Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -

Doggerland


Sceptical believer

Recommended Posts

Porpoises made me find the 'squarish formation' I have been boring many to death with.

Some animal researcher used some kind of bathymetrie to investigate some area where porpoises were present, and the results showed there was indeed such a formation.

 

And now this:

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/374854-mysterious-seafloor-pits-associated-with-methane-might-instead-be-the-work-of-porpoises/

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

What lies beneath . . . Late Glacial human occupation of the submerged North Sea landscape

(...)

At the end of the last Ice Age, Northern Europe was repopulated by hunter-gatherer populations from refugia in the south. The continental shelf that is now beneath the North Sea formed a large and resource-rich land mass that was exploited by colonising forager groups with a predominantly terrestrial diet, who were connected to other populations from Wales to Poland by a shared symbolic vocabulary. The two finds presented here are significant because they date to an important transitional period when substantial climatic and environmental changes co-occurred along with a major technological and sociocultural transformation affecting hunter-gatherer societies. The terrestrial diet of the Late Palaeolithic foragers, inferred from the isotopic values of the human parietal bone, forms the baseline for a gradual increase in aquatic foods seen subsequently during the Mesolithic in the region (van der Plicht et al. Reference van der Plicht, Amkreutz, Niekus, Peeters and Smit2016). The geometric design of the decorated bovid bone is further evidence of a shift in symbolic expression from naturalistic figuration to geometric abstraction (Naudinot et al. Reference Naudinot, Bourdier, Laforge, Paris, Bellot-Gurlet, Beyries, Théry-Parisot and Le Goffic2017). As organic remains documenting this transformation are rarely preserved, the North Sea proves to be an important source for organic material culture, such as art objects and human and faunal remains. The two finds help to fill an important gap in our knowledge of the submerged biocultural heritage of the North Sea.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/what-lies-beneath-late-glacial-human-occupation-of-the-submerged-north-sea-landscape/D97FDC8DDCE649ABAD716FC78F21A1BC

 

Me: the part of the quote in Italic and underlined by me is about realistic cave art giving way to abstract symbolic art.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/3/2024 at 10:23 PM, Abramelin said:

Me: the part of the quote in Italic and underlined by me is about realistic cave art giving way to abstract symbolic art.

About those caves:

(...) One area of the North Sea bed is especially intriguing to Leary. Known now as the Cross Sands Anomaly, it’s a huge chalk slab, the size of a sports stadium. ‘It’s impossible to imagine it not being a feature of significance to people living around it,’ he says ‘This is Northsealand’s Uluru; its Rock of Gibraltar.’ Leary speculates that caves in the rock might have been sites of great significance and admits that possibility of exploring such sites is an almost irresistibly alluring one – but technologically still a fair way off.

http://amyjanebeerwildstory.blogspot.com/2016/06/brexit-6000-bc-lost-land-between.html?m=1

 

 

  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Nice posts Abe, will take me some amount of Googling before I can answer any of the thoughts put forward….which is always good, if I have an answer in 10 seconds, even a sarcastic one is never good…to make one ponder for days is good. (Thumbs up emoji)

This is the B side of her Let’s Get Physical single x

 

Edited by The Puzzler
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/20/2024 at 6:54 PM, Abramelin said:

From a YEAR ago:

https://www.bradford.ac.uk/news/archive/2023/magnetic-fields-to-be-used-to-explore-submerged-civilisations.php

Am I too impatient for results, or did they find something truelly intriguing that they hesitate to publish about?

This is the most recent link to anything of that magnetic fields search I could find:

https://interestingengineering.com/innovation/doggerland-magnetic-fields-submerged-civilizations

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Abramelin said:

This is the most recent link to anything of that magnetic fields search I could find:

https://interestingengineering.com/innovation/doggerland-magnetic-fields-submerged-civilizations

Less than a year ago. Could the delay in announcing results simply be because of the volume of data they’ve collected?

I was going to mention Franck Goddio used this technology at Thonis-Heracleion but it’s mentioned in the article. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Doggerland | Full History Documentary

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 

My real question would be, who received the mythology of it, what can connect this to the mythology that may have been recorded as the Biblical Flood…? Or any mythology? 

Edited by The Puzzler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

It’s a great video but contains a phrase that always has me worried, the main archaeologist Clark “wanted to make a name for himself”

My real question would be, who received the mythology of it, what can connect this to the mythology that may have been recorded as the Biblical Flood…? Or any mythology? 

The documentary is about who discovered what, when and where. And you'll have to understand that some discoveries were done when the Bible and the Flood were still considered as historically correct.

The video does contain 1 mistake, one you will read everywhere when Doggerland is the topic: the name "Doggerland" is said to be coined by Bryonie Coles (she even says so herself in the video). But in fact the name was already coined by Herman Wirth in 1932.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

 

 

16 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

The documentary is about who discovered what, when and where. And you'll have to understand that some discoveries were done when the Bible and the Flood were still considered as historically correct.

