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THE MATRIX

Young People Abandoning Organized Religion

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THE MATRIX

Walking away from church

Organized religion's increasing identification with conservative politics is a turnoff to more and more young adults. Evangelical Protestantism has been hit hard by this development.

The most rapidly growing religious category today is composed of those Americans who say they have no religious affiliation. While middle-aged and older Americans continue to embrace organized religion, rapidly increasing numbers of young people are rejecting it.

As recently as 1990, all but 7% of Americans claimed a religious affiliation, a figure that had held constant for decades. Today, 17% of Americans say they have no religion, and these new "nones" are very heavily concentrated among Americans who have come of age since 1990. Between 25% and 30% of twentysomethings today say they have no religious affiliation — roughly four times higher than in any previous generation.

So, why this sudden jump in youthful disaffection from organized religion? The surprising answer, according to a mounting body of evidence, is politics. Very few of these new "nones" actually call themselves atheists, and many have rather conventional beliefs about God and theology. But they have been alienated from organized religion by its increasingly conservative politics.

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maca02

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regeneratia

Thank you for providing this. I collect religion research, with a data base on this computer as well as the old computer. I have been watching the trends in spirituality and church attendence since the mid-90's. The mid-90's census began to mark a trend in people feeling more spiritual than ever before, along with more and more people leaving the church. The number one reason why people sited a discontinuation or reduced church attendance in this county was due to politics in the pulpit, which they did not like.

I will just give some links to consider, and if you want more, it is easy to access:

The coming evangelical collapse

An anti-Christian chapter in Western history is about to begin. But out of the ruins, a new vitality and integrity will rise.

By Michael Spencer

from the March 10, 2009 edition

http://www.csmonitor.com/2009/0310/p09s01-coop.html

ONEIDA, KY. - We are on the verge – within 10 years – of a major collapse of evangelical Christianity. This breakdown will follow the deterioration of the mainline Protestant world and it will fundamentally alter the religious and cultural environment in the West.

Study: Believers' inferences about God's beliefs are uniquely egocentric

November 30th, 2009 in Medicine & Health / Psychology & Psychiatry

http://www.physorg.com/print178819089.html

http://www.physorg.com/news176210945.html

Growth in secular attitudes leaves Americans room for belief in God

October 31st, 2009 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences

(PhysOrg.com) -- The nature of the American religious experience is changing as a rising number of people report having no formal religious affiliation, even though the number of Americans who say they pray is increasing, according to a new survey from the University of Chicago.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200210/jenkins====================

ECONOMY-US: Foreclosing on God

By Katy Bolger*

http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=46497

NEW YORK, Apr 14 (IPS) - The red brick St. Andrews Anglican Church in wealthy Easton, Maryland, was known for its open door. It hosted family movie nights, and weekend spaghetti dinners. Most people had no idea anything was amiss, until the bank took the key, and the church building was foreclosed and sold at auction.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-03/ru-rsl032410.php

Rice study looks at role of private foundations in supporting religion

While millions of Americans make individual contributions weekly at their places of worship, a new study by a Rice University sociologist finds private foundations have a disproportionate influence on the religious sector -- despite the fact that their contributions constitute only a fraction of all philanthropy to religion.

Snip

Private foundations are influential in religion "because of their institutional independence, financial resources and unique ability to redirect energies within an institutional field," Lindsay and Wuthnow wrote.

Public release date: 15-Apr-2010

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-04/uon-suc040910.php

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Study: US church attendance steady, but makeup of churchgoers changes

Women, Catholics, southerners see their impact wane

Survey: Americans don't know much about religion

Reuters – Rachel Zoll, Ap Religion Writer – Tue Sep 28, 12:02 am ET

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39392563/ns/us_news/

Can 'unchanging truths' combat spiritual drift?

07:04 PM

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/religion/post/2009/05/66702011/1?csp=34

Christianity Today has a resounding editorial that's intended as a comeback to weeks of gloomy statistics, and equally gloomy headlines, on the state of Christianity in America now.

http://www.americanreligionsurvey-aris.org/

American Religious Identification Survey is Third in Landmark Series

Para español oprima aquí

Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible

* Story Highlights

* Meet a real-life "Angels & Demons" professor

* Biblical scholar says most of New Testament is a forgery

* Scholar's work gains audience skeptical of church

* Scholar's mom no longer talks to him about his books

updated 10:07 a.m. EDT, Fri May 15, 2009

By John Blake

CNN

http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/05/15/bible.critic/index.html

http://www.freep.com/article/20090310/NEWS07/90310012/-1/rss07

More Americans say they have no religion

By RACHEL ZOLL, AP Religion Writer

Mon Mar 9, 12:14 am ET

A wide-ranging study on American religious life found that the Roman Catholic population has been shifting out o of the Northeast to the Southwest, the percentage of Christians in the nation has declined and more people say they have no religion at all.

