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Should Pluto Be a Planet After All?


thefinalfrontier

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Now that Pluto may have regained its status as the largest object in the outer solar system, should astronomers consider giving it back another former title — that of full-fledged planet?

Pluto was demoted to a newly created category, "dwarf planet," in 2006, partly because of the discovery a year earlier of Eris, another icy body from Pluto's neighborhood.Eris was thought to be bigger than Pluto until November 6, when astronomers got a chance to recalculate Eris' size.

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Imo pluto should have just been left as it was but it dont matter really cos pluto is still there and will be for eons to come, dwarf or full status,

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the only reason the brought in the dwarf planet stuff is so that no one would have to memorize the names of 20 or more planets.

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Now it appears that Pluto reigns — though only by the slimmest of margins (the numbers are so close as to be nearly indistinguishable, when uncertainties are taken into account).

I'd say leave it where it's been settled for now.

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This sorta makes me think of that Facebook group "If Pluto isn't a planet, then midgets aren't people" :lol:

I reckon they should give it back it's planet status. Planet, dwarf planet... It's just nit picking. It's still a damn planet!

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This sorta makes me think of that Facebook group "If Pluto isn't a planet, then midgets aren't people" :lol:

I reckon they should give it back it's planet status. Planet, dwarf planet... It's just nit picking. It's still a damn planet!

Yes... midgets are still people. Just as planets and dwarf planets are still celestial bodies.

Pluto falls on the scale between planet and asteroid, it doesn't fall into the classification as detailed for planets, so it's been put in dwarf planets.

With the current system, it's less to do with size. Even is a outer body was discovered with the mass of Earth, unless it had cleared it's orbital plane of debris, it would still not qualify as a planet.

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This sorta makes me think of that Facebook group "If Pluto isn't a planet, then midgets aren't people" :lol:

I reckon they should give it back it's planet status. Planet, dwarf planet... It's just nit picking. It's still a damn planet!

Yeah, let's get rid of the dwarf planet classification and call them all planets. I can't wait until most of the 200 dwarf planets that are speculated to exist in the Kuiper belt get discovered so that we have so many planets that we can no longer memorize their names :wacko:

Pluto not being a full planet still just feels wrong.

Quiz: Which one of the planets in the following picture looks out of place?

solar_system_2.jpg

Edited by Der
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Yes... midgets are still people. Just as planets and dwarf planets are still celestial bodies.

Pluto falls on the scale between planet and asteroid, it doesn't fall into the classification as detailed for planets, so it's been put in dwarf planets.

With the current system, it's less to do with size. Even is a outer body was discovered with the mass of Earth, unless it had cleared it's orbital plane of debris, it would still not qualify as a planet.

Wasnt it not long ago they found a body out there and named it Sedna? If memory serves correct that body had more mass than Pluto did, I could be wrong but im going off long ago memory, One other thing is interesting about Pluto is its moon Charon is almost as big as Pluto but thats not saying it is close to its size but it rains in the very large asteroid objects,

It will be interesting to see Pluto up close and personal in 2015 when new horizons will finally reach it,

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My question is if Uranus & Neptune are 'icy' planets the same as Pluto then how come they get to keep their 'planet' status but Pluto gets strip of its status??That doesn't seems very logical when you have 3 planets that do orbit the sun & are pretty close to the same make up (ie-mostly made of ice) that the nitpicking of what is a planet or not is making it much more difficult for school children to properly learn the history of our solar system....

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My question is if Uranus & Neptune are 'icy' planets the same as Pluto then how come they get to keep their 'planet' status but Pluto gets strip of its status??That doesn't seems very logical when you have 3 planets that do orbit the sun & are pretty close to the same make up (ie-mostly made of ice) that the nitpicking of what is a planet or not is making it much more difficult for school children to properly learn the history of our solar system....

Hello Kat,

Just wanted to clear up a couple points in your assertion about the three planets you describe as being the same,,

Firstly neptune and uranus are nowhere close to same type of planets as pluto, Neptune and uranus are not frozen rockey worlds, They are actually huge gas giants in which (just a guess) could hold possibly 1000 plutos inside them so they are very different worlds, Pluto is believed to be an asteriod object from the asteroid belt,

What all the fuss about with pluto is there is a specfic size that a planet has to be in order to hold full planet staus,

Hope that helped a bit, I am attaching a link so you can see all the different planets and tons of info.

Nasa's planetary photo journal

Just click on the planet you wish to learn about,

Enjoy;

TFF

Edited by thefinalfrontier
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Hello Kat,

Just wanted to clear up a couple points in your assertion about the three planets you describe as being the same,,

Firstly neptune and uranus are nowhere close to same type of planets as pluto, Neptune and uranus are not frozen rockey worlds, They are actually huge gas giants in which (just a guess) could hold possibly 1000 plutos inside them so they are very different worlds, Pluto is believed to be an asteriod object from the asteroid belt,

What all the fuss about with pluto is there is a specfic size that a planet has to be in order to hold full planet staus,

Hope that helped a bit, I am attaching a link so you can see all the different planets and tons of info.

