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Beckys_Mom

Your Christian Name

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MARAB0D

In France all paperwork are formatted with only Nom (name) and Prenom (first name). There are no room for middle name or initials, which is still widely use. I think it's the same in Germany. As far as I know due to the Communist influence of the past century, it would be the same in Poland (three countries I know well).

Interesting... But it seems at modern population sizes two names is not enough to exactly identify a person, so is this the reason why the French often have double names?

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MARAB0D

LOL, BM - you would be interested about Colin!

The boy's name Colin \c(o)-

lin\ is pronounced KOH-lin, KAH-lin. It is of Irish, Scottish and Gaelic origin, and its meaning is "young creature". Diminutive form of the medieval name Col or Colle, a short form of Nicholas (Greek) "people of victory". In Scotland, it has been used as an Anglicised form of Cailean (Gaelic), popular among the Campbells and the MacKenzies.

I read this short article, and only then realised that in Russian Nicholas also has a diminutive form "Kolya" :)

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Paranoid Android

I just figured everyone in the Christianised world used "Christian name", "First name", "Given name"... etc, as ways of saying the same thing. I don't recall ever seeing "Christian name" on any forms I've filled out, but I can't say as I really looked for it either. It may have religious origins, but as used these days I have seen no religious connotation behind the term.

~ PA

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Beckys_Mom

I just figured everyone in the Christianised world used "Christian name", "First name", "Given name"... etc, as ways of saying the same thing. I don't recall ever seeing "Christian name" on any forms I've filled out, but I can't say as I really looked for it either. It may have religious origins, but as used these days I have seen no religious connotation behind the term.

~ PA

Yup thats how they view it over here... the just ref to your 1st name as - your christian name... instead of calling it a 1st name.... Sometimes it will appear on certain forms... I saw it on a home contents insurance form..... then Karlis came in and presented 3 examples.. one of which was from another insurance form... so I guess some will ref to it as christian name and some say - 1st name...

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Beckys_Mom

Geri, I already explained that the churches simply cannot dictate anything today, as they do not have any political power, any attempt to dictate would only make clowns out of them. The tradition of baptising was saved till our days, but it was greatly amended. Parents today choose the names for the baby well before this baby is born, and of course there is no church which can dictate how to call this baby! But this is only NOW, not 100+ years ago.Then the parents were HAPPY to have the baby named by the church - the times differ and the traditions are amended. We still formally say "mother-in-law" but we may only see her once a year, we do not normally live in one house with her, this family title was preserved since the past centuries and makes no sense in our days. But in the past it was making sense, as she was INSTEAD of a real mother for a young woman (or a lad sometimes) who moved to live with the parents of their new spouse. All what we have today originates somewhere in the past, and this tradition of "Christian names" is not an exception. We still say "landlord" despite now it mostly refers to some grub whom we rent the rooms from, while 200 years ago this was meaning a mighty Feudal, whose land you are forced plough with the permission to take some crops from it for your own family! The times change.

Your previous point was simply - IE - I was named after some saint.. when in reality that is not true... I point out that parents will name their kids on what they see fit...it doesnt have to be because a saint might have a name like it lol

Take St Paddy....long before he was called a saint... dont ya think so many males had the name Patrick?

St Andrew.... many males had that name before the church thought of calling some man with the name a saint...and they name the person a saint due to their work etc... their name is nothing to do with it and its not classed as a christian name in the sense it is holy....

Just because a saint may have a simliar name ... doesnt mean the parents that baptize their kid...were only going to name their kid after some saint...

I had my child baptized - Rebecca Louise.....I chose Rebecca at random.. it just came out the sec I saw her, a lot of mothers claim they knew what to call their kid the sec they saw them for the 1st time....... the louise part is after me as Louise is my middle name

LOL, BM - you would be interested about Colin!

