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[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood


Riaan
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Tweeling, it means nothing more than "two ones" (twee=two), a pair of look-alikes or something.

Jetty?? That's a harbour thing, right?

I think you better forget about that one.

I remember some ancient poem I read as a kid about two ones being twins, two ones became tw-ns - isn't language so odd but simple really..?

jut (v.1)

"to protrude," mid-15c., corruption of obsolete jet (see jetty). Related: Jutted; jutting.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=jut

OK, I'm gone.

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I remember some ancient poem I read as a kid about two ones being twins, two ones became tw-ns - isn't language so odd but simple really..?

jut (v.1)

"to protrude," mid-15c., corruption of obsolete jet (see jetty). Related: Jutted; jutting.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=jut

OK, I'm gone.

OK, and now I agree again with Knul...

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OK, like I said on the "Uffington Horse" thread, I didn't even want to post this here, but...

The Uffington Horse looks a lot like a running cat, and nothing like a horse at all to me.

So what am I saying: Stonehenge was seen as Freya's Hall, and this Uffington Horse was one of the cats pulling her cart:

freya1.gif

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To me this whole OLB thing is nothing but someone pulling bits and pieces from ancient (Greek, Roman, Frisian) legends and myths, saving what sounded sane and not superstitious, and then fabricating a believable, 'ancient' story about the Frisians, and how they ruled the earth.

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Hi all,

Greatings to yu'll! Wat een jolijt inderdaad :-) Nice content/posts here by the way.

Alewyn, don't bother timings -> I'm not the most regular poster myself.

Thnx for the feedback, also other comrades that seem to be skilled in language subjects. We learn from eachother.

I just found it very interesting to note that the story told in OLB about a sort of un-aknowledged past

(mostly verifiable in the language, myths) of, in this case, Frisian background after the deluge

is practically identical to the ideas of very well educated but yet open minded spirits as Becanus, Schriek and others.

Meaning practical identical to the story of the origin of the Belgae Scythe Cimbrians.

Whatever name it is given;

it can be traced to a same civilisation in the wide region what is now called Normandië, Belgium (Flanders+Wallonia), Netherlands (incl Frieslad), and Luxembourg.

Stating this civilisation must have spoken a most original language, coming directly from the language spoken before the Babylonian speach confusion.

Technically spoken the descendants from the son of Noah, Jafet.

In current Dutch, Flemish, Fries, some Danish, Zuid Afrikaans this can all be heard in certainy the dialectic used words and pronounciation.

So earlier and more authentic than Roman/Greek civilisation, being as old or even more authentic than Hebrew and all other languages that came after the babylonian confusion.

Can be derived from the fact that this particular language consists of the most short base words carrying a big respect for the nature of things it is defining.

A modern example: to define complete (full, entirely) Flemish/Dutch people use the word 'volledig'.

What a nice word is this that describes the totalness of things by putting together the 2 opposites 'Vol' (full) and 'ledig' (empty).

This is just a modern example of what Becanus, Schrieck meant by 'in respect for the nature of things'.

More important than the spot is the fact that an entire view on world history must be revised if this is true.

Now, let this discussion being allready held when Becanus and Scopius in the 17th century attacked Scalliger and his own calculated timeline of history.

Many papers/scripts were indeed forgeries, but they were used to give us history as we are told by the forgerers and as we know it now (Scaligerian on every front).

But thankfully, even now there are scientists all over the world who say that the dark ages are in fact real dark, as a black hole in history and that has its reasons.

People as Becanus were quickly discredited and from than on etymology is (just as many academic sciences and corporate journalism) a profession of parrots repeating

the question for an answer.

How de 'Bveldze' toal (the language of het Veldze gen, people living in the fields -> close to nature) can link Jol and Twin

BTW: Kadijk is a also village in Flanders

-- Jul and the the twin, that's easy connected --

Jul en de tweeling:

Sie you direct in da woord 't-weel-ing', nen t-whiel-ing as we say in Flemish.

't Wiel van Ju(wie)l, en de all-r-laste strijd (battle) die dan gestreden moet worden: het d(j)uel, zo ist-rad (van de tijd)!