And this one is a really amazing read:

October 2002 Atlantic

We stand at a historical turning point, the author argues—one that is as epochal for the Christian world as the original Reformation. Around the globe Christianity is growing and mutating in ways that observers in the West tend not to see. Tumultuous conflicts within Christianity will leave a mark deeper than Islam's on the century ahead

by Philip Jenkins

The Next Christianity

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/2002/10/jenkins.htm

And there is so much more to list.

Edited by regeneratia

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angelusarcane

Thank you for posting this article. The founding fathers of America were pretty adamant on the seperation of church and state. What led to the mixing of the two in the 1970's? I personally

don't know, but whatever it was overall helped shape the US's indentity to the rest of the world that is still being felt today. America is seen negatively by nations who are Theocracies and many that are

either Monarchies or Democratic Republics even. Throughout history religion has been an excuse to invade contries and trample the native beliefs for the sake of greed and perhaps in some aspects religious zeal.

I didn't notice it as much when I was a kid growing up with Regan, Bush sr and then Clinton, but I did notice it with Bush Jr.

While we have things like "in god we trust" printed on our money and God is mentioned in the pledge of alegience, it seems to be more of a metaphor to me than anything literal. Bush JR and his administration seemed to use their religion as an excuse to combat the infidels....sounds to me like the same rhetoric Bin Laden used to incite people to bomb the US.

I am thankful that this generation is walking away from ideas like that and are generally more accepting individuals than their parents.

To Regeneratia, thank you for all those links, i'll read more of them over time, there's alot to take in, but it's nice to see individual and varied points of veiw on this subject.

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regeneratia

Thank you for posting this article. The founding fathers of America were pretty adamant on the seperation of church and state. What led to the mixing of the two in the 1970's? I personally

don't know, but whatever it was overall helped shape the US's indentity to the rest of the world that is still being felt today. America is seen negatively by nations who are Theocracies and many that are

either Monarchies or Democratic Republics even. Throughout history religion has been an excuse to invade contries and trample the native beliefs for the sake of greed and perhaps in some aspects religious zeal.

I didn't notice it as much when I was a kid growing up with Regan, Bush sr and then Clinton, but I did notice it with Bush Jr.

While we have things like "in god we trust" printed on our money and God is mentioned in the pledge of alegience, it seems to be more of a metaphor to me than anything literal. Bush JR and his administration seemed to use their religion as an excuse to combat the infidels....sounds to me like the same rhetoric Bin Laden used to incite people to bomb the US.

I am thankful that this generation is walking away from ideas like that and are generally more accepting individuals than their parents.

To Regeneratia, thank you for all those links, i'll read more of them over time, there's alot to take in, but it's nice to see individual and varied points of veiw on this subject.

You are welcome. And there is more of it.

You asked what lead to the mixing of religion and politics: I think Billy Graham got high on pot one day and had a dream. Just joking. Or am I? Anyway, it happened at the same time the CIA was hauling cocaine and pot into the country, to hand out to the inner city kids, to fund the contras in Central America.

Edited by regeneratia

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angelusarcane

You are welcome. And there is more of it.

You asked what lead to the mixing of religion and politics: I think Billy Graham got high on pot one day and had a dream. Just joking. Or am I? Anyway, it happened at the same time the CIA was hauling cocaine and pot into the country, to hand out to the inner city kids, to fund the contras in Central America.

This makes sense with the power the Mexican drug cartels seem to have these days. I wonder why most politicans are against legalizing pot since aparently it helps their religious conversion...

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regeneratia

This makes sense with the power the Mexican drug cartels seem to have these days. I wonder why most politicans are against legalizing pot since aparently it helps their religious conversion...

My observation is that Christianity will survive in this country merely due to the migrants come up from the south. I don't call them immigrants. I think they migrate. And I have no problem with that.

Too many high up government officials are making money now on pot being illegal. We will have to force them to legalize it. They are not going to do it because we are complaining about it.