I wasnt asking you what the name Colin means or where it may come from LMAO... I pointed out there is no male saint with the name colin

Many names all come from other names... but it doesnt mean that because they may have come from a longer name...that sounds completely different.. IE Nicolas..and from that later comes Colin...it doesnt make the name Colin = to the name Nicolas... they are two seperate names... just in the same way IE - two siblings come from the same whomb....it doesnt make then the same person...lol

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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MARAB0D

Your previous point was simply - IE - I was named after some saint.. when in reality that is not true... I point out that parents will name their kids on what they see fit...it doesnt have to be because a saint might have a name like it lol

Take St Paddy....long before he was called a saint... dont ya think so many males had the name Patrick?

St Andrew.... many males had that name before the church thought of calling some man with the name a saint...and they name the person a saint due to their work etc... their name is nothing to do with it and its not classed as a christian name in the sense it is holy....

Just because a saint may have a simliar name ... doesnt mean the parents that baptize their kid...were only going to name their kid after some saint...

I had my child baptized - Rebecca Louise.....I chose Rebecca at random.. it just came out the sec I saw her, a lot of mothers claim they knew what to call their kid the sec they saw them for the 1st time....... the louise part is after me as Louise is my middle name

I wasnt asking you what the name Colin means or where it may come from LMAO... I pointed out there is no male saint with the name colin

Many names all come from other names... but it doesnt mean that because they may have come from a longer name...that sounds completely different.. IE Nicolas..and from that later comes Colin...it doesnt make the name Colin = to the name Nicolas... they are two seperate names... just in the same way IE - two siblings come from the same whomb....it doesnt make then the same person...lol

Geri, the examples must be first of all sound in their historicity! The name Patrick most likely derives from the Latin word "patrician" and must mean "noble" or "father" or smth like that - so this name could exist in any Romanised culture irrelevantly to was there st Patrick or not. But it would not be in the church calendar without him, so whoever now is named Patrick is automatically named specifically after the saint with this name, not just because it sounds like "patrician".

St Andrew was an apostle of Jesus, and was crucified for his preaching, so he became one of the first canonised saints nearly 2000 years ago, and this made this Greek name popular within the Christian countries. Andres in Greek means "man".

This is my opinion, you have a different one - and I do not see the need to persuade you anyhow. Neither I can easily accept your argumentation as I do not see it substantiated enough - and playing on the words, like insisting that Colin is not the same name as Nicholas, but in some local ethnic pronounciation. As a diminutive form it simply must have its origin and cannot be seen as an independent name at all, of which fact you were informed by the brief article I posted for you - to post it is as far as I can go, if your mood is to dismiss any opinion mismatching your own, then what would you take back from the discussion except your own initial opinion? Then why do you want to discuss the topic instead of just making an appropriate statement in your blog?

Edited by MARAB0D

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Beckys_Mom

Geri, the examples must be first of all sound in their historicity! The name Patrick most likely derives from the Latin word "patrician" and must mean "

I wasnt trying to debate the name an orign of - Patrick...it was just an example of how that name is known as a saints name too.. I was refering to your previous point.. when you suddenly thought my parents named me after a saint... as I disagree with you ..I used the name Patrick as one example...as your logic states how I was named after a saint.. I pointed out that is not true.. just because saints have similar names is not the reasons why parents pick the name... everyone has their own reasons why they name their kids.... not to go on about the orign of the name itself...this was never the point oh this thread....

This is my opinion, you have a different one - and I do not see the need to persuade you anyhow. Neither I can easily accept your argumentation as I do not see it substantiated enough

It seems to me that you dug too much into this thread idea.... at 1st you saw it as - people who may or may not feel insulted with the term - christian name............ I winded up telling you that it was not the idea of the thread and I explained to you what the thread is really about... so you return with ok sorry and so on............ and now for some reason you have taken the thread to another level...going on about how I am named after a saint.. when I do not believe I was...Seriously this is not the topic at hand ... I dont get why you dug into it... thats all

This thread was straight forward.. and everyone else got it... it isnt about the orign of the names we have... its only asking each of you if you refer to your 1sst name as christian name or you just call it 1st name... thats it...

