto-Sinaitic: He (Window) Basque: Lehio (Window)

Proto-Sinaitic: Waw (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Proto-Sinaitic: Zayin (Weapon) / Basque: Zakil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Het (Wall) / Basque: Harresi (Wall)

Proto-Sinaitic: Tet (Wheel) / Basque: Urte (Year)

Proto-Sinaitic: Yod (Hand) / Basque: Goi (High)

Proto-Sinaitic: Kap (Palm of hand) / Basque. Esku (Hand)

Proto-Sinaitic: Lamed (Goad) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Mem (Water) / Mendi (Mountain)

Proto-Sinaitic: Nun (Serpent) / Basque: Musker (Lizard)

Proto-Sinaitic: Samek (Fish) / Basque: Arrain (Fish)

Proto-Sinaitic: Ayin (Eye) / Basque: Begi (Eye)

Proto-Sinaitic: Pe (Mouth) / Basque: Aurpegi (Face)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sade (Hunt) / Basque: Ehiza (Hunt)

Proto-Sinaitic: Qop (Monkey) / Basque: Kimu (Monkey)

Proto-Sinaitic: Rus (Head) / Basque: Buru (Head)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sin (Fire) / Basque: Su (Fire)

Proto-Sinaitic: Taw (Mark) / Basque: Idatz (Write)

 

More cognates:

Hebrew: Berekh (Kneel down) / Basque: Belhaurikatu (Kneel down)

Hebrew: Kaabheedh (Liver) / Basque: Gibel (Liver)

Hebrew: Apel (Black) / Basque: Beltz (Black)

Hebrew: Bharzel (Iron) / Basque: Burdin (Iron)

Hebrew: Hatorra (Cloak) / Basque: Jatorra (Nice)

Hebrew: Hahaz (to hold) / Basque: Hastatu (to use)

Hebrew: Hakal (to eat) / Basque: Haragi (Meat)

Hebrew: Hal (tail) / Basque: Haria (tail)

Hebrew: Hama (maid) / Basque: Eme (Female)

Hebrew: Hany (Me) / Basque: Ni (Me)

Hebrew: Hanas (to force) / Basque: Eraso (Attack)

Hebrew: Hezebah (Finger) / Basque: Behatz (Finger)

Hebrew: Badal (Go away) / Basque: Bidali (to send)

Hebrew: Bahar (to burn up) / Basque: Bero (hot)

Hebrew: Baqar (to cut) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

Hebrew: Basar (to cheer) / Basque: Poz (Happiness)

Hebrew: Galalah (Dung) / Basque: Ogal (Excrement)

Hebrew: Garagar (Berry) / Basque: Garagar (Beer)

Hebrew: Garezen (axe) / Basque: Aizkora (Ax)

Hebrew: Din (Judge) / Basque: Doi (Just)

Hebrew: Hadah (to put out) / Basque: Hedatu (to expand)

Hebrew: Halah (to go out) / Basque: Jalki (to wake up)

Hebrew: Zahar (to shine) / Basque: Izar (Star)

Hebrew: Zar (Stranger) / Basque: Atzerri (Foreign land)

Hebrew: Hagar (Bind around) / Basque: Gerri (Waist)

Hebrew: Hakhah (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Hebrew: Hemehah (Chesse) / Basque: Mamia (Cream)

Hebrew: Hopar (Dig) / Basque: Habiratu (to bury)

Hebrew: Harras (to cut) / Basque: Haratz (Cutting tool)

Hebrew: Yebwl (to produce) / Basque: Bildu (to collect)

Hebrew: Yabal (River) / Basque: Ibai (River)

Hebrew: Yagah (to labor) / Basque: Akhitu (to fatigue)

Hebrew: Yagor (to fear) / Basque: Ikhara (Fear)

Hebrew: Yakol (to be able) / Basque: Ahal (to be able)

Hebrew: Yoser (Right) / Basque: Zor (Duty)

