Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Doggerland


Sceptical believer

Recommended Posts

On 2/14/2024 at 4:01 AM, Abramelin said:

How about that….? 21 meters….we have no freaking idea what was going on tbh, even though we think we do.

The Blinkerwall hey.

The huge structure could potentially be the oldest Stone Age megastructure built by humans in Europe.

Situated 21 meters beneath the surface of the Baltic, this previously undiscovered megastructure measures around 1km in length and is constructed from 1,673 individual stones.

Known as the Blinkerwall, it was thought to have been built 10,000 years ago at a time before its location in the Bay of Mecklenburg had been swallowed up by rising sea levels.

The region - known as Doggerland - was flooded around 8,2000 years ago.

According to archaeologists, the wall was likely built by hunter-gatherers as a way to redirect reindeer herds into a dead end so that they could easily be picked off.”

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/15/2024 at 7:20 AM, The Puzzler said:

How about that….? 21 meters….we have no freaking idea what was going on tbh, even though we think we do.

The Blinkerwall hey.

The huge structure could potentially be the oldest Stone Age megastructure built by humans in Europe.

Situated 21 meters beneath the surface of the Baltic, this previously undiscovered megastructure measures around 1km in length and is constructed from 1,673 individual stones.

Known as the Blinkerwall, it was thought to have been built 10,000 years ago at a time before its location in the Bay of Mecklenburg had been swallowed up by rising sea levels.

The region - known as Doggerland - was flooded around 8,2000 years ago.

According to archaeologists, the wall was likely built by hunter-gatherers as a way to redirect reindeer herds into a dead end so that they could easily be picked off.”

I hope you did notice the error: it should be 8,200 years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

I hope you did notice the error: it should be 8,200 years ago.

Yes.

It’s an interesting structure.

It does show that people of the day had the ability and knowledge to build rock structures to trap animals….what insight does this give one into what Doggerland meant to us…?

 https://www.archaeology.org/news/12157-240214-baltic-sea-blinkerwall

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Yes.

It’s an interesting structure.

It does show that people of the day had the ability and knowledge to build rock structures to trap animals….what insight does this give one into what Doggerland meant to us…?

 https://www.archaeology.org/news/12157-240214-baltic-sea-blinkerwall

 

As you see in the image I posted in the thread I linked to, Doggerland was their neighbour.

The Dogger Bank is a moraine, and could have had large boulders on its surface when it was still above sea level.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

As you see in the image I posted in the thread I linked to, Doggerland was their neighbour.

The Dogger Bank is a moraine, and could have had large boulders on its surface when it was still above sea level.

So, let’s check out Meckleburg…

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mecklenburg

Mecklenburg is the site of many prehistoric dolmen tombs. Its earliest organised inhabitants may have had Celtic origins. By no later than 100 BC the area had been populated by pre-Christian Germanic peoples.”…

And what’s with all the freaking dolmens everywhere…what are they?

Celtic origins in Northern Germany…..that’s interesting, to me. 
Should we expect the people who built the Blinkerwall to be an early Celtic type…?
Meckleburg is right where Tollense is.

Edited by The Puzzler
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, The Puzzler said:

So, let’s check out Meckleburg…

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mecklenburg

Mecklenburg is the site of many prehistoric dolmen tombs. Its earliest organised inhabitants may have had Celtic origins. By no later than 100 BC the area had been populated by pre-Christian Germanic peoples.”…

And what’s with all the freaking dolmens everywhere…what are they?

Celtic origins in Northern Germany…..that’s interesting, to me. 
Should we expect the people who built the Blinkerwall to be an early Celtic type…?
Meckleburg is right where Tollense is.

You're talking of a period many thousands of years later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Abramelin said:

You're talking of a period many thousands of years later.

Yes, starting at the beginning…lol…let’s see who these inhabitants were by back-tracking them to try and understamd their thoughts some more….is where I’m at.

Edited by The Puzzler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Yes, starting at the beginning…lol…let’s see who these inhabitants were by back-tracking them to try and understamd their thoughts some more….is where I’m at.

Well, there were no Celts or Germanics back then. Just forget about them in this context.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Well, there were no Celts or Germanics back then. Just forget about them in this context.

Seemingly…no Germanics anyway…only after 100BC did they arrive…according to the link I showed…

Barry Cunliffe believes Celts were on the Western seaboard since around 6000BC and I believe him. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The use of rocks to build…corals, dolmens, stones of Carnac….I think it’s in Germania text where it’s spoken of large rocks being hurled by the wind….I don’t know exactly what all the rocks mean…but they mean something….

The example you gave is, again, interesting, but does it have any meaning so early??
I’d expect Hunter gatherers to use these sorts of animal herding to kill techniques at that time, I think mammoths and many animals met the same fates…we learnt how to “herd” animals to their death…

What makes this one so special? I’m not being argumentative but this needs to have a point…

It’s pre-Neolithic? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Seemingly…no Germanics anyway…only after 100BC did they arrive…according to the link I showed…

Barry Cunliffe believes Celts were on the Western seaboard since around 6000BC and I believe him. 

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/374486-scandinavias-first-farmers-slaughtered-the-hunter-gatherer-population-dna-analysis-suggests/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, The Puzzler said:

The use of rocks to build…corals, dolmens, stones of Carnac….I think it’s in Germania text where it’s spoken of large rocks being hurled by the wind….I don’t know exactly what all the rocks mean…but they mean something….