Then why do you want to discuss the topic instead of just making an appropriate statement in your blog?

No one else here has a problemn with my topic... only you so far.. all because you have tried to derail it on to another meaning... when my OP is not the slightest concerned with that....... People have even posted including a mod.. that it was a cool thread idea... it is just yourself that seems to want to take the thread idea off to another level MARA... no one else has

But hey thanks for your.....concern!

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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MARAB0D

I wasnt trying to debate the name an orign of - Patrick...it was just an example of how that name is known as a saints name too.. I was refering to your previous point.. when you suddenly thought my parents named me after a saint... as I disagree with you ..I used the name Patrick as one example...as your logic states how I was named after a saint.. I pointed out that is not true.. just because saints have similar names is not the reasons why parents pick the name... everyone has their own reasons why they name their kids.... not to go on about the orign of the name itself...this was never the point oh this thread....

It seems to me that you dug too much into this thread idea.... at 1st you saw it as - people who may or may not feel insulted with the term - christian name............ I winded up telling you that it was not the idea of the thread and I explained to you what the thread is really about... so you return with ok sorry and so on............ and now for some reason you have taken the thread to another level...going on about how I am named after a saint.. when I do not believe I was...Seriously this is not the topic at hand ... I dont get why you dug into it... thats all

This thread was straight forward.. and everyone else got it... it isnt about the orign of the names we have... its only asking each of you if you refer to your 1sst name as christian name or you just call it 1st name... thats it...

No one else here has a problemn with my topic... only you so far.. all because you have tried to derail it on to another meaning... when my OP is not the slightest concerned with that....... People have even posted including a mod.. that it was a cool thread idea... it is just yourself that seems to want to take the thread idea off to another level MARA... no one else has

But hey thanks for your.....concern!

No, and again no - I never said your parents deliberately named you after the saint! No one probably does, or this is rare at least. I said you were named after an Anglican saint - I would've never said this if your parents named you, say, Benasire or Indira or Zulphia... Because the church does not have saints like that. Same refers to Patrick - one can be named Patrick by the parents after the neighbour's cat, so what? It would be still after st Patrick! And even if someone is named Pat (I know such cases) it would be still after st Patrick and a name "Christian" in the sense it is accepted by the church. The sound of the actual name is completely irrelevant - say for Orthodox church any person called John would be still the same "Ivan" or "Ian" or "Ioann" or "Johann", because John and Ivan are one the same name in different languages, and this name is Jewish by origins but still "Christian" - through John the Baptist and st John. It is the same as mentioned above Gerald=Yaroslav or Michael=Moses=Moe or Mary=Mariam or Jesus=Joshua=Ieshu etc etc etc. Including Colin=Nicholas same as Eddie=Edward=Eduard

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MissMelsWell

My name is Greek, but as was stated before, my name means "Victorious People" (derived from the Goddess Nike) and later became the French and presumably "christian" feminine for Nicholas.

I was a big hit in Greece when people asked me my name... Nikki (although my "christian name" haha, is Nicole) ... it's an awful popular name there. There's a statue in Athens of Nike, my Greek guide INSISTED that I have my picture taken with it... LOL. It happened again in Turkey at Ephesis, the guide there also insisted I have my photo taken with a pair of Nike wings there. LOL I'll have ot see if I can dig those up. Never thought my about my name one way or another till I realized that some people obviously think it's cool. LOL.

But this thread has me wondering what the heck the origin of the middle name is! I know at one time, in some places in the USA, you were forced to give a child a middle name. My grandmother never did for my oldest uncle, and the state where he was born gave him a middle name... that would be the letter R. LOL My middle name is Marie, but that's only about the oldest name on the face of the planet.

