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In 10 years we discover 250,000 new species


Big Bad Voodoo

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"In the last decade, scientists and explorers have discovered a quarter of a million new plant and animal species around the world. In a celebratory special programme, presenter Chris Packham chooses his top 10 most extraordinary discoveries of the past 10 years. Here is a selection"

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2010/dec/13/bbc-decade-of-discovery#/?picture=369574867&index=8

FOR ADMIN: Please can you correct my title. "discover" Thanks.

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FOR ADMIN: Please can you correct my title. "discover" Thanks.

No problem, fixed. :)

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No problem, fixed. :)

Thank you Saru. On topic: This fish is no comment. This thread should be in Bizzar.

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I think that would be cool to have one transparent fish in home aquarium. Who doesnt want fish for pet?

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200px-Colossal_octopus_by_Pierre_Denys_de_Montfort.jpg

The colossal squid was considered a myth, but discovered to be real, so I wonder if gigantic octopi will be discovered anytime soon!

In 1802, the French malacologist Pierre Denys de Montfort in Histoire Naturelle Générale et Particulière des Mollusques, an encyclopedic description of mollusks, recognized the existence of two kinds of giant octopus. One being the kraken octopus, which Denys de Montfort believed had been described not only by Norwegian sailors and American whalers, but also by ancient writers such as Pliny the Elder. The second one being the much larger colossal octopus (the one actually depicted by the image) which reportedly attacked a sailing vessel from Saint-Malo off the coast of Angola.

A gigantic octopus has been proposed as an identity for the large carcass, known as the St. Augustine Monster, that washed up in St Augustine, Florida in 1896. However, samples of this specimen subjected to electron microscopy and biochemical analysis were found to be "masses of virtually pure collagen" and not to have the "biochemical characteristics of invertebrate collagen, nor the collagen fiber arrangement of octopus mantle". The results suggest the samples are "large pieces of vertebrate skin ... from a huge homeotherm".

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  • 4 weeks later...

I think that would be cool to have one transparent fish in home aquarium. Who doesnt want fish for pet?

Nah, such aquarium would cost too much. It’s a deep sea creature that needs the pressure far greater than we have here on surface.

Every 10 metres of depth adds 1 bar, so in moderate depths like 500 metres (0,5 km) you already have 50 bars. The pressure in car tyres is usually around 2 bars, just to illustrate what kind of crushing pressure we’re talking about.

But the fish is cool. Reminds me of my boss.

And... hey, Chronii, I'm too lazy to search for photos right now, but sometimes squid of respectable size get washed out on beaches. If a squid can grow to the smaller boat size, I'm quite sure octopus that we are yet to see might as well be as huge as the one in the picture your posted. After all, all those stories about giant octopuses probably are exaggerated to some extent, but must have had real encounters behind them.

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