The example you gave is, again, interesting, but does it have any meaning so early??
I’d expect Hunter gatherers to use these sorts of animal herding to kill techniques at that time, I think mammoths and many animals met the same fates…we learnt how to “herd” animals to their death…

What makes this one so special? I’m not being argumentative but this needs to have a point…

It’s pre-Neolithic? 

It's of course pre-Neolitic: it's Mesolithic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Abramelin said:

I don’t even need to read the article but I will…of course they did, because they were indeed, Neolithic Celtic…over-taking a Scandinavian HG type, who by over chance, actually gave us the shamanic mythologies…Celts were a navigational, trade type…who succeeded that way…no hunter gatherer skills necessary…just take the stories, take everything and make it your own. 

Germanics themselves came much later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

It's of course pre-Neolitic: it's Mesolithic.

 So…….who built it?
Known as the Blinkerwall, it was thought to have been built 10,000 years ago at a time before its location in the Bay of Mecklenburg had been swallowed up by rising sea levels.
 

 

Edited by The Puzzler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don’t think it’s interesting Tollense is in the immediate area?

Thousands of years might seperate the history…but are they the same people who always lived there…?
They certainly weren’t Germanics in the battle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:

 So…….who built it?
Known as the Blinkerwall, it was thought to have been built 10,000 years ago at a time before its location in the Bay of Mecklenburg had been swallowed up by rising sea levels.
 

 

Probably very similar people as those who inhabited Doggerland at that same time: dark skinned people with blue eyes. And all members of the Maglemosian culture.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Probably very similar people as those who inhabited Doggerland at that same time: dark skinned people with blue eyes. And all members of the Maglemosian culture.

OK well that’s great…we need to find Neolithic dolmens in the greater Doggerland area…we need to know who the people were at 5500BC…the people who were inundated…the people who began building on the Orkneys, only then can we discover what they contributed to later cultures..of the continent and Great Britain and who they, themselves were.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:

OK well that’s great…we need to find Neolithic dolmens in the greater Doggerland area…we need to know who the people were at 5500BC…the people who were inundated…the people who began building on the Orkneys, only then can we discover what they contributed to later cultures..of the continent and Great Britain and who they, themselves were.

The Stonehenge site was already occupied thousands of years before the famous stone circle was erected. I have posted about this in this thread long ago. I thought it were refugees from Doggerland who created a death cult. Now check Blick Mead.

I also suggested that some of these Doggerlanders went south, to France (Brittany), and changed their wooden built 'temples' for stone temples. None of their wooden temples survived the flooding of Doggerland, and thus they started building temples and such using stone instead.

Years later - also posted in this thread - it was found out the oldest European megalithic structures were erected in Brittany.

You better read the whole damn thread.

Edited by Abramelin
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Puzzler said:

OK well that’s great…we need to find Neolithic dolmens in the greater Doggerland area…we need to know who the people were at 5500BC…the people who were inundated…the people who began building on the Orkneys, only then can we discover what they contributed to later cultures..of the continent and Great Britain and who they, themselves were.

They would have been the same as the folk living at Star Carr 10,000 years ago

https://www.yas.org.uk/Sections/Prehistory-Research/Mesolithic/Mesolithic-Yorkshire-Star-Carr-a-major-European-Mesolithic-site

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Essan said:

Yes. But that's about 10,000 years ago. So nothing neolithic.

Btw., Star Carr has been discussed in this thread.

Edited by Abramelin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

Yes. But that's about 10,000 years ago. So nothing neolithic.

Btw., Star Carr has been discussed in this thread.

I know we've already mentioned Star Carr.  

The people who lived there were the same people who lived in a similar landscape further south and east, as it was gradually inundated (and continued to be inundated to this day).     Doggerland wasn't a separate place inhabited by different people.  It was just part of what became England.  

When Doggerland was finally inundated, the people living there were exactly the same as the people living in the areas that were not inundated - ie eastern England.

Edited by Essan
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Essan said:

I know we've already mentioned Star Carr.  

The people who lived there were the same people who lived in a similar landscape further south and east, as it was gradually inundated (and continued to be inundated to this day).     Doggerland wasn't a separate place inhabited by different people.  It was just part of what became England.  

When Doggerland was finally inundated, the people living there were exactly the same as the people living in the areas that were not inundated - ie eastern England.

Yep, Doggerland was only the submerged part of a larger area. Denmark, England, Scotland and the Low Lands were part of this larger area. The Channel area too must have belonged to the same area, and large parts of the Baltic.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Abramelin said:

Years later - also posted in this thread - it was found out the oldest European megalithic structures were erected in Brittany.

https://www.science.org/content/article/stonehenge-other-ancient-rock-structures-may-trace-their-origins-monuments

The article may point to a moment in history that is a 1000 years off from the demise of Doggerland, but that can be explained.

 

Edited by Abramelin
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, The Puzzler said:

You don’t think it’s interesting Tollense is in the immediate area?

Thousands of years might seperate the history…but are they the same people who always lived there…?
They certainly weren’t Germanics in the battle.

No. Tollense has nothing to with anything Doggerland.

The battle at Tollense happened like 5,000 years later than anything concerning Doggerland.

Jesus.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.