Edited by MissMelsWell

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MARAB0D

My name is Greek, but as was stated before, my name means "Victorious People" (derived from the Goddess Nike) and later became the French and presumably "christian" feminine for Nicholas.

I was a big hit in Greece when people asked me my name... Nikki (although my "christian name" haha, is Nicole) ... it's an awful popular name there. There's a statue in Athens of Nike, my Greek guide INSISTED that I have my picture taken with it... LOL. It happened again in Turkey at Ephesis, the guide there also insisted I have my photo taken with a pair of Nike wings there. LOL I'll have ot see if I can dig those up. Never thought my about my name one way or another till I realized that some people obviously think it's cool. LOL.

But this thread has me wondering what the heck the origin of the middle name is! I know at one time, in some places in the USA, you were forced to give a child a middle name. My grandmother never did for my oldest uncle, and the state where he was born gave him a middle name... that would be the letter R. LOL My middle name is Marie, but that's only about the oldest name on the face of the planet.

The third name seems quite essential since when the society grows and the families form the clans. All members of the clan often have one the same family name (surname), so it is well possible for a dozen John Blow to exist within one clan and be relatives, but not even know each other. The third name eliminates the uncertainty, which exactly of these John Blows is wanted for robbery or committed a heroic deed. Romans were getting away by giving people the nicknames, which played the role of the third name - like in Claudius Tiberius Nero, Claudius would be a clan (family) name, Tiberius would be like our first name and Nero (Brave) would be the nickname, and even then the first CTN had to have the 4th name of Agenobarbus, which was yet another nickname (Red-Bearded), as there were simultaneously several Nero in the same sub-clan. Same way Gaius Julius Caesar by itself only meant one Caesar, while the later caesars had to use nicknames, like Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian or Gaius Julius Caesar Caligula. Slavic people get away by using a Patronymic - say, if the father is Ivan, then the Patronymic of a son would necessarily be Ivanovic(h) ("son of Ivan") and of a daughter "Ivanovna". French culture uses double names like Jean-Paul, while English culture uses the middle name. Even Chinese names also mostly have 3 components (Mao Zedong=Mao Tze Dong), as this serves the more or less exact identification of the people. The names are just codes, and the combinations of these elementary codes make individual names.

Edited by MARAB0D

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Sherapy

The third name seems quite essential since when the society grows and the families form the clans. All members of the clan often have one the same family name (surname), so it is well possible for a dozen John Blow to exist within one clan and be relatives, but not even know each other. The third name eliminates the uncertainty, which exactly of these John Blows is wanted for robbery or committed a heroic deed. Romans were getting away by giving people the nicknames, which played the role of the third name - like in Claudius Tiberius Nero, Claudius would be a clan (family) name, Tiberius would be like our first name and Nero (Brave) would be the nickname, and even then the first CTN had to have the 4th name of Agenobarbus, which was yet another nickname (Red-Bearded), as there were simultaneously several Nero in the same sub-clan. Same way Gaius Julius Caesar by itself only meant one Caesar, while the later caesars had to use nicknames, like Gaius Julius Caesar Octavian or Gaius Julius Caesar Caligula. Slavic people get away by using a Patronymic - say, if the father is Ivan, then the Patronymic of a son would necessarily be Ivanovic(h) ("son of Ivan") and of a daughter "Ivanovna". French culture uses double names like Jean-Paul, while English culture uses the middle name. Even Chinese names also mostly have 3 components (Mao Zedong=Mao Tze Dong), as this serves the more or less exact identification of the people. The names are just codes, and the combinations of these elementary codes make individual names.

All this info your posting on names, had me searching the web off and on all afternoon..

I have come to discover that my name can be masculine. Two books written by the french writer Collette( I love anything french) they are called Cheri and The Last of Cheri. The Cheri(dear) character is a man..

My middle name is Renee( the female version).