Ju-we-lik is t'Huwelijk (Wedding). That's why it sounds as Tweejelijk.

In English you see influence from this Jultimate battle/duel of light/darkness (living/death) in midwinter in the word dual, pronounced from the origin as 'djuel',

coming from the Jul and the fight where light has to conquer darkness. Te end of a cycle(lus), the sun is born(the lus van Jul: Jul-lus).

Why can't Jol and Jolijt be derived from the same fest?

It is known that during this fest people were very glad, and pronounced their happiness.

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OK, and now I agree again with Knul...

Not sure what you mean by that - the OLB explains it as such:

. Those who were settled to the east of Denmark were called Jutten, because often they did nothing else than look for amber (jutten) on the shore.

The amber is the actual 'jutten' - it juts out of the shore, it's called jutten and so are the people who collect it.

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I know what I am asking... but try to read the whole of this thread.

It may take you a LOT of time, I DO know.

But at least you would sound like you know what you are talking about.

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OK, like I said on the "Uffington Horse" thread, I didn't even want to post this here, but...

The Uffington Horse looks a lot like a running cat, and nothing like a horse at all to me.

So what am I saying: Stonehenge was seen as Freya's Hall, and this Uffington Horse was one of the cats pulling her cart:

freya1.gif

Hmmmm, I dunno about that.

The White Horse seems likely to have had enough of it's own mythology to sustain it's presence as a horse imo.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_horse_(mythology)

Interesting it's connected to the Sun chariot though. Pegasus is another white horse.

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I know what I am asking... but try to read the whole of this thread.

It may take you a LOT of time, I DO know.

But at least you would sound like you know what you are talking about.

Who is this directed at? Van Gorp? The answer was very on topic I thought. Just take it as it comes Abe.

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Hi all,

Greatings to yu'll! Wat een jolijt inderdaad :-) Nice content/posts here by the way.

Alewyn, don't bother timings -> I'm not the most regular poster myself.

Thnx for the feedback, also other comrades that seem to be skilled in language subjects. We learn from eachother.

I just found it very interesting to note that the story told in OLB about a sort of un-aknowledged past

(mostly verifiable in the language, myths) of, in this case, Frisian background after the deluge

is practically identical to the ideas of very well educated but yet open minded spirits as Becanus, Schriek and others.

Meaning practical identical to the story of the origin of the Belgae Scythe Cimbrians.

Whatever name it is given;

it can be traced to a same civilisation in the wide region what is now called Normandië, Belgium (Flanders+Wallonia), Netherlands (incl Frieslad), and Luxembourg.

Stating this civilisation must have spoken a most original language, coming directly from the language spoken before the Babylonian speach confusion.

Technically spoken the descendants from the son of Noah, Jafet.

In current Dutch, Flemish, Fries, some Danish, Zuid Afrikaans this can all be heard in certainy the dialectic used words and pronounciation.

So earlier and more authentic than Roman/Greek civilisation, being as old or even more authentic than Hebrew and all other languages that came after the babylonian confusion.

Can be derived from the fact that this particular language consists of the most short base words carrying a big respect for the nature of things it is defining.

A modern example: to define complete (full, entirely) Flemish/Dutch people use the word 'volledig'.

What a nice word is this that describes the totalness of things by putting together the 2 opposites 'Vol' (full) and 'ledig' (empty).

This is just a modern example of what Becanus, Schrieck meant by 'in respect for the nature of things'.

More important than the spot is the fact that an entire view on world history must be revised if this is true.

Now, let this discussion being allready held when Becanus and Scopius in the 17th century attacked Scalliger and his own calculated timeline of history.

Many papers/scripts were indeed forgeries, but they were used to give us history as we are told by the forgerers and as we know it now (Scaligerian on every front).

But thankfully, even now there are scientists all over the world who say that the dark ages are in fact real dark, as a black hole in history and that has its reasons.

People as Becanus were quickly discredited and from than on etymology is (just as many academic sciences and corporate journalism) a profession of parrots repeating

the question for an answer.

How de 'Bveldze' toal (the language of het Veldze gen, people living in the fields -> close to nature) can link Jol and Twin

BTW: Kadijk is a also village in Flanders

-- Jul and the the twin, that's easy connected --

Jul en de tweeling:

Sie you direct in da woord 't-weel-ing', nen t-whiel-ing as we say in Flemish.