Think about it, how it might effect the deficit if pot was legal and taxed three times or more as cigarettes.

Edited by regeneratia

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angelusarcane

My observation is that Christianity will survive in this country merely due to the migrants come up from the south. I don't call them immigrants. I think they migrate. And I have no problem with that.

Too many high up government officials are making money now on pot being illegal. We will have to force them to legalize it. They are not going to do it because we are complaining about it.

Think about it, how it might effect the deficit if pot was legal and taxed three times or more as cigarettes.

I think we'd be in surplus, which is where the government doesn't want us. At one point under Bill Clinton we were, but conservative anythings seem to feel more comfortable operating in the red. I do not pretend

to understand why politicians do things, I just generally think they are all mentally disturbed to the point of commitment to a loony farm.

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regeneratia

I think we'd be in surplus, which is where the government doesn't want us. At one point under Bill Clinton we were, but conservative anythings seem to feel more comfortable operating in the red. I do not pretend

to understand why politicians do things, I just generally think they are all mentally disturbed to the point of commitment to a loony farm.

Yeah, conservatives are not interested in a balanced budget, as the GOP operates in the red these days in a red state, because the GOP moderates won't donate to Religious Rite candidates. In reaction to this, in the election previous to this one, the state GOP party, run by the Religious Rite operating in the red, announced that all GOP candidates had to go thru a GOP purity test. The GOP massively lost that election and we, residing in a red state, elected the Dem. Gov. who now is up there with Obama, guarding our health department.

Also this article certainly indicates that Palin and O'Donnell are way out of touch with today's youth. But maybe Palin can start a teen-age motherhood trend in this country. Who knows?!

And I have always said that the Religious Rite will be the end of this country's Christianity as we currently know it, all due to politics in the pulpit.

Edited by regeneratia

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ChloeB

Great article, thanks for posting this. Religious groups have been rallying their numbers and infiltrating their views into our politics, throwing their weight, bullying, and this backlash as a result of those actions is not surprising and well-deserved.

Throughout the 1990s and into the new century, the increasingly prominent association between religion and conservative politics provoked a backlash among moderates and progressives, many of whom had previously considered themselves religious. The fraction of Americans who agreed "strongly" that religious leaders should not try to influence government decisions nearly doubled from 22% in 1991 to 38% in 2008, and the fraction who insisted that religious leaders should not try to influence how people vote rose to 45% from 30%.

This backlash was especially forceful among youth coming of age in the 1990s and just forming their views about religion. Some of that generation, to be sure, held deeply conservative moral and political views, and they felt very comfortable in the ranks of increasingly conservative churchgoers. But a majority of the Millennial generation was liberal on most social issues, and above all, on homosexuality. The fraction of twentysomethings who said that homosexual relations were "always" or "almost always" wrong plummeted from about 75% in 1990 to about 40% in 2008. (Ironically, in polling, Millennials are actually more uneasy about abortion than their parents.)

Just as this generation moved to the left on most social issues — above all, homosexuality — many prominent religious leaders moved to the right, using the issue of same-sex marriage to mobilize electoral support for conservative Republicans. In the short run, this tactic worked to increase GOP turnout, but the subsequent backlash undermined sympathy for religion among many young moderates and progressives. Increasingly, young people saw religion as intolerant, hypocritical, judgmental and homophobic. If being religious entailed political conservatism, they concluded, religion was not for them.

A-freakin-men.

Edited by ChloeB

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regeneratia

Public release date: 23-Oct-2008

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-10/tu-spa102308.php

Temple University

Spirituality protects against depression better than church attendance

Those who worship a higher power often do so in different ways. Whether they are active in their religious community, or prefer to simply pray or meditate, new research out of Temple University suggests that a person's religiousness – also called religiosity – can offer insight into their risk for depression.

October 30, 2007

http://www.christiancentury.org/article_print.lasso?id=3768

Polls find shifts by young evangelicals

Are evangelical young adults shifting away from the Republican Party and becoming more estranged from contemporaries because of how closely evangelical Christians are linked to "antihomosexual" views?