Any ways thank you for the amazing info you have posted , I had no idea there is so much on names...:P

Edited by Sherizzle

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MARAB0D

All this info your posting on names, had me searching the web off and on all afternoon..

I have come to discover that my name can be masculine. Two books written by the french writer Collette( I love anything french) they are called Cheri and The Last of Cheri. The Cheri(dear) character is a man..

My middle name is Renee( the female version).

Any ways thank you for the amazing info you have posted , I had no idea there is so much on names...:P

I know French only on the surface (and only because in late 70s I was weirdly investigated by KGB as a suspected French spy :) ) but my understanding is that it is much closer to Russian grammatically than to English. The nouns in French (same as in Spanish or Italian/Latin too) all have 3 genders, this is common for the Celtic languages (Slavic languages are related to Celtic more than to Germanic). So the male "dear" would sound as "Sher" while the female "dear" would sound as "Sheri", and this would be reflected in their spelling (the last vowel in French words is not vocal). This word "mon Cherie" (I guess) does not really mean "my dear", but rather "my little Cherry" or something tender of this kind. So it is really a novelty name as a "name", perhaps only appeared after Napoleonic wars when the occupation of France spread French culture Europe-wide.

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Sherapy

I know French only on the surface (and only because in late 70s I was weirdly investigated by KGB as a suspected French spy :) ) but my understanding is that it is much closer to Russian grammatically than to English. The nouns in French (same as in Spanish or Italian/Latin too) all have 3 genders, this is common for the Celtic languages (Slavic languages are related to Celtic more than to Germanic). So the male "dear" would sound as "Sher" while the female "dear" would sound as "Sheri", and this would be reflected in their spelling (the last vowel in French words is not vocal). This word "mon Cherie" (I guess) does not really mean "my dear", but rather "my little Cherry" or something tender of this kind. So it is really a novelty name as a "name", perhaps only appeared after Napoleonic wars when the occupation of France spread French culture Europe-wide.

Wow, :wub: thank you that is so interesting. do you just know this stuff off the top of your head?

What about Matthew?

Ha ha ha ha on french spy ...What made the KGB go in this direction?

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MissMelsWell

Interesting... I always assumed my daughter's name was also Greek (Alexandra), and it is, but it's specifically Mycenaen, or at least that's the earliest written feminine form (which the male form is obviously the Roman Alexander or Greek Alexandros.)

The name Cassandra is essentially the same name (Greek Cassandra, Roman Alexandra), and she was the Greek prophetess who was given her powers by Apollo, then spurned his love. Very tragic affair. LOL.

Oddly, my daughter's half sister's name is Cassandra. LOL.

Edited by MissMelsWell

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MissMelsWell

What about Matthew?

Pretty sure Matthew is hebrew... very very old name. As old as John, David, Joseph, Mark, and all those Biblical old names.

The spelling is the English spelling of the same name french name Matthieu. The original hebrew name is Mattathias I believe. I have a friend whose last name is Mattathiason. Which in my guestimation, must be a Hebrew Norse mixed spelling or something weird. LOL.

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susieice

My first name is Susan and means a lily. It is Hebrew and is a book in the Apocrypha derived from what was once the first chapter of the book of Daniel. My middle name is Elaine. It means light and is the French and English translation of the Greek Helene. I don't think my mom and dad had any saints in mind but there is a Biblical origin.

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Sherapy

Pretty sure Matthew is hebrew... very very old name. As old as John, David, Joseph, Mark, and all those Biblical old names.

The spelling is the English spelling of the same name french name Matthieu. The original hebrew name is Mattathias I believe. I have a friend whose last name is Mattathiason. Which in my guestimation, must be a Hebrew Norse mixed spelling or something weird. LOL.

I'm was thinking Greek(NT). But you could be correct :w00t:

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susieice

I'm was thinking Greek(NT). But you could be correct :w00t:

Matthew is Hebrew and means Gift From God. It's my oldest son's middle name.