't Wiel van Ju(wie)l, en de all-r-laste strijd (battle) die dan gestreden moet worden: het d(j)uel, zo ist-rad (van de tijd)!

Ju-we-lik is t'Huwelijk (Wedding). That's why it sounds as Tweejelijk.

In English you see influence from this Jultimate battle/duel of light/darkness (living/death) in midwinter in the word dual, pronounced from the origin as 'djuel',

coming from the Jul and the fight where light has to conquer darkness. Te end of a cycle(lus), the sun is born(the lus van Jul: Jul-lus).

Why can't Jol and Jolijt be derived from the same fest?

It is known that during this fest people were very glad, and pronounced their happiness.

I see this as very much so: "Can be derived from the fact that this particular language consists of the most short base words carrying a big respect for the nature of things it is defining."

Many words are made up of 2 smaller words, very simple and very basic concepts - they do not seem to have been created in another language - the most basic meanings can come from Frisian etc.

So you think duel, might be relative to Jul, the battle of light over darkness, yes that is interesting thought.

duel seems to be from two - duo - twins and duels, jul...hmmm sounds logical.

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Who is this directed at? Van Gorp? The answer was very on topic I thought. Just take it as it comes Abe.

This was directed at anyone new.

Or a "Van Gorp" or anyone who hops on this thread and posts something we discussed ages ago.

I really can't blame them, a fkg 600-pages long thread, jesus.

But I also hope that these peeps understand that *I* sometimes may sound a bit grumpy.

Gorp, welcome, and sorry about my attitude.

I am an old fart with no life.

Some day you will understand.

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This was directed at anyone new.

Or a "Van Gorp" or anyone who hops on this thread and posts something we discussed ages ago.

I really can't blame them, a fkg 600-pages long thread, jesus.

But I also hope that these peeps understand that *I* sometimes may sound a bit grumpy.

Gorp, welcome, and sorry about my attitude.

I am an old fart with no life.

Some day you will understand.

lol :tu:

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When you really understand, it's no thumbs up.

It fckg sucks.

You should be glad you have to worry about kids, Puzz.

But yeah, this is going way off topic, and excuse me for being the one doing it.

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When you really understand, it's no thumbs up.

It fckg sucks.

You should be glad you have to worry about kids, Puzz.

But yeah, this is going way off topic, and excuse me for being the one doing it.

Nevermind. Sorry, your sarcasmic tone was funny. I thumbs up you for your nice welcome to Gorp.

Moving on...

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duel

1590s (from late 13c. in Latin form), from M.L. duellum "combat between two persons," by association with L. duo "two," but originally from L. duellum "war," an Old Latin form of bellum. Retained in poetic and archaic language and apparently given a special meaning in M.L. or L.L. of "one-on-one combat" on fancied connection with duo "two."

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=duel

English[edit] EtymologyFrom Medieval Latin duellum (“fight between two men”), under influence from Latin duo, from Old Latin duellum (whence Latin bellum (“war”)) < Proto-Indo-European *dāu-, *deu- (“to injure, destroy, burn”).

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/duel

Conflicting and confusing etymology, once again.

---------------

Actually duellum seems to come first - not bellum.

Latin[edit] Pronunciation(Classical) IPA: /ˈbel.lum/

Audio (Classical) (file)

[edit] Etymology 1From older form duellum. Then later changed the initial duellum into bellum (compare the change from duis to bis).

[edit] Nounbellum (genitive bellī); n, second declension

1.war  [quotations ▼]

Flavius Vegetius Sī vīs pācem parā bellum. If you want peace, prepare for war.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bellum#Latin

Latin[edit] EtymologyFrom Proto-Indo-European *dāu-, *deu- (“to injure, destroy, burn”). Cognate with Ancient Greek δύη (duē, “misery, pain”) and with Duellona (“goddess of war”). Duellum changed from the initial duellum into bellum (compare the change from duis to bis, and duonos to bonus).