Evangelicals Are Addicted To Porn

http://christiannews.christianet.com/1154951956.htm

If there could be one place protected from the cancerous infection of pornography and sexual misconducts, one would assume that the Christian church would be that sanctuary. But, recent research is revealing that no one is immunized against the vice-grip clutches of sexual addictive behaviors. The people who struggle with the repeated pursuit of sexual gratification include church members, deacons, staff, and yes, even clergy. And, to the surprise of many, a large number of women in the church have become victim to this widespread problem. Recently, the world's most visited Christian portal, ChristiaNet.com, conducted a survey asking site visitors eleven questions about their personal sexual conduct. Survey results are eye-popping and expose the truth about who is and who is not at risk for developing an ongoing problem with certain repeated sexual acts. Survey says - immunity does not exist.

Public release date: 16-Aug-2005

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2005-08/uom-acs081505.php

University of Manchester

As congregations shrink, half of children with two religious parents reject church

Findings of a new study by Dr David Voas of The University of Manchester, funded by the ESRC, suggest that religious belief is declining faster than attendance at services in the UK, and that parents' beliefs, practices and affiliations have the biggest impact on children.

12 June 2006 Engaging with Faith groups

under embargo until 11 Jun 2006 23:01 GMT

How The Wrong Approach Can Be A Turn-Off For Believers

Attempts to get faith groups involved in the wider community can lead to cynicism among members, unless carefully handled, according to a new booklet published by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), called ‘Faith-based voluntary action’.

Moves by politicians and officials to encourage greater participation can backfire if, for instance, they are seen as claiming ‘grass roots legitimacy’ on the basis of a group’s involvement, without actually engaging with its values and practices.

Reference URL

http://www.esrc.co.uk

I am not good at keeping the alphagalileo sources, for some reason. I am sure you can find it there.

Public release date: 14-Mar-2007

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-03/asu-dga031407.php

Arizona State University

Does God answer prayer? ASU research says 'yes'

TEMPE, Ariz. -- Does God or some other type of transcendent entity answer prayer?

The answer, according to a new Arizona State University study published in the March journal Research on Social Work Practice, is “yes.” David R. Hodge, an assistant professor of social work in the College of Human Services at Arizona State University, conducted a comprehensive analysis of 17 major studies on the effects of intercessory prayer – or prayer that is offered for the benefit of another person – among people with psychological or medical problems. He found a positive effect.

When God sanctions violence, believers act more aggressively

http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/story.php?id=3191

http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/releases/print.php?htdocs/releases/plainstory.php?id=3191&html=

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Reading violent scriptures increases aggressive behavior, especially among believers, a new study finds. The study by University of Michigan social psychologist Brad Bushman and colleagues helps to illuminate one of the ways that violence and behavior are linked. "To justify their actions, violent people often claim that God has sanctioned their behavior," said Bushman, faculty associate at the U-M Institute for Social Research and lead author of the article published in the March 2007 issue of Psychological Science. "Christian extremists, Jewish reactionaries and Islamic fundamentalists all can cite scriptures that seem to encourage or at least support aggression against unbelievers."

14 December 2006

Pentecostals Overtake Methodists in England

under embargo until 19 Dec 2006 00:01 GMT

http://www.alphagalileo.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=readrelease&releaseid=517252&ez_search=1

Pentecostals now outnumber Methodists at church services in England, according to new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

It means that as the festival of Christmas approaches, this fastest growing group within Christianity, globally and in the UK, has moved into third place behind Catholics and Anglicans in terms of attendance.

Dr. David Voas, a senior researcher at Manchester University’s School of Social Sciences, specialises in examining religious change in modern society. He said: “Methodism, a branch of Christianity that originated in England and spread around the world, is dying in Britain. By contrast, immigration from Africa and elsewhere has lead to growth in Pentecostal churches, where the worship style is more flamboyant.”

23 November 2006 Women priests will “save Church from sinking”

under embargo until 26 Nov 2006 00:01 GMT

http://www.alphagalileo.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=readrelease&releaseid=516801&ez_search=1

Whether or not ordained women have had a significant impact over the past decade, they will save the Church from sinking in the future, according to ESRC-sponsored research at the University of Manchester.

Ahh, and my amazing mentor, SOPHIA!!

29 November 2006 World’s oldest ritual discovered - Worshipped the python 70,000 years ago

In the excavation they found more than 13,000 artifacts. Photo: Sheila Coulson

under embargo until 30 Nov 2006 09:00 GMT

A startling archaeological discovery this summer changes our understanding of human history. While, up until now, scholars have largely held that man’s first rituals were carried out over 40, 000 years ago in Europe, it now appears that they were wrong about both the time and place.

