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Siara

Oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico

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joshsluss

keithisco, on 06 June 2010 - 12:01 PM, said:

Hydro electric dams

wind power

Solar Concentrated Energy

Photovoltaic Farms

Geothermal Energy

Tide turbines

Nuclear Power

sure it does... it's a list of how Electricity can be produced. If we could make our electrical devices/appliances/vehicles vastly more energy efficient, which we can, then the energy production methods listed could easily supply all the energy we need.

I would scratch the nuclear steam kettle/turbine generators however. Too filthy and dangerous.

I believe the main obstacle between us and energy independence is the Oil industry.

Many people are not aware that in 1912 about one third of of the vehicles in boston and new york were electric. The demise of the electric vehicle was brought about mainly by the invention of the electric starter which eliminated the need for the difficult and dangerous engine cranks.... also by the increasing abundance of gasoline from the newly emerging oil industry... and, the fact that electric cars were quite a bit more expensive. As the Oil tycoons gained power they eliminated competitive electric mass transit systems in major cities (trolly cars) .. and replaced them with buses.

The tidal generators seem like a good and highly efficient idea... they seem to be quite safe to sea life.. would be placed in areas close to high population densities (coasts) ... and produce energy very nearly continuously as the tides go IN and OUT . An equal area of moving water produces 300 time more energy than moving air.

..anyway, in my opinion, offshore drilling should not be allowed... you can thank Bush and Obama each for growing that sector. Like all facets of government.. they are putty in the hands of the elite . Wealth is power .. some things never change!

After the Exxon Valdez spill , there was legislation drafted ..TO LIMIT THE PENALTIES THAT COULD BE IMPOSED ON OIL COMPANIES FOR CLEANUP COSTS AND LIABILITIES!!! i forget the amount.. well under one billion per incident... under one hundred million....

As for the approximately 30% ?? of crude oils that go into the production of other than fuels... all? or nearly all? of those products could be made with bio oils instead. How much plastic do we really need?

ok.. i'm done. .. except to say i'm sad for the gulf ,the life within it, and the people near it.

Riiiiight. You didn't read my last post though, the important part of it all is to make this convert to everyday cars for the masses who can't afford a new car. We'd still be very dependent as far as that went. I mean, electric cars aren't exactly selling like crazy from what I can see driving everyday.

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lightly

joshsluss, oops, your right.. i missed your very good point. I got excited about the crises and took off with my rant. Honestly, it angers me that we painted ourselves , or allowed ourselves to be painted, into this corner where we are so utterly dependent on OIL for so much of our energy, agricultural uses, and products, It's a filthy, unhealthy, and unsustainable life style and we can do so much better.

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Leonardo

Riiiiight. You didn't read my last post though, the important part of it all is to make this convert to everyday cars for the masses who can't afford a new car. We'd still be very dependent as far as that went. I mean, electric cars aren't exactly selling like crazy from what I can see driving everyday.

That is down to the automotive industry (in combination with the energy companies) offering an incentive for the driver to trade in their petrol-engine car for a non-petrol model.

The impetus from this would also come, in part, from Government (in the form of tax-breaks, grants, etc.)

It seems that one or two of the parties involved, however, do not have any motivation to make this change a reality.

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joshsluss

That is down to the automotive industry (in combination with the energy companies) offering an incentive for the driver to trade in their petrol-engine car for a non-petrol model.

The impetus from this would also come, in part, from Government (in the form of tax-breaks, grants, etc.)

It seems that one or two of the parties involved, however, do not have any motivation to make this change a reality.

Which is very very unfortunate.

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aquatus1

It seems that one or two of the parties involved, however, do not have any motivation to make this change a reality.

One or two parties?

We are talking about a complete overhaul of the most widely used and extensive infrastructure in the United States. You think only one or two parties have a heart attack thinking about how such a thing could ever be accomplished? This would be a colossal undertaking, requiring billions of dollars, thousands of man-hours, and a complete turn-around of cultural behaviour. You make it sound like some miserly old men in a board room somewhere are growling out a "no" just to save a few bucks.

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lightly

It might help if the government would stop subsidizing OIL and automotive barons.

