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Beckys_Mom

Your Christian Name

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King Of Agony

My name is Ezra James Matthews

any Christian connotation there? :huh:

if there is, it would be a starling revelation!

Edited by King Of Agony

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MARAB0D

My name is Ezra James Matthews

any Christian connotation there? :huh:

if there is, it would be a starling revelation!

These all three names are recognised by Christianity...

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Ketzer

I know French only on the surface (and only because in late 70s I was weirdly investigated by KGB as a suspected French spy :) ) but my understanding is that it is much closer to Russian grammatically than to English. The nouns in French (same as in Spanish or Italian/Latin too) all have 3 genders, this is common for the Celtic languages (Slavic languages are related to Celtic more than to Germanic). So the male "dear" would sound as "Sher" while the female "dear" would sound as "Sheri", and this would be reflected in their spelling (the last vowel in French words is not vocal). This word "mon Cherie" (I guess) does not really mean "my dear", but rather "my little Cherry" or something tender of this kind. So it is really a novelty name as a "name", perhaps only appeared after Napoleonic wars when the occupation of France spread French culture Europe-wide.

My first language is French, and you're wrong. :P

Cheri and cherie sound the same, they're just spelled differently.

"Mon/ma cheri(e)" is just something you say to your significant other, like saying "my love" "my sweetie".

Also, nouns have two genders, masculine or feminine. Not three.

:tu:

Edited by Dasmian

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Paracelse

Interesting... But it seems at modern population sizes two names is not enough to exactly identify a person, so is this the reason why the French often have double names?

[/qute]

The French, Polish German Austrian people I know are mostly of Catholic origins that why they have more than one name.

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Paracelse

My first language is French, and you're wrong. :P

Cheri and cherie sound the same, they're just spelled differently.

"Mon/ma cheri(e)" is just something you say to your significant other, like saying "my love" "my sweetie".

Also, nouns have two genders, masculine or feminine. Not three.

:tu:

Noticed the error also, being US/French myself... but didn't want to hurt the poor guy's feeling.. only the Germans use Neutral (as far as I know)(Slavic people don't).

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MARAB0D

Noticed the error also, being US/French myself... but didn't want to hurt the poor guy's feeling.. only the Germans use Neutral (as far as I know)(Slavic people don't).

Thank you for pitying my feelings - despite you yourself appear at least as poor as me, denying the Slavic languages of the neutral gender. :P - "on, ona, ono" = "he, she, it"

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Beckys_Mom

My name is Ezra James Matthews

any Christian connotation there? huh.gif

Amazing... I thought it was just a couple that didnt get the OP... but faster than evolution... it grows!!! laugh.gif

Don't worry about it.. the more I see get confused with the OP... the funnier it gets lollaugh.gif

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mklsgl

Well Geri (happy Mothers Day! Or at least it is here in the US original.gif ) I think we sorta tapped out the OP, in the UK, it seems to pop up occasionally, as it does in AU, but in the USA, most of us have never seen "christian name" on any kind of form at all.

Name origins are sorta cool though don't ya think?

I kind of wondered... were you the only Geri you knew of grew of growing up? I ask because here in the states, it's a fairly old-fashioned name and not at all common for people born after about 1930 or so. I think the variation of that name "Jerilynn or Jerianne" kind of replaced Geraldine over time.

I need to ask my mother sometime how she came up with my name, Nicole. When I was born, it was extremely uncommon, I never knew any other Nicole's or Nikki's growing up. The name became very popular, like in the top 10 ten for baby girls briefly in the 80s and again in the early 90s, but then dropped down the popularity list again.

Anyone notice that yesterday they came out with the list of 2010 top baby names? Surprise, Isabella is number one for girls, and Jacob for boys. Twilight influence anyone? BARF. I like both names, but ugh. it's really quite fascinating how popular culture can influence names over time. currently, Victorian and biblical names (which are always popular anyway) are all the rage.

This thread got my intersted in researching a couple of names I've always been curious about. For example my best girlfriend's name is Sharon. I figured it was Hebrew and it is... but it's NOT actually a name. Sharon is the Hebrew word for "plain" it was never used as a first name until the 1920s and it gained popularity because there was a heroine character in a pulp science fiction series novel called the Rocketeer(?) and at that point, people started naming their girls after that character. LOL.

Just to clarify... Sharon is an area in Israel: The Sharon Plains in NW Israel, where the 'Rose of Sharon' grows. Thus, a common usage of Sharon was 'Rosasharon' (like the character in The Grapes of Wrath).

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