Hebrew: Kasal (Stupid) / Basque: Asto (Donkey)

Hebrew: Laban (to purify) / Basque: Laban (Knife)

Hebrew: Lwz (Hazel) / Basque: Urritz (Hazel tree)

Hebrew: Maqqel (Rod) / Basque: Makila (Stick)

Hebrew: Nahaz (to deride) / Basque: Nausatu (to deride)

Hebrew: Nagah (to touch) / Basque: Hunkitu (to touch)

Hebrew: Nagar (Tears) / Basque: Negar (Tear)

Hebrew: Nagas (to urge) / Basque: Nahas (to disturb)

Hebrew: Nepes (Life) / Basque: Bizi (Life)

Hebrew: Nazal (to deliver) / Basque: Itzul (to return)

Hebrew: Nezer (to branch) / Basque: Ozi (to germinate)

Hebrew: Neqeh (White) / Basque: Negu (Winter)

Hebrew: Nasah (to forget) / Basque: Ahaztu (to forget)

Hebrew: Nasak (to bite) / Basque: Hozka (to bite)

Hebrew: Sabal (pregnant) / Basque: Sabel (Belly)

Hebrew: Sagar (close) / Basque: Maskor (Shell)

Hebrew: Sakan (to know) / Basque: Ezagun (to know)

Hebrew: Sas (moth) / Basque: Satsa (Moth)

Hebrew: Satar (to cover) / Basque: estali (to cover)

Hebrew: Hamar ( to heap together) / Basque: Hamarratu (to tie)

Hebrew: Hamar (collection) / Basque: Hamar (Ten)

Hebrew: Hez (Tree) / Basque: Hosto (Leaf)

Hebrew: Hazeh (Backbone) / Basque: Atze (Back)

Hebrew: Hazam (to be strong) / Basque: Hezur (Bone)

Hebrew: Harab (Sweat) / Basque: Alaba (Sister)

Hebrew: Horep (the neck) / Basque: Lepo (the neck)

Hebrew: Harak (to arrange) / Basque: erkatu (to compare)

Hebrew: Haraz (to frigthen) / Basque. irrintzi ( to shout)

Hebrew: Hasat (to think) / Basque: uste (to think)

Hebrew: Hatar (to pray) / Basque: Otoitz (Pray)

Hebrew: Zohn (Sheep) / Basque: Ahuntz (Sheep)

Hebrew: Zeby (Splendor) / Basque: Zeru (Sky)

Hebrew: Azebah (Wet) / Basque: Busti (to wet)

Hebrew: Ziheh (to dry) / Basque: Txukun (to dry)

Hebrew: Zanam (to dry) / Basque: Zimel (Dry)

Hebrew: Zahar (Small) / Basque: Xehe (Thin)

Hebrew: Zor (Knife) / Basque: Zorrotza (Sharpened)

Hebrew: Qwm (to ride) / Basque: Gora (to rise)

Hebrew: Qaton (Little) / Basque: Gutxi (Little)

Hebrew: Qalah (to parch) / Basque: Kiskali (to parch)

Hebrew: Qen (Chambers) / Basque: Gela (Room)

Hebrew: Qanah (to burn) / Basque: Kar (Flame)

Hebrew: Qazah (All) / Basque: Guzti (All)

Hebrew: Qaroub (Near) / Basque: Hurbil (Near)

Hebrew: Qerah (Ice) / Basque: Txindor (ice)

Hebrew: Ravah (to drink) / Basque: Ura (Water)

Hebrew: Sakal (Intelligent) / Basque: Ikasi (to learn)

Hebrew: Sapah (Lip) / Basque: Ezpaina (Lip)

Hebrew: Soulal (Naked) / Basque: Soil (Naked)

Hebrew: Saken (Neighbor) / Basque: Auzoko (Neihbour)

Hebrew: Saqar (Lie) / Basque: Gezur (Lie) - Zakar (Bad)

Hebrew: Sores (Root) / Basque: Sustrai (Root)

Proto-semitic: Bak (Divide) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

I see nothing but "mass comparison" and being banned doesn't look good from any perspective.