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Startraveler

In fairness, one party already introduced (and passed in one chamber, almost year ago) a comprehensive energy bill that, among other things, starts laying down the new infrastructure. That would be Waxman-Markey, the dreaded cap-and-trade bill, which actually contains a great deal more than just cap-and-trade. As far as transportation goes:

Subtitle C: Clean Transportation - (Sec. 121) Amends PURPA to require each electric utility to develop a plan to support the use of plug-in electric drive vehicles, including plug-in hybrids. Authorizes plans to provide for deployment of electrical charging stations or infrastructure to support such vehicles. Directs the state regulatory authority or a utility (in the case of a non-regulated utility) to: (1) require that charging infrastructure deployment is interoperable with products of all manufactures; (2) establish protocols and standards for integrating plug-in electric drive vehicles into an electrical distribution system and include the ability for each plug-in electric drive vehicle to be associated with its owner's electric utility account, regardless of its location, for billing purposes; and (3) review such standards within three years. Establishes compliance provisions.

(Sec. 122) Requires the Secretary to establish: (1) a program to deploy and integrate plug-in electric drive vehicles into the electricity grid in multiple regions; and (2) a clearinghouse of information regarding such deployment and integration. Authorizes the Secretary to provide financial assistance to states, Indian tribes, or local governments for furthering such deployment and integration.

(Sec. 123) Requires the Secretary to establish a program to provide financial assistance to automobile manufacturers to facilitate the manufacture of plug-in electric drive vehicles. Authorizes the Secretary to provide financial assistance for the reconstruction or retooling of facilities for the manufacture of plug-in electric drive vehicles or batteries for such vehicles that are developed and produced in the United States. Requires the Secretary to report annually on this program to Congress.

(Sec. 124) Requires the EPA Administrator, at the direction of the Secretary, to provide emission allowances for each of 2012-2025 to: (1) applicants, joint sponsors, and automobile manufacturers for the development and deployment of plug-in electric drive vehicles and advanced technology vehicles; and (2) automobile manufacturers and component suppliers to pay not more than 30% of the cost of reequipping, expanding, or establishing a manufacturing facility to produce qualifying advanced technology vehicles or components and of engineering integration performed in the United States of qualifying vehicles and qualifying components.

(Sec. 125) Amends the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 to increase the total amounts of loans allowed under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Loan Program from $25 billion to $50 billion.

(Sec. 126) Amends the CAA to revise the definition of "renewable biomass" for purposes of the renewable fuel standard by expanding the amount of biomass from forested land that could be used to produce fuels under such standard and eliminating the requirement that feedstock crops come from previously cultivated land.

(Sec. 127) Authorizes the Secretary of Transportation (DOT Secretary) to promulgate regulations to require each light-duty automobile manufacturer's annual covered inventory to be comprised of a minimum percentage of fuel-choice enabling automobiles (an automobile that has been warranted by its manufacturer to operate on gasoline, E85, and M85) if such a requirement is a cost-effective way to achieve the nation's energy independence and environmental objectives.

(Sec. 128) Amends the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to include: (1) American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands within the definition of "state" for the purposes of the diesel emissions reduction program; and (2) the construction of pipelines for renewable fuels within the loan guarantee program.

(Sec. 130) Requires the DOT Secretary to allocate credits to federal, state, and fuel provider fleets that re-power or convert an existing vehicle so that it is capable of operating on an alternative fuel.

(Sec. 130A) Requires the EPA Administrator, after an examination of scientific studies in 360 days, to report to Congress on: (1) the contribution that light and heavy duty natural gas vehicles have made during the last decade to the reduction of GHGs and criteria pollutants under the CAA and the reduced consumption of petroleum-based fuels; (2) the expected reductions from such vehicles between 2010 and 2020; and (3) additional federal measures that could maximize the potential for natural gas used in both stationary and mobile sources to contribute to the reduction of GHGs and such pollutants.

Edited by Startraveler

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Siara

It might help if the government would stop subsidizing OIL and automotive barons.

In order for that to happen we'd have to kick the corporate lobbyists out of DC. And then there's the whole bribery culture.

Unfortunately, thanks to the Supreme Court's lifting the restrictions on corporate campaign contributions our system is going to be MORE controlled by Big Oil rather than less.

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indsloan

Hydro electric dams

wind power

Solar Concentrated Energy

Photovoltaic Farms

Geothermal Energy

Tide turbines

Nuclear Power

All of the technology is NOW, my country broke a world record in producing 52% of its entire energy consumption from wind power alone, only for 2 days during a particularly windy spell, but nonetheless goes to show what can be achieved TODAY! This did not take into account the other forms of alternative energy also being pumped into the grid.

As long China keeps giving the U.S.A. money to burn there is no need to hurry.

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