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MARAB0D

Wow, :wub: thank you that is so interesting. do you just know this stuff off the top of your head?

What about Matthew?

Ha ha ha ha on french spy ...What made the KGB go in this direction?

My de-facto had some old affair with a fella from French embassy or consulate - and later he got caught with something, and her telephone was in his book (he was writing something and once asked for my help with chemical translations problems); as soon as my dad was dealing with satellite communication and other serious space/defense stuff, they panicked; what worsened everything was that she was at that moment enrolled to French courses, and was taking me with her from time to time (I was helping her as I did not meet any problem with this language). :)

Its sure from on top of my head, I have a lot of rubbish stored in the attic.

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Beckys_Mom

No, and again no - I never said your parents deliberately named you after the saint! No one probably does, or this is rare at least. I said you were named after an Anglican saint - I would've never said this if your parents named you,

Well butter my butt and call me a biscuit...couldn't you have at least worded it better? LOL..like - Well Gei there was a saint called Geraldine...

But it doesnt mean just because some saint was called Geraldine... that people were named AFTER her lol.... that is silly..... the only time you can say someone was actually named afer a saint or even someone famous... is if their parents did in fact chose to name then after a saint and said so.....

You came in here going all - But Geri you were named after the saint Geraldine <--- Umm WRONG LOL.... there just so happens to be a saint that had the same name.. it doesnt mean a thingw00t.gif ... it would have been better if you had of just mentioned there was a saint with the same name LMAO

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Beckys_Mom

Ha ha ha ha on french spy ...What made the KGB go in this direction?

What made this thread go in this direction? ... lol I mean.. I should just PM a mod and request them to totally change the OP for - the term 1st name / christian name to - Lets wonder what names mean and where they come from...then see if the mod will move the thread to a section more suitable?? ya think?

*shakes head* dear oh dear.... well I shouldn't moan... a lot of people actually did understand the OP.. so thats good enough for me

Carry on derailing....talk about names and goodness know what ever tickles your fancy..im just pulling your leg lol .. w00t.giflaugh.gif

Moving on....... lol... so....hmmmmmmm

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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MissMelsWell

Well Geri (happy Mothers Day! Or at least it is here in the US original.gif ) I think we sorta tapped out the OP, in the UK, it seems to pop up occasionally, as it does in AU, but in the USA, most of us have never seen "christian name" on any kind of form at all.

Name origins are sorta cool though don't ya think?

I kind of wondered... were you the only Geri you knew of grew of growing up? I ask because here in the states, it's a fairly old-fashioned name and not at all common for people born after about 1930 or so. I think the variation of that name "Jerilynn or Jerianne" kind of replaced Geraldine over time.

I need to ask my mother sometime how she came up with my name, Nicole. When I was born, it was extremely uncommon, I never knew any other Nicole's or Nikki's growing up. The name became very popular, like in the top 10 ten for baby girls briefly in the 80s and again in the early 90s, but then dropped down the popularity list again.

Anyone notice that yesterday they came out with the list of 2010 top baby names? Surprise, Isabella is number one for girls, and Jacob for boys. Twilight influence anyone? BARF. I like both names, but ugh. it's really quite fascinating how popular culture can influence names over time. currently, Victorian and biblical names (which are always popular anyway) are all the rage.

This thread got my intersted in researching a couple of names I've always been curious about. For example my best girlfriend's name is Sharon. I figured it was Hebrew and it is... but it's NOT actually a name. Sharon is the Hebrew word for "plain" it was never used as a first name until the 1920s and it gained popularity because there was a heroine character in a pulp science fiction series novel called the Rocketeer(?) and at that point, people started naming their girls after that character. LOL.

Edited by MissMelsWell

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Beckys_Mom

Well Geri (happy Mothers Day! Or at least it is here in the US original.gif ) I think we sorta tapped out the OP, in the UK, it seems to pop up occasionally, as it does in AU, but in the USA, most of us have never seen "christian name" on any kind of form at all.