The Vascones aren't Semites..

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21 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

This guy was immediately banned, but anyway…here’s a few cognates…

Cognates between Hebrew and Basque

 

Hebrew: Kap [כף ](Handle) / Basque: esku (Hand)

Hebrew: Zan ן] [ (to eat) / Basque: Jan (to eat)

Hebrew: Gibor [גבר] (Man) / Basque: Gizon (Boy)

Hebrew: Dam [דם] (Blood) / Basque: Odol (Blood)

Hebrew: Gabona [גבוה] (High) / Basque: Goi (High) – Gabon (Night)

Hebrew: Sham [שם] (Name) / Basque: Izen (Name)

Hebrew: Zeh [זה] (It is) / Basque: Zen (It was)

Hebrew: Aur [אור] (Light) / Basque: Argi (Light)

Hebrew: Lamul [לַעֲמוֹל] (Work)/ Basque: Lan (Work)

Hebrew: Chipor [ציפור] (Bird) / Basque: Txori (Bird)

Hebrew: Bicar [בוקר] (Morning) / Basque: Bihar (Tomorrow)

Hebrew: Arim [ערים] (City) / Basque: Hiri (City)

Hebrew: Garain [גַרעִין] (Seed) / Basque: Garia (Wheat)

Hebrew: Hertaj [הַרחֵק] (Far) / Basque: Hurrun (Far)

Hebrew: Dalet [דלת] (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Hebrew: Iram [יֶרַח] (Month/Moon) / Basque: Ila (Month/Moon)

 

Proto-Sinaitic: Bayt (House) / Basque: etxe (House)

Proto-Sinaitic: Gaml (Throwstick) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Dalet (Door) / Basque: Ate (Door)

Proto-Sinaitic: He (Window) Basque: Lehio (Window)

Proto-Sinaitic: Waw (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Proto-Sinaitic: Zayin (Weapon) / Basque: Zakil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Het (Wall) / Basque: Harresi (Wall)

Proto-Sinaitic: Tet (Wheel) / Basque: Urte (Year)

Proto-Sinaitic: Yod (Hand) / Basque: Goi (High)

Proto-Sinaitic: Kap (Palm of hand) / Basque. Esku (Hand)

Proto-Sinaitic: Lamed (Goad) / Basque: Makil (Stick)

Proto-Sinaitic: Mem (Water) / Mendi (Mountain)

Proto-Sinaitic: Nun (Serpent) / Basque: Musker (Lizard)

Proto-Sinaitic: Samek (Fish) / Basque: Arrain (Fish)

Proto-Sinaitic: Ayin (Eye) / Basque: Begi (Eye)

Proto-Sinaitic: Pe (Mouth) / Basque: Aurpegi (Face)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sade (Hunt) / Basque: Ehiza (Hunt)

Proto-Sinaitic: Qop (Monkey) / Basque: Kimu (Monkey)

Proto-Sinaitic: Rus (Head) / Basque: Buru (Head)

Proto-Sinaitic: Sin (Fire) / Basque: Su (Fire)

Proto-Sinaitic: Taw (Mark) / Basque: Idatz (Write)

 

More cognates:

Hebrew: Berekh (Kneel down) / Basque: Belhaurikatu (Kneel down)

Hebrew: Kaabheedh (Liver) / Basque: Gibel (Liver)

Hebrew: Apel (Black) / Basque: Beltz (Black)

Hebrew: Bharzel (Iron) / Basque: Burdin (Iron)

Hebrew: Hatorra (Cloak) / Basque: Jatorra (Nice)

Hebrew: Hahaz (to hold) / Basque: Hastatu (to use)

Hebrew: Hakal (to eat) / Basque: Haragi (Meat)

Hebrew: Hal (tail) / Basque: Haria (tail)