[edit] Nounduellum (genitive duellī); n, second declension

1.(poetic, archaic) war

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/duellum#Latin

Edited by The Puzzler
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deu - " *deu- (“to injure, destroy, burn”)." is taking me to Deus. deu then as dei, might be day/night twins. Diana is possibly day or the light, with Apollo being night/dark. Aphrodite appears to me to mean and be, the first day.

Deus (Latin pronunciation: [ˈdeːʊs]) is Latin for "god" or "deity". Latin deus and dīvus "divine", are descended from Proto-Indo-European *deiwos, from the same root as *Dyēus, the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. Compare Greek Zeus (Ζεύς, pronounced zdeús), in Aeolic Greek Δεύς (deús).

In Classical Latin it was a general noun referring to any divine figure. In Late Latin, it came to be used mostly of the Christian God. It is inherited directly in the Romance languages, as French dieu, Spanish dios, Portuguese deus, Italian dio, etc.

In ancient Sanskrit, the word used for 'God' or a deity is Dev, Deva, or Devta (देव/देवता) which also means "[He/She] who gives or provides". [1] 'Dev' is a very commonly used word and also can be used for anything Divine or of God. [2] Many etymologists believe that the Sanskrit word 'Dev' is the root of Deus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deus

Zeus. These concepts are imo seen in things like the Clash of the Titans - The Titanomachy, dark vs light forces, war - the clash of the 2. Hector and Achilles, probably all these ancient battles are stories of light vs dark, good vs evil, good triumphing over dark.

Anyway, all a bit off topic I spose but still thinking really about exactly what the Juul is.

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WAK~

Here's an interesting one, thinking of jol, then geol in Old English, made me think of it could have been gol - g/j ol

gol into Wiki: gets goal (as in sport, goal post) except Cornish.

Cornish[edit] Alternative forms gool

[edit] PronunciationIPA: [ɡoːl]

[edit] Etymology 1 From Latin vigilia (“wakefulness, watch”) < vigil (“awake”) < Proto-Indo-European *weg- (“to be strong”).

[edit] Noun gol m. (plural golyow)

1.feast, fair

[edit] Etymology 2[edit] Noungol m. (plural golyow)

1.sail, veil

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gol

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A feast or fair????

From wak (aWAKe) basically, vigilance - watchfulness - viGIL/viGOL - viJOL? (Etymology1)

Phrases in the OLB lead me to think their is a connection here:

ie; and that outwitted our watchfulness. Eighty years afterwards, just at the time of the Juulfeest, they overran our country like a snowstorm driven by the wind

Edited by The Puzzler
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Could Jol/Juul really be the time of watchfullness - vigiliance?

Watching - for the completion of the carrier/Kroder. Keeping vigil? Watching for the watchstar..?

OK, so then looking in the Frisian dictionary for some word that might have gone into Latin and become vigil, pretty hard - but vi would be fi + gol maybe...

WHat I did find on the fi part is fire - which means feast.

fÆr-e

f 9, afries., F.: nhd. Feiertag; ne. feast (N.); Hw.: s. fÆr-ia (2); vgl. as. fÆra*,

ahd. fÆra; Q.: S, W; E.: germ. *fÆra, Sb., Feier, Feiertag; s. lat. fÐriae, F. Pl.,

Feiertage; vgl. idg. *dhÐs-, *dhýs-, *dheh1s-, Sb., Heiliges, Göttliches, Pokorny 259;

L.: Hh 27b, Hh 157, Rh 742b

fÆr-el-dei 1 und häufiger?, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Feiertag; ne. feast (N.); E.: s.

fÆr-e, dei; L.:

It could all have something to do with watching for the fire (wheel) to come back around, completing the circuit - watching for the fire. (sun) Gol words in Frisian seem to connect only to Gold.

feast-gold - watching = all this seems to equate to watching for the Sun (and horses) and then having a feast, celebration when it arrived (at it's goal/post/pole).

-----------------

Figol is a Celtic (ie; Cornish) name (no meaning) http://www.babynology.com/meaning-figol-m13.html

-----------------

Amber will represent the Sun. The museum holds the third largest amber specimen in Europe, the "Sun Stone", weighing over 3.5 kilograms, which has been stolen twice.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palanga_Amber_Museum

Edited by The Puzzler
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Was checking out the Brisingamen necklace some more Abe and it does appear that Frya might be the Sun or maybe the Sun's path. The burning fire left after the Sun raced by. The path, the track, the mar/mark.