Why thanks we had our Mothers Day in March but thank you...

Karlis posted a link showing 3 examples of forms to fill in.. one read - Christian name_____... the other form read - 1st name_______ andthe other read - Given name__________

I made this thread for when I was filling out my home contents insurance form.. it asked me to give my Christian name_________ & Surname______

So I thought... I wonder if other parts of the word use that term christian name as a way of asking for your 1st name?... just curious is all lol....and I wanted to see if maybe those that are not religious may still ref to their 1st name as their christian name lol

I was joking with Sheri... I was just laughing it all off on how the thread got mixed up LMAO.. its not something I would run to complain about though.... nahhh I wouldmt get my knickers in a twist over this..well not enough to report it... its harmless I guess..lollaugh.gif

Name origins are sorta cool though don't ya think?

Yes.. actually there was a thread on the General Off TOpic boards once on that... I think we all were in.. well I know you and I were posting in it... all about our names and where they came from.. do you recall it?

I kind of wondered... were you the only Geri you knew of grew of growing up? I ask because here in the states, it's a fairly old-fashioned name and not at all common for people born after about 1930 or so. I think the variation of that name "Jerilynn or Jerianne" kind of replaced Geraldine over time.

At the age of 4... my parents moved to a new county and new town... I winded up living next door to a girl called - Geraldine Kearney.. my mom used her as a baby sitter..... then when I attended St Marys JHS... I was in a class with another girl called Geraldine Coleman...

One night in a night club... in my local town... the DJ put on a request for a - Geraldine Hamill...who was going to live in Boston..it was her leaving party that night.....well such a laugh...my friends all looked over at me.. and said - OHHH YA KEPT THIS QUIET..! When were you gonna tell us you were heading for Boston Geri?? WELL?? <-- I was in stitches... for I had no idea there was another girl with the same 1st name and 2nd name as me...for I too was called Geraldine Hamillw00t.gif ........I was laughing so hard... they looked over and saw the other Geraldine Hamill up dancing on the dance floor ha ha....and even funnier when a few guys I was working with.. called me over to the bar to buy me what they called a goodbye drink.......I took the drink and said thanks- see ya on Monday guys and ta for the drink... they looked shocked... they thought I was headed for Boston..........well not my fault they got confused eh? laugh.gif

Nowadays people dont cal their kids Geraldine... Nahhh it is a bit old fashioned... the only famous Geraldines I know of off the top of my head is - Ginger Spice.. Geri Halliwell from the Spice Girls... lol.... I get Geri a lot too...

Anyone notice that yesterday they came out with the list of 2010 top baby names? Surprise, Isabella is number one for girls, and Jacob for boys. Twilight influence anyone? BARF. I like both names, but ugh. it's really quite fascinating how popular culture can influence names over time. currently, Victorian and biblical names (which are always popular anyway) are all the rage.

No I never saw it.... but the most common name for a baby girl over here is Katie... for the love of gum drops its almost as if every child born between 2000 - 2010 is called either Katie or Madision.......The boys - Joshua & Dyllian...

I didnt plan my kids name.. it just came out - Rebecca.. I knew the secI saw her.. I said - Look Gary its Rebecca.. then in a matter of moments I thought hold up... I had planned for Chloe or Rachael... not Rebecca.. ohh well its sticking now lol

Edited by Beckys_Mom

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Mr Walker

Researching every walker in australia and tracing them back about 500 years in scotland, i found a female relative whose name was Dardanella.

Made no sense until i saw her birth date. 25th April 1915. Then, being an aussie, i uunderstood immediately.

Tracing scottish descent is interesting. The eldest son was very often ( approx 80% of the time in my family)called after the paternal grandfather, making hundreds of years of alternating; andrews, peters, johns, james, williams, etc.

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Black Hound

Not familiar with the phrase, so I really don't know how to respond to the question raised.

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