Hebrew: Hama (maid) / Basque: Eme (Female)

Hebrew: Hany (Me) / Basque: Ni (Me)

Hebrew: Hanas (to force) / Basque: Eraso (Attack)

Hebrew: Hezebah (Finger) / Basque: Behatz (Finger)

Hebrew: Badal (Go away) / Basque: Bidali (to send)

Hebrew: Bahar (to burn up) / Basque: Bero (hot)

Hebrew: Baqar (to cut) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

Hebrew: Basar (to cheer) / Basque: Poz (Happiness)

Hebrew: Galalah (Dung) / Basque: Ogal (Excrement)

Hebrew: Garagar (Berry) / Basque: Garagar (Beer)

Hebrew: Garezen (axe) / Basque: Aizkora (Ax)

Hebrew: Din (Judge) / Basque: Doi (Just)

Hebrew: Hadah (to put out) / Basque: Hedatu (to expand)

Hebrew: Halah (to go out) / Basque: Jalki (to wake up)

Hebrew: Zahar (to shine) / Basque: Izar (Star)

Hebrew: Zar (Stranger) / Basque: Atzerri (Foreign land)

Hebrew: Hagar (Bind around) / Basque: Gerri (Waist)

Hebrew: Hakhah (Hook) / Basque: Kako (Hook)

Hebrew: Hemehah (Chesse) / Basque: Mamia (Cream)

Hebrew: Hopar (Dig) / Basque: Habiratu (to bury)

Hebrew: Harras (to cut) / Basque: Haratz (Cutting tool)

Hebrew: Yebwl (to produce) / Basque: Bildu (to collect)

Hebrew: Yabal (River) / Basque: Ibai (River)

Hebrew: Yagah (to labor) / Basque: Akhitu (to fatigue)

Hebrew: Yagor (to fear) / Basque: Ikhara (Fear)

Hebrew: Yakol (to be able) / Basque: Ahal (to be able)

Hebrew: Yoser (Right) / Basque: Zor (Duty)

Hebrew: Kasal (Stupid) / Basque: Asto (Donkey)

Hebrew: Laban (to purify) / Basque: Laban (Knife)

Hebrew: Lwz (Hazel) / Basque: Urritz (Hazel tree)

Hebrew: Maqqel (Rod) / Basque: Makila (Stick)

Hebrew: Nahaz (to deride) / Basque: Nausatu (to deride)

Hebrew: Nagah (to touch) / Basque: Hunkitu (to touch)

Hebrew: Nagar (Tears) / Basque: Negar (Tear)

Hebrew: Nagas (to urge) / Basque: Nahas (to disturb)

Hebrew: Nepes (Life) / Basque: Bizi (Life)

Hebrew: Nazal (to deliver) / Basque: Itzul (to return)

Hebrew: Nezer (to branch) / Basque: Ozi (to germinate)

Hebrew: Neqeh (White) / Basque: Negu (Winter)

Hebrew: Nasah (to forget) / Basque: Ahaztu (to forget)

Hebrew: Nasak (to bite) / Basque: Hozka (to bite)

Hebrew: Sabal (pregnant) / Basque: Sabel (Belly)

Hebrew: Sagar (close) / Basque: Maskor (Shell)

Hebrew: Sakan (to know) / Basque: Ezagun (to know)

Hebrew: Sas (moth) / Basque: Satsa (Moth)

Hebrew: Satar (to cover) / Basque: estali (to cover)

Hebrew: Hamar ( to heap together) / Basque: Hamarratu (to tie)

Hebrew: Hamar (collection) / Basque: Hamar (Ten)

Hebrew: Hez (Tree) / Basque: Hosto (Leaf)

Hebrew: Hazeh (Backbone) / Basque: Atze (Back)

Hebrew: Hazam (to be strong) / Basque: Hezur (Bone)

Hebrew: Harab (Sweat) / Basque: Alaba (Sister)

Hebrew: Horep (the neck) / Basque: Lepo (the neck)

