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H.H. Holmes

ADD/ADHD

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H.H. Holmes

I recently searched the forums for an ADD/ADHD topic and, to my surprise, there was none.

I have been diagnosed with ADD (just recently rediagnosed as ADHD, since the doctors think my major depression has dampered the hyperactivity aspect) by several doctors since the third grade. I was ALWAYS getting in trouble for blirting out totally inappropriate comments that had nothing to do with the subject at hand. For instance, in the third grade I had just gotten back from a trip to the Camen (sp?) Islands and my teacher was talking about some short story we were reading. Well, I was off in la-la land, so I raised my hand and informed the class that it was illegal to kill turtles there. My teacher got p***ed, she was obviously annoyed that I would bring something up totally unrelated to the subject at hand.

I've always felt different, I suppose, when it came to academics or regular, everyday aspects of my life. I had the will to succeed just as much as the next student, but sitting through a whole class and keeping my attention on the subject was next to impossible. I always felt "dumb" or "lazy" because I saw all of these students seemingly just cruising through class, getting their homework done in one sitting, and just having no problem in school. I wasn't stupid, but I felt that way, although I've gotten an IQ score of 136 on a school IQ test (I don't mean to toot my own horn, but toot toot... ;)). Keeping any type of schedule is almost impossible, also, my days are erratic at best. I don't know what I will be interested in from day to day or minute to minute. I've gotten into so many things that it's hard to count. Most were impulsive and grandiose, but I never could stick to any one thing.

It's literally like you can't control your own mind; you are just along for the ride. Brain scans and solid, clinical observation has proven that ADHD is a neurological condition. My link Medication increases the levels of dopamine and norepinephrine that the brain produces, which is what is thought that those who have ADD/ADHD lack. So many people are told that they are "lazy" or "unmotivated" and it can have enormous impact on one's self-esteem. They just can't control it because of their brain chemistry. Medication and behavioral training can help one live with the condition.

So does anyone else suffer from this condition.

Edited by H.H. Holmes

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Disembodied Voice

So does anyone else suffer from this condition.

I do. And I hate it, it is very frustrating. I know what you're going through. I have yet to find a medication that helps. I drink energy shots to help me focus....helps a very little bit but not as much as I wish it would.

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H.H. Holmes

I do. And I hate it, it is very frustrating. I know what you're going through. I have yet to find a medication that helps. I drink energy shots to help me focus....helps a very little bit but not as much as I wish it would.

Thanks for the reply, it seems that not many people are interested in this topic, although I believe it is a fascinating one.

I think that many people believe that we have character defects or we just don't try hard enough, which is a shame because it has a negative effect on self-esteem. Those people don't understand that our brains have to work much harder to get the same academic tasks done than other people. Outside of academics and work, however, our ADD/ADHD can have a positive affect on other areas of our lives. People with the condition seem to be much more creative than those without the disorder. We always want to move on to the next "thing" or explore new areas of interest; ADDers are never stagnant, we are always looking for that next horizon. That is where the boredom comes in, ADDers get bored with tasks much more quickly than a normal person. I suppose that evolutionarily our propensity for exploration would of been of benefit to us, since noone ever got anywhere without a little bit of risk taking. ADDers were the ones who would go out farther to find a new food source or to find the best watering hole. The condition is not a "defect" it obviously had some evolutionary advantages, or it would not be as prevalent as it is.

Here is a good link that details some of the more positive aspects of having ADD/ADHD. My link

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Harakuro

I have a lot of friends who have ADHD, one in particular i enjoyed being around. Brilliant man to be honest.

Of course he had meds for them, ritalin i think it was. When he was on them, he would be calm serious, and focussed. In Physic's class he would correct the teacher/ argue with the teacher and win. When he was off, silly guy, just goofing around being very hyper, acting all stupid. Anyways, believe it or not, this guy is in university studing to be a brain surgent.

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ShadowSot

Eh, I've always supposed if I were to be checked I'd be diagnosed as so.

Sometimes, I really consider getting checked, but forget.