Post Embargo note

High res pictures can be downloaded from: http://www.admin.uio.no/ia/apollon-english/

For more details, please find enclosed interview with Sheila Coulson (to be published in the University of Oslo’s research magazine Apollon (PDF)

11 December 2006 Grandparents link with church-going

under embargo until 15 Dec 2006 00:01 GMT

http://www.alphagalileo.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=readrelease&releaseid=517150&ez_search=1EMBARGOED UNTIL 00:01HRS FRIDAY 15th DECEMBER 2006

As Christmas approaches, people are more likely to attend religious services if their grandparents did, according to a new study at the University of Manchester, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

26 June 2006 “God is back on the agenda for science”, says Ward

Title

Pascal’s Fire

Author: Keith Ward

Publication type Book (Paperback)

Publication Date 27 June 2006

ISBN 1-85168-446-8

Number of pages 270

Page size 200 x 130

Price £ 9.99

Review copy available FionaM@fmcm.co.uk

God was declared dead by Friedrich Nietzsche in 1883 and will be announced very much alive by Professor Keith Ward tomorrow.

Professor Ward, Gresham Professor of Divinity, and a Fellow of the British Academy, who has become well known for his views on the relationship between science and religion, will launch his new book, Pascal’s Fire, at Gresham College on Tuesday 27 June at 6pm.

In Pascal’s Fire, published by Oneworld Publications, Professor Ward will assert that although God may indeed have come under severe attack several times over the centuries, there has been a recent shift, which has led to scientists, particularly theoretical physicists, discussing God again.

“If you walk into any good book shop, prominently on display will be many popular books on science by reputable scientists,” he said. “It has become quite usual for these books to contain a final chapter on God.”

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TheVeryFirstDinosaur

This pleases me.

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markdohle

Thanks for the article it was interesting. However, as a child of the 60's, well more or less, my generation also walked away from their religion, now they are older and have come back. This could happen again with the young today. I think it is about community just as much as about faith.

Things swing back and forth, so don't start celebrating too soon :rolleyes: . Also the children of librals often go to the other side of the divide, the same goes for many religous friends of mine, who by the way are of all ages who do the exact opposite of their parents. It is sort of like the son or daughter of a strick minister, they become wilder than anyone.

Also in the catholic church, of the young people who belong, I would say the majority are very conservative, again a swing from the liberal 60's.

Peace

mark

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Dragan

Awww Americas growing up! How cute.

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markdohle

Awww Americas growing up! How cute.

Not sure about that, we seem to be a culture more in their adolecent phrase than in any thing adult like.

Peace

Mark

Edited by markdohle

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regeneratia

Thanks for the article it was interesting. However, as a child of the 60's, well more or less, my generation also walked away from their religion, now they are older and have come back. This could happen again with the young today. I think it is about community just as much as about faith.

Things swing back and forth, so don't start celebrating too soon :rolleyes: . Also the children of librals often go to the other side of the divide, the same goes for many religous friends of mine, who by the way are of all ages who do the exact opposite of their parents. It is sort of like the son or daughter of a strick minister, they become wilder than anyone.

Also in the catholic church, of the young people who belong, I would say the majority are very conservative, again a swing from the liberal 60's.

Peace

mark

And where are your sources?

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regeneratia

Not sure about that, we seem to be a culture more in their adolecent phrase than in any thing adult like.

Peace

Mark

I thank Fox news for that particular trend.

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markdohle

And where are your sources?

Well I grew up in the 60's and I was constantly reading on how my generation hated authority, challenged the church on social issues, and simply stopped going. Also student unrest was also front and center in the press. It was at this time the Eastern religions became popular and a little later in the 70's, the new age started to become very fashionable as well. Drugs, sex and rock and roll also played a big part in the rebellion. So I was part of it, sort of, and many of my friends who were radicals or now conservative, like their parents in many ways, but not all of course.

Being Catholic I have noticed that many of the young people (who have not left) in the church today, have rebelled against Vatican two and are now among the most conservative in the church. So again I am living through it. In our parishes it can be difficult for the senior priest and the priest not many years out of the seminary to communicate, though they still work together. The Latin Mass is starting to make a come back, and the young people are often in the forefront. So it goes, perhaps it is a good thing. The young can't just be like their parents, they have to find their own way. The communications media makes it easier to make certain ways of thinking or doing a cultural phenomenon that was impossible just a few generations ago. So today, like in the 60's much of it was created by the press, since teenagers need to belong, so that was a part of it. Lots of money was made off the clothes and of course the rebellious music that was pushed by members of the 'older' generation, who were good business men.