Hebrew: Harak (to arrange) / Basque: erkatu (to compare)

Hebrew: Haraz (to frigthen) / Basque. irrintzi ( to shout)

Hebrew: Hasat (to think) / Basque: uste (to think)

Hebrew: Hatar (to pray) / Basque: Otoitz (Pray)

Hebrew: Zohn (Sheep) / Basque: Ahuntz (Sheep)

Hebrew: Zeby (Splendor) / Basque: Zeru (Sky)

Hebrew: Azebah (Wet) / Basque: Busti (to wet)

Hebrew: Ziheh (to dry) / Basque: Txukun (to dry)

Hebrew: Zanam (to dry) / Basque: Zimel (Dry)

Hebrew: Zahar (Small) / Basque: Xehe (Thin)

Hebrew: Zor (Knife) / Basque: Zorrotza (Sharpened)

Hebrew: Qwm (to ride) / Basque: Gora (to rise)

Hebrew: Qaton (Little) / Basque: Gutxi (Little)

Hebrew: Qalah (to parch) / Basque: Kiskali (to parch)

Hebrew: Qen (Chambers) / Basque: Gela (Room)

Hebrew: Qanah (to burn) / Basque: Kar (Flame)

Hebrew: Qazah (All) / Basque: Guzti (All)

Hebrew: Qaroub (Near) / Basque: Hurbil (Near)

Hebrew: Qerah (Ice) / Basque: Txindor (ice)

Hebrew: Ravah (to drink) / Basque: Ura (Water)

Hebrew: Sakal (Intelligent) / Basque: Ikasi (to learn)

Hebrew: Sapah (Lip) / Basque: Ezpaina (Lip)

Hebrew: Soulal (Naked) / Basque: Soil (Naked)

Hebrew: Saken (Neighbor) / Basque: Auzoko (Neihbour)

Hebrew: Saqar (Lie) / Basque: Gezur (Lie) - Zakar (Bad)

Hebrew: Sores (Root) / Basque: Sustrai (Root)

Proto-semitic: Bak (Divide) / Basque: Ebaki (to cut)

My next question is who is he and why was he banned? 

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2 hours ago, Piney said:

My next question is who is he and why was he banned? 

It's in the replies.

Btw., I copied the answer to those cognates:

 

You say you think these are cognates. Do you know how cognacy is established? Because this post strongly suggests otherwise.

It's not similarity that matters, it's systematic correspondence.

Thus, for instance, you can't pair /r/ with /l/ or /r/ as your fancy strikes you. You need to identify a systematic sound correspondence, viz. a phonetic environment in which Hebrew /r/ corresponds to Basque /r/ and an environment where it corresponds with /l/.

Until you do this you're not applying even the very basics of the method, and thus cannot hope to contribute in any way whatsoever to our knowledge of a putative pre-IE substrate.

Secondly, Hebrew is itself known to be related to other Semitic and Afro-Asiatic languages. Basque is not a member of this family. Therefore you should be comparing Basque to reconstructed Proto-Afro-Asiatic, not to daughter languages. By this point the time depth is so great any lexical similarities would be suspect anyway.

Thirdly, you do quite a few other fishy things. You can't just assume unmotivated changes in the order of sounds or ignore sounds that don't fit. You need to plausibly explain how and why these things happened. In general, sporadic change is vanishingly rare, particularly when it occurred a long time prior to observation.

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Ok, back to Doggerland of 6,000+ years ago...

Let's settle at: we have no clue what language these Doggerlanders may have spoken.

It may have been related to Vasconian, but in that case the great-great-great-etc. ancestor of it. The relatedness may have come from Doggerlanders coming from one of the ice age refugia: the area of southern France and Iberia.

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19 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Ok, back to Doggerland of 6,000+ years ago...

Let's settle at: we have no clue what language these Doggerlanders may have spoken.