The video does contain 1 mistake, one you will read everywhere when Doggerland is the topic: the name "Doggerland" is said to be coined by Bryonie Coles (she even says so herself in the video). But in fact the name was already coined by Herman Wirth in 1932.

Im not concerned who found what where.l.Id like to know how do we find this becoming a possible Biblical Flood…?

What people kept this memory? (If as stated at beginning of video the idea of this being the Great Flood)

And. I’m not against it, in fact, I’m all for it….but what people bought this flood myth ( if it is the Doggerland flooding) to the Sumerian King Lists for example…?

Edited by The Puzzler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

 

Im not concerned who found what where.l.Id like to know how do we find this becoming a possible Biblical Flood…?

What people kept this memory? (If as stated at beginning of video the idea of this being the Great Flood)

And. I’m not against it, in fact, I’m all for it….but what people bought this flood myth ( if it is the Doggerland flooding) to the Sumerian King Lists for example…?

The video is great, but it was produced by "Ancient Apocalypse" so a bit sensationalistic..

I have shown that the Doggerlanders could have been in contact with the Black Sea area by travelling along the Rhine and Elbe to the Danube. So, who knows...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 
38 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

The video is great, but it was produced by "Ancient Apocalypse" so a bit sensationalistic..

I have shown that the Doggerlanders could have been in contact with the Black Sea area by travelling along the Rhine and Elbe to the Danube. So, who knows...

I had a bit of an irk when they said the instigator “archaeologist” wanted to “make a name for himself”…so yes, Doggerland is interesting but I want more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

53 minutes ago, The Puzzler said:

Doggerland is interesting but I want more.

I have tried for 99 pages.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Abramelin said:

I have tried for 99 pages.

You’ve done a fantastic  job, Abe.

Sometimes there just isn’t any more information to be currently had. It’s taken modern archaeology/geology/anthropology  two hundred years for us to have accrued the knowledge that we do have about ancient history.  Marine archaeology, even that being done in shallow coastal waters, is difficult, time consuming and expensive to boot. Doggerland is a problem many magnitudes greater than other submerged locations.

The unanswered questions and unexplained mysteries that remain in ancient history personally drive me crazy. It’s difficult to accept that we don’t know and may never know the answers to these questions. I can think of several right off the top of my head that personally bug the crap out of me. But IMO it’s better to make peace with it than to force connections that aren’t warranted, or of falling into the trap of accepting false solutions from unreliable sources simply because on the surface they might seem to provide plausible answers. 

Ancient Apocalypse isn’t only sensationalistic, much of it is outright bs. The only reason Hancock was able to get it onto Netflix was because his son is on the programming department that selects which shows to air. Even then it received a lot of backlash.

That being said,  I enjoyed the Doggerland video too. Keep up the great work 👍

  • Thanks 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, Antigonos said:

You’ve done a fantastic  job, Abe.

Sometimes there just isn’t any more information to be currently had. It’s taken modern archaeology/geology/anthropology  two hundred years for us to have accrued the knowledge that we do have about ancient history.  Marine archaeology, even that being done in shallow coastal waters, is difficult, time consuming and expensive to boot. Doggerland is a problem many magnitudes greater than other submerged locations.

The unanswered questions and unexplained mysteries that remain in ancient history personally drive me crazy. It’s difficult to accept that we don’t know and may never know the answers to these questions. I can think of several right off the top of my head that personally bug the crap out of me. But IMO it’s better to make peace with it than to force connections that aren’t warranted, or of falling into the trap of accepting false solutions from unreliable sources simply because on the surface they might seem to provide plausible answers. 

Ancient Apocalypse isn’t only sensationalistic, much of it is outright bs. The only reason Hancock was able to get it onto Netflix was because his son is on the programming department that selects which shows to air. Even then it received a lot of backlash.

That being said,  I enjoyed the Doggerland video too. Keep up the great work 👍

Nice post. There is no more, but we shall wait.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Antigonos said:

Ancient Apocalypse isn’t only sensationalistic, much of it is outright bs. The only reason Hancock was able to get it onto Netflix was because his son is on the programming department that selects which shows to air. Even then it received a lot of backlash.

That being said,  I enjoyed the Doggerland video too. Keep up the great work 👍

You have no idea how much I hesitated to post this video...

And... I wìll keep up the great work.

Thanks.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/20/2024 at 10:54 AM, Abramelin said:

From a YEAR ago:

https://www.bradford.ac.uk/news/archive/2023/magnetic-fields-to-be-used-to-explore-submerged-civilisations.php

Am I too impatient for results, or did they find something truelly intriguing that they hesitate to publish about?

It's a student. It'll take them some time, certainly. A year is probably pushing it.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/13/2024 at 12:06 PM, Abramelin said:

Doggerland | Full History Documentary

Anyone who watched this video will know what was said about the Doggerlanders becoming sailors when their land slowly but surely submerged.

And this is what I posted long ago:

https://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/179840-doggerland/page/49/#comment-7265458

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.