Nasa's planetary photo journal

Just click on the planet you wish to learn about,

Enjoy;

TFF

just to clarify your clarify.

neptune and uranus are called ice gaints because it is believed that they have an icy core about the size of earth.

pluto is a kiper belt, not astroid belt object.

sedna is indead larger than pluto by about 10 miles.

dwarf planets are called that not due to their size specifecally, but due to whether they have cleared their orbits of other bodies. some now claim that jupiter, earth and saturn would fall under that classification for the same reasons.

as far as i care we now have 3 rocky planets, 1 rocky dwarf planet, 2 gas giants, 2 ice giants, and i think the number is 4 ice dwarf planets. that makes 16 total planets in our system, that is double what it was when i went to school.

that is the reason main reason for reclassifing the smaller planets as dwarves so we wouldnt have to remember them all.

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Wasnt it not long ago they found a body out there and named it Sedna? If memory serves correct that body had more mass than Pluto did, I could be wrong but im going off long ago memory, One other thing is interesting about Pluto is its moon Charon is almost as big as Pluto but thats not saying it is close to its size but it rains in the very large asteroid objects,

It will be interesting to see Pluto up close and personal in 2015 when new horizons will finally reach it,

Checking on it, Sedna is 5th. Eris was first, but now it looks like it's just behind Pluto now. Wouldn't surprise me if it ends up with more objects out there, with some bigger than Pluto, but further out.

Yeah, I'm somewhat impatiently patiently awaiting the probe's results in '15.

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some still think we will find at least one mars sized object in the oort cloud. since it hasnt cleaned its orbit, we will have to call it a dwarf planet right.

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some still think we will find at least one mars sized object in the oort cloud. since it hasnt cleaned its orbit, we will have to call it a dwarf planet right.

Plutoid, actually. Transnuptonian object. Technicalities.

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My vote... Leave it as a Dwarf Planet. Where is the line between asteroid and planet? Having a dwarf planet option makes characterizing these bodies more exact. If anything we need an new descriptor for Giant Planets.

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My vote... Leave it as a Dwarf Planet. Where is the line between asteroid and planet? Having a dwarf planet option makes characterizing these bodies more exact. If anything we need an new descriptor for Giant Planets.

this one is easy, a planet, any planet is big enough to that gravity pulls it into a sphere and it doesnt orbit anything but it's sun

Edited by danielost
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Give Pluto its due!!!

i agree, but then i remember that ceres, when first found was called a planet, then they changed it to an astroid, and now it is a dwarf planet. soit has become a planet again.

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i agree, but then i remember that ceres, when first found was called a planet, then they changed it to an astroid, and now it is a dwarf planet. soit has become a planet again.

Hello All

Maybe all this discussion in anticipation of what Pluto is or is not could be missing the point.

Check out this site http://www.spacenow.com.br/

I don't know,it sure sounds too fantastic,but they apparently discovered the means to visualize EVERYTHING in the Solar System.If Pluto has a Gigantic mountain as they show,it will surely stirr up astrophysical concepts.

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i grew up learning pluto was a planet, therefor to me it will always be one

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i grew up learning pluto was a planet, therefor to me it will always be one

the nine planets website says it doesnt matter since pluto is still there. but i agree,

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Imo pluto should have just been left as it was but it dont matter really cos pluto is still there and will be for eons to come, dwarf or full status,

Actually, in the perihelium, 4,41 Billion km, Pluto is closer to Uranus than to Neptune, which Kuiper belt object can brag about that? All the Kuiper belt objects have their whole orbit well outside the Solar system. Pluto is on the inside, for most of its orbit.

The only criteria that Pluto did not meet for being classified as a Planet, was the criteria that require a planet to have "cleared its path", meaning it is dominating its orbit with no asteroids etc in its path, which is a unfair requirement of Pluto, since its orbital time is 248 years, so a bit impatient of the assembly of astronomers.

Pluto also has an atmosphere, 99,97% Nitogene, with 300ppm CO and 15ppm methane in the part of its orbit where it is closer to our Sun, no Kuiper belt object have that.

Pluto has a 17 degree angle to the eliptical plane, which has been used against Pluto, but its average distance to our Sun is 5,9 Billion km. Mercury has a 7 degree angle, but it is is just 58 Million km away.

I am happy to see many of us think it was unecessary of the assembly of astronomers to do this, nice to see that many of us think of Pluto as a part of our planet system.

Cheers, Nordmann61 :).

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