This myth is also recorded in a Swedish folksong called the Thor song (18th Century), where Freyja is called Miss Frojenborg, "den väna solen" (the fair sun).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Br%C3%ADsingamen

The ring around her, could be the Sun's path, that picture in her chariot makes me think of the Sun being pulled along - by cats, horses...

Maybe Celtic torcs have this same significance.

Some of her attributes:

Freya is the Daughter of Time, as well as the patron and protectress of the human race. On her breast she wears "the jewel whose power cannot be resisted," Brisingamen.Brising meaning fire, specifically the fire of the enlightened mind and men meaning jewel. In ancient times the winter constellation which we today know as Orion was at that time called "Freya's Gown" by the Norse and Teutons, and the sword belt in Orion was called "Freya's Girdle."

She is as strong, beautiful and wise as any of the "Eldest Ones.

http://www.valkyrietower.com/freyja.html

Fire jewel...?

.The necklace embodies the circle of sacred fire, created as the sun passes through the four seasonal quarter.

http://www.valkyrietower.com/freyja.html

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I'm bored, excuse all my posts.

The cats. Felines. felus in Latin

fel

Latin[edit] Noun fel (genitive fellis); n, third declension

1.gall bladder

2.gall, bile

3.poison

4.bitterness, venom

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fel

fel-us

gall - poison, bitter

OLB:but the Golen celebrated all sorts of vile and monstrous festivals, which the inhabitants of the coast promoted with their wanton women and sweet poisonous wine.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#av

Dutch is interesting

Dutch[edit] PronunciationRhymes: -ɛl

Adjective fel (comparative feller, superlative felst)

1.bright (e.g. sunlight)

2.fierce

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fel#Latin

Here's use as an adverb, lol:

Adverb fel

1.fiercely

De Frisii waren een Germaans volk en net als verscheidene andere Germaanse volkeren wisten ze zich fel te verdedigen tegen de Romeinen[1] — The Frisii were a Germanic people and, just like various other Germanic peoples, they knew how to defend themselves fiercely against the Romans.

same page:

Old English Alternative forms felo, felu, fæle

Etymology Proto-Germanic *faliz (“wicked, cruel”). Akin to Old Frisian fal, Old Dutch fel "cruel, wrathful, bad, base", Danish fæl "hideous, disgusting, ghastly, grim".

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fel#Latin

It says Frisian fal, which leads to this:

Hungarian PronunciationIPA: /ˈfɒl/

Etymology 1From Proto-Finno-Ugric *paδɜ (“wall”).

1.wall

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fal#Old_Frisian

Cats seem alot like snakes when aggressive, hissing loudly and showing sharp venomous looking teeth...

The fallen, (the wicked, cruel ones) - fal (O.Fris) which cognate in Finno-Ugric is wall. (The wall falls down, the fallen ones, the wicked, cruel ones)

When the wall falls (Troy) they have been wicked, cruel - the wall may be relative to (Freyas) cats, which might be the path of the Sun, which in the Phaethon myth, did fall...

Edited by The Puzzler
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Zeus. These concepts are imo seen in things like the Clash of the Titans - The Titanomachy, dark vs light forces, war - the clash of the 2. Hector and Achilles, probably all these ancient battles are stories of light vs dark, good vs evil, good triumphing over dark.

it was more about reason overcoming brute force. Many people seem to misunderstand this point.

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The Winter solstice approaches. In the frigid night sky, the stars of 'Friggs's spindle' turn in the same place where we see the constellation of Orion. Outside our brightly lit homes, the darkness grows.

The longest time of Darkness in the year is called "Night of the Mother", as the Goddess labors to birth Light back into the world. At Winter solstice, the sun dies. Time stops. Then as Freya spins the wheel of fate once again, "Jul" in Norse, the sun is reborn. Her hand holds the spindle, a symbol of women's wisdom and skill. From her basket, she plucks a handful of wool, freshly combed but still unformed. Placing it on her wheel, she makes the ancient sure-handed gestures of the spinners, pulling the wool, winding it about the distaff, working it to a smooth and useful shape. So doing, she reminds us of her presence in the cycle of death and rebirth.

http://essom.tripod.com/id23.htm

The 'wheel' of fate. Jul=wheel - Sun dies, time stops, Freya spins her wheel and the sun is reborn. Orion's belt is the spindle, she winds him and he turns and the whole 'Universe' spins also.