As for sources apart from my own experiences, well I am one of them, or anyone from my generation. Though I guess articles from that time, which I read as a very young man can still be found.

Peace

mark

Edited by markdohle

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markdohle

I thank Fox news for that particular trend.

Well depends which side of the politcal fence one is on :wacko:. Both sides spend a lot of time demonizing one another.

Peace

mark :gun:

Edited by markdohle

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Black Red Devil

Young people abandoning religion.

It's just the progressive result of the philosophical and social transformation in our human society, not only in the US. Eventually, Secular Humanism will advance and spread across all four corners of the world and finally eradicate all rememberances of an old dogma called religion, imho of course. It's only a matter of time.

Edited by BlackRedLittleDevil

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markdohle

Young people abandoning religion.

It's just the progressive result of the philosophical and social transformation in our human society, not only in the US. Eventually, Secular Humanism will advance and spread across all four corners of the world and finally eradicate all rememberances of an old dogma called religion, imho of course. It's only a matter of time.

Ok, however in China Religion is making a big come back and Christianity is growing faster than any of them, this is a good page that discusses all the different religions in China:

Also here is a good page reviewing the book (God is back), it is the New York times book review.

Even if you are right (which I doubt) you will be long dead along with your grand children before it happens. We seem to be wired to seek a transcendent relationship with the Infinite, call it what you want. Now the power of organized religion to control its followers is another matter. As people become more educated they will think more for themselves. That means one can still remained in a religion and still think for oneself or become 'spiritual' and hang out with those who agree with a certain way of interrupting life.

Peace

Mark

Edited by markdohle

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regeneratia

Well I grew up in the 60's and I was constantly reading on how my generation hated authority, challenged the church on social issues, and simply stopped going. Also student unrest was also front and center in the press. It was at this time the Eastern religions became popular and a little later in the 70's, the new age started to become very fashionable as well. Drugs, sex and rock and roll also played a big part in the rebellion. So I was part of it, sort of, and many of my friends who were radicals or now conservative, like their parents in many ways, but not all of course.

Meanwhile, the CIA was hauling into the country the drugs that they were taking, probably also at the same time, the first to coin the phrase "hippi". IMHO, it is time to stop funding the CIA. It is time to call for an end to it, a total and complete dismantling.

Edited by regeneratia

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regeneratia

Well depends which side of the politcal fence one is on :wacko:. Both sides spend a lot of time demonizing one another.

Peace

mark :gun:

I am not near a political fence. There are none that fit my values and morals.

Again, the Religious Rite, in repressing sexuality and normal human sexual functioning, have become addicted to internet porn (source already provided), and I speculate, some with serious kink. It is a party of hyprocrasy, a "do as I say, not as I do" party, where someone makes a decision and the poor, uneducated, GOP cows merely follow the mental GOP feedbag, to await being milked of their money by the very GOP leading people they support, the very people who are most willing to also lie to them.

Then there is other party with their hyprocrasy, just as addicted to the desires of the rich, and corporate America. I am not as familiar with the Democrats, because I didn't participate in them. But then I wasn't as betrayed by them as I was by the GOP.

I would love to see Pelosi step down. I would love to see the GOP totally kick out the Religious Rite from the party they hijacked.

Again, the main reason these youth are leaving the church is all about politics in the pulpit. This country needs to get a serious grip on what is currently happening here.

And wishing peace on you too, Mark.

Edited by regeneratia

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Beckys_Mom

A lot of youngsters abandon religion it’s not a surprise by any means

Take the catholic church for example... I recall being sent each week...I along with many of kids my age had to sit amongst the adults and listen to a priests sermon.... it bored the life out of us.....for when the priest preached from the bible...we didn’t understand it like the adults...that’s why we saw it as boring....

Unlike my own child...she gets to attend a Sunday school...she is taught the bible at a kids level...made it fun for her too..that is why she likes it

The catholic church had not time for kids to be honest ...kids had to sit and try and understand a sermon that all adults fully understood....

So so many drifted from the church....

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Agent. Mulder

Awww Americas growing up! How cute.

Finally leaving behind those imaginary friends.

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