It may have been related to Vasconian, but in that case the great-great-great-etc. ancestor of it. The relatedness may have come from Doggerlanders coming from one of the ice age refugia: the area of southern France and Iberia.

I’m happy to settle for that.

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1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:

I’m happy to settle for that.

I'll add a bit more:

 

The Vasconic substrate hypothesis is a proposal that several Western European languages contain remnants of an old language family of Vasconic languages, of which Basque is the only surviving member. The proposal was made by the German linguist Theo Vennemann, but has been rejected by other linguists.

According to Vennemann, Vasconic languages were once widespread on the European continent before they were mostly replaced by Indo-European languages. Relics of these languages include toponyms across Central and Western Europe.

Theo Vennemann based his hypothesis on the works of Hans Krahe, who postulated an Old European substrate as the origin of the European hydronymy (Old European hydronymy). He classified the substratum language as Indo-European.

Vennemann rejected the classification. He gives the following reasons:

The area of the hydronymy substrate language covers the Iberic Peninsula, which he postules to be Non-Indo-European during the time the hydronymy developed according to Krahe.

From a phoneme-statistical point of view, the dominance of a-vocalism and the sparseness of plosives is noteworthy.

Some hydronyms survived for a long time. This led Vennemann to the toponomastic main axiom that: Once places are given a name, they keep it and languages that newly arrive at such a place take over the already existing toponymy. He concludes that most place names in Europe must be Pre-Indo-European.

Vennemann developed his ideas in a series of papers which were collected in a book called Europa Vasconica - Europa Semitica.

He accepts Krahe's theory that there was a uniform Old European language, which is the origin of the Old European Hydronymy, but proposes that it is of Vasconic origin. Vasconic is a language family proposed by Vennemann encompassing Basque as its only extant member, Aquitan, Ligurian and possibly the Iberian language and the Paleo-Sardinian language.

Theo Vennemann proposes that this uniform Vasconic substrate must come from a linguistically uniform population, which can only exist within a small area. He therefore proposes that during the last Ice Age, the Vasconic people lived in the modern region of Aquitania. As the glaciers retreated, the Vasconics began moving to the north and south, settling most of Western and Central Europe, spreading their language. They gave names to the rivers and places. This toponymy mostly persisted after the Vasconic language was replaced by Indo-European languages in most of their area, the present Basque area in northern Spain and southern France is postulated to be a relic.

 

And read the rest here:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasconic_substrate_hypothesis

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I'm bothered by a fart, a brainfart.

@The Puzzlersuggested that the Basque language has links with the Hebrew language.

Initially I thought that was nonsense, but... I found something...

 

Genetic changes in Bronze Age southern Iberia


https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/934872

While the bulk of the genome shows that Bronze Age individuals are a mix of local Iberian Chalcolithic ancestry and a smaller part of incoming ancestry from the European mainland, the paternally inherited Y chromosome lineages show a complete turnover, linked to the movement of steppe-related ancestry that is also visible in other parts of Europe.

The rich new data from the El Argar sites also show that these two components do not fully account for the genetic make-up of the early Bronze Age societies.

“We also found signals of ancestry that we traced to the central and eastern Mediterranean and western Asia. We cannot say exactly whether these influences arrived at the same time as the steppe-related ancestry, but it shows that it formed an integrative part of the rising El Argar societies, attesting to continued contacts to these regions,” adds Vanessa Villalba-Mouco, postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute and Instituto de Biología Evolutiva.

What I am suggesting is, that the Basque language could have been 'influenced' by people coming from the Middle-East, and that's assuming the people at El Argar spoke a Vasconian language.

But - <drum roll> -  this has NO relationship with the question concerning the language spoken by the Doggerlanders.

This arrival of people from the Middle East happened thousands of years after Doggerland sunk beneath the waves. It may have influenced the Vasconian language (loan words), but not the language of the Doggerlanders.

Edited by Abramelin
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12 hours ago, Abramelin said:

I'm bothered by a fart, a brainfart.