Baldr as the Sun - Freya gives birth to him each new year - at Jul/Yule - 'wheel of fate' - the year.

and the celebration was called Yule, from the Norse word Jul, meaning wheel. The Christmas wreath, a symbol adapted from Frigga's "Wheel of Fate", reminds us of the cycle of the seasons and the continuity of life.

Again Jul is said as wheel.

The Christmas wreath, a symbol adapted from Frigga's "Wheel of Fate", reminds us of the cycle of the seasons and the continuity of life.

http://www.goddessgift.com/Pandora's_Box/Winter-Solstice.htm

Throughout the world gods and goddesses of light were being born during the Winter Solstice. The Egyptian goddess Isis delivered Horus whose symbol was the winged Sun. Mithras, the Unconquered Sun of Persia, was born during the solstice, as was Amaterasu, the Japanese Goddess of the Sun. Rhea gave birth to Saturn (son of the Father of Time), Hera conceives Hephaestus, and Quetzalcoatl and Lucina ("Little Light") also celebrate birthdays at this time. Lucia, saint or Goddess of Light, is honored from Italy to Sweden, crowned with candles to carry us through the darkness. The birth of Sarasvati, the Hindu goddess of knowledge and the Queen of Heaven, is also celebrated during Yule-tide.

http://www.goddessgift.com/Pandora's_Box/Winter-Solstice.htm

Frya might be this - she is the wheel, as I said, the wheel is the path the Sun makes as it wheels around - the circle around those figurines of Frya would be this - the necklace (jewelled necklace) could be the 12 constellations of the zodiac.

------------------

Orion's Belt is Freya's Staff:

The same three stars are known in Latin America as "The Three Marys".[5] They also mark the northern night sky when the sun is at its lowest point, and were a clear marker for ancient timekeeping. In Puerto Rico they are called the Three Kings.[6] The stars start appearing around the holiday of Epiphany, when the Biblical Magi visited the baby Jesus, which falls on January 6.

Richard Hinckley Allen lists many folk names for the Belt of Orion. The English ones include: Jacob's Rod or Staff; Peter's Staff; the Golden Yard-arm; the L, or Ell; the Ell and Yard; the Yard-stick, and the Yard-wand; the Ellwand; Our Lady's Wand; the Magi; the Three Kings; the Three Marys; or simply the Three Stars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion%27s_Belt

Edited by The Puzzler
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In OLB it is spelled with "JOL-" (JOLDON, JOLANDE).

The old Dutch spelling is "jolen".

If there would be an English version, it would be "to yool"?

It's obvious the words are related, just like jolig/ jolich/ jolly.

'Official' etymology is founded mostly on wild guesses.

When OLB is accepted to not be a hoax (as I am sure will happen), etymology as we know it will make a HUGE leap forward.

Official etymology is based on scientific studies of many generations of scientists not on pseudo-etymology of the type of jol-joldon, jol-Jolande, jol- jolly and jol-jollick, presented by Otharus. This non-scientific approach is certainly not a way to proof the authenticity of the OLB. It's just too silly for words.

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Once again Lumkamakja.

Text

Oera Linda Boek, Ottema, pag. 75,76. (Manuscript p. 53)

Ut thesse tocht is thjuskydnese fon Wodin bern, sa-r vppa burgum wryten is aend hir êskrêven. AndaAlder-gâmude (25) thêr reste en alde sêkaening. Sterik was sin nôme aend thahrop vr sina dêda was grât. Thisse alde rob hêde thrê nêva; Wodin thene aldestehêmde to Lumka-mâkja (26) bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us.Ênes was er hêrman wêst. Tünis aend Inka wêron sêkaemper aend just nw bi hjarafaederja anda Aldergâ-mude t-vs. As tha jonga kaempar nw bi ekkôrum kêmon,kêron hja Wodin to hjara hêrman jefta kaening ut, aend tha sêkaempar kêronTünis to-ra sêkaening aend Inka to hjara skelte bî thêr nacht. Tha stjurargvngon thâ nêi tha Dênnemarka fâra, thêr nâmon hja Wodin mith sin wigandlikalandwêr in. [p. 76] Wînd was rum aend alsa wêron hja an en âmerîng (27) to Skênland.