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Princess Serenity

I think I had it when I was younger. I don't know but I have a hard time with numbers. Math wasn't the best of the subject. I always had a problem with paying attention. My mind always wondered off but I always kept my grades up. =/ *Shrugs*

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H.H. Holmes

I think I had it when I was younger. I don't know but I have a hard time with numbers. Math wasn't the best of the subject. I always had a problem with paying attention. My mind always wondered off but I always kept my grades up. =/ *Shrugs*

ADD/ADHD doesn't really go away, since it is a permanent condition. Perhaps, you developed coping mechanisms to deal with it better later on in life. I will say that just because you had trouble paying attention doesn't mean that you have ADD/ADHD. There are a number of symptoms that must be exhibited other than trouble paying attention, I would suggest looking at some of the symptoms listed below to decide whether or not it is likely that you have ADD/ADHD.

Often making careless mistakes when having to work on uninteresting or difficult projects

Often having difficulty keeping attention during work, or holding down a job for a significant amount of time

Often having difficulty concentrating on conversations

Having trouble finishing projects that have already been started

Often having difficulty organizing for the completion of tasks

Avoiding or delaying in starting projects that require a lot of thought

Often misplacing or having difficulty finding things at home or at work

Disorganized personal items (sometimes old and useless to the individual) causing excessive "clutter" (in the home, car, etc.)

Often distracted by activity or noise

Often having problems remembering appointments or obligations, or inconveniently changing plans on a regular basis

My link

I would also like to say that you should never self-diagnose; always seek out a professional opinion from a certified psychologist/psychiatrist before you go on assuming that you have a condition, whether it be ADD/ADHD or any other illness.

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Princess Serenity

ADD/ADHD doesn't really go away, since it is a permanent condition. Perhaps, you developed coping mechanisms to deal with it better later on in life. I will say that just because you had trouble paying attention doesn't mean that you have ADD/ADHD. There are a number of symptoms that must be exhibited other than trouble paying attention, I would suggest looking at some of the symptoms listed below to decide whether or not it is likely that you have ADD/ADHD.

My link

I would also like to say that you should never self-diagnose; always seek out a professional opinion from a certified psychologist/psychiatrist before you go on assuming that you have a condition, whether it be ADD/ADHD or any other illness.

Thanks for that. I did have difficultys. But I'm not sure. I just heard my mom say that one day. *Shrugs*

I didn't self-diagonsed. Like I said above I heard my mom say that one day when I was young. Also the list sorta sounds like me.

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pickletoes

I have ADD I think, never been diagnosed but several of my friends are Special Education teachers. It is harder than most people realize. I lose things constantly, keys, phones, credit cards. I actually have to have a few pints of beer if I need to do something that requires focus because I do exactly what you say. I go off the rails. For some reason this helps. Can't really recommend it though as I've probably given myself a drinking problem in the process. I thought about going on some sort of drug but I tried a few for anxiety and it just turns me into "not me." Good luck to you and don't feel bad. It's a medical condition, not a form of failure. B) B)

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H.H. Holmes

I have ADD I think, never been diagnosed but several of my friends are Special Education teachers. It is harder than most people realize. I lose things constantly, keys, phones, credit cards. I actually have to have a few pints of beer if I need to do something that requires focus because I do exactly what you say. I go off the rails. For some reason this helps. Can't really recommend it though as I've probably given myself a drinking problem in the process. I thought about going on some sort of drug but I tried a few for anxiety and it just turns me into "not me." Good luck to you and don't feel bad. It's a medical condition, not a form of failure. B) B)

Well, you are not alone with the drug use issue, many people who ADD/ADHD tend to self-medicate with drugs or alcohol. On average, they have more issues with problems like anxiety, depression, and other related mental health conditions.

I totally understand how you feel. I don't want to get into medications and so forth, since I'm not a qualified person to do so; however, I will tell you that there is help out there, even for adults who have never been diagnosed. The medication has really helped me with alot of the forgetfulness, fidgeting, short attention, and poor organizational skills. The meds seem to calm me down, so that I can direct my attention at the things that I really care about.

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