@The Puzzlersuggested that the Basque language has links with the Hebrew language.

Initially I thought that was nonsense, but... I found something...

 

Genetic changes in Bronze Age southern Iberia


https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/934872

While the bulk of the genome shows that Bronze Age individuals are a mix of local Iberian Chalcolithic ancestry and a smaller part of incoming ancestry from the European mainland, the paternally inherited Y chromosome lineages show a complete turnover, linked to the movement of steppe-related ancestry that is also visible in other parts of Europe.

The rich new data from the El Argar sites also show that these two components do not fully account for the genetic make-up of the early Bronze Age societies.

“We also found signals of ancestry that we traced to the central and eastern Mediterranean and western Asia. We cannot say exactly whether these influences arrived at the same time as the steppe-related ancestry, but it shows that it formed an integrative part of the rising El Argar societies, attesting to continued contacts to these regions,” adds Vanessa Villalba-Mouco, postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute and Instituto de Biología Evolutiva.

What I am suggesting is, that the Basque language could have been 'influenced' by people coming from the Middle-East, and that's assuming the people at El Argar spoke a Vasconian language.

But - <drum roll> -  this has NO relationship with the question concerning the language spoken by the Doggerlanders.

This arrival of people from the Middle East happened thousands of years after Doggerland sunk beneath the waves. It may have influenced the Vasconian language (loan words), but not the language of the Doggerlanders.

The more ancient evidence of Haplogroup K has been found in the remains of three individuals from Upper Palaeolithic Magdalenian of Spain 11,950 years ago and in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Tell Ramad, Syria, dating from c. 6000 BC.
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1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:
The more ancient evidence of Haplogroup K has been found in the remains of three individuals from Upper Palaeolithic Magdalenian of Spain 11,950 years ago and in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B site of Tell Ramad, Syria, dating from c. 6000 BC.

Well, that's very interesting. But there very probably wasn't a 'Hebrew' language 6,000 bce or earlier.

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1 hour ago, Abramelin said:

Well, that's very interesting. But there very probably wasn't a 'Hebrew' language 6,000 bce or earlier.

Probably, it most likely developed, if it does come from Euskara base, with ancient same root concept words becoming changed as a group settled in the Levant…

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1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:

Probably, it most likely developed, if it does come from Euskara base, with ancient same root concept words becoming changed as a group settled in the Levant…

You're suggesting Hebrew developed from Euskara??

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58 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

You're suggesting Hebrew developed from Euskara??

Probably not.

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4 hours ago, The Puzzler said:

Probably not.

Personally I think that the language spoken by the Doggerlanders, as part of the Maglemosian culture, was related to the language spoken among the people living near the ice lakes bordering the northern ice sheet that ran from the UK to Siberia

I think these peoples were in close contact with eachother.

The Vasconians maybe showed up during a later stage of Doggerland, and by their presence may have created a 'creole' language.

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  • 3 weeks later...

When Finland became an inland sea some 8500BC (inaccurate) the glacial rebound was raising the European continental plate by potentially a few meters per hundred years. 
 

I’ve been thinking a lot about deglaciation and aside from uniform melting Ive had to consider that ice sheets would fracture and that shards of glacier would carve the landscape. 
 

It’s likely to me as an amateur that Ice gouging could have helped the Storegga slide come to be.

 

————

all earth impactors create a ram projection as they compress the atmospheric gas between surfaces. This projection superheats the air and is very much capable of flash melting glacial ice.

 

Id suspect that the deposition of material in the Doggerland area might conceal such glacial furrowings.

Edited by Frank_Hoenedge
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13 hours ago, Poncho_Peanatus said:

the deglaciation of Europe and surroundings year by year. Hopefully this can be usefull

 

 

I made a couple of screenshots of your video:

Screenshot_20231216-160616_Firefox.thumb.jpg.018fbcab78245138fedcd8317b36dee3.jpg

According to your video, the Dogger Island/archipelago still existed around 5000 BP.

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