Uit deze tocht is degeschiedenis van Wodin ontstaan, die op de burchten gegrift is, en hier isuitgeschreven. Aan de Aldergamude daar ruste een oude zeekoning, Sterik waszijn naam, en de roep zijner daden was groot. Deze oude rob had drie neven;Wodin de oudste woonde te Lumkamakia bij de Eemude in Oostflyland bij zijnouders. Eenmaal was hij heerman geweest. Teunis en Inka waren zeestrijders, enjuist nu bij hunnen oom aan de Aldergamude. Toen nu de jonge krijgers bijelkaar kwamen, kozen ze Wodin tot hun heerman of koning, en de zeekampers kozenTeunis tot hun zeekoning en Inka tot hun schout bij nacht. De zeelieden voerentoen naar de Denemarken. Daar namen ze Wodin met zijn krijgshaftige landweer[77] aan boord. De wind was ruim, en zo waren ze in een ommezien in Schoonland.

12. From this expedition the history of Wodin sprang, which is inscribed on the burghs, and is here copied: 13. At Aldergamude there lived an old sea-king whose name was Sterik, and whose deeds were famous. This old fellow had three nephews. Wodin,the eldest, lived at Lumkamakia, near the Emude, in Astflyland, with hisparents. He had once commanded troops. Tunis and Inka were naval warriors, andwere just then staying with their father at Aldergamude. 14. When the youngwarriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their commander orking, and the naval force chose Tunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navigators then sailed for Denamark, where they took on boardWodin and his valiant host. 15. The wind was fair, so they arrived immediatelyin Skenland.

I am pretty sure, that Lumkamakia is on the northwest shore of Heligoland (= Holy Land), which was Frisian territory. The exact place is Lummenfelsen, 60 metres high cliffs. You may find the place and beautiful photoshots on Google Maps Helgoland, Lummenfelsen. Helgoland was the religious epicentrum of the old Frisians. Helgoland is northeast of the Eems mouth between the rivers Eems and Weser. It played an important role in the Viking times. The origin of the name Lumkamakja has not yet completely established. The text shows, that Lumkamakja was on a short distance from both Danmark and Scandinavia. Alcuin reports, that St. Willebrord tried to baptize the people to the Christian faith:

Alcuin (735-804), The Life of Willebrord , written ca . 796: Now whilst this energetic preacher of the Word was pursuing his journey he came to a certain island on the boundary between the Frisians and the Danes, which the people of those parts call Fositeland,[l] after a god named Fosite, whom they worship and whose temples stood there. This place was held by the pagans in such great awe that none of the natives would venture to meddle with any of the cattle that fed there nor with anything else, nor dare they draw water from the spring that bubbled up there except in complete silence. On this island the man of God wasdriven ashore by a storm and waited for some days until the gale died down and fair weather made it possible to set sail again. He set little store by thesuperstitious sacredness ascribed to the spot, or by the savage cruelty of theking, who was accustomed to condemn violators of the sacred objects to the most cruel death. Willibrord baptized three persons in the fountain in the name of the Blessed Trinity and gave orders that some of the cattle should beslaughtered as food for his company. When the pagans saw this they expected that the strangers would become mad or be struck with sudden death. Noticing,however, that they suffered no harm, the pagans, terror & shy; stricken and astounded,reported to the king what they had witnessed.

[1] Fositeland orHeligoland.

PS. Alcuin was a coaevus of Liko.

Edited by Knul
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Nevermind. Sorry, your sarcasmic tone was funny. I thumbs up you for your nice welcome to Gorp.

Moving on...

Heh, it wasn't even meant to sound sarcastic, I just wanted to say that sometimes someone new shows up who is interested in this topic, and then I sorta chase them off by being grumpy.

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