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ohio state buckeyes

Dead birds keep falling from the sky

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conspiracybeliever

Fish also dead in AR

(RNN) - As if 5,000 dead blackbirds weren't enough to concern Arkansas residents, about 100,000 dead drum fish have washed up along the Arkansas River.

Keith Stevens, assistant chief of communications for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AGFC), said a tugboat operator reported seeing the fish as he was going up river on Dec. 30. About 15 biologists descended on the area the next day to investigate.

Scientists think the fish kill was probably caused by a disease passed among the fish – and not by outside contamination – because the vast majority of dead fish are of the same species.

"If it would have been something like that … It would have dissipated pretty quickly and it would have killed all the fish," Stevens said.

Specimens were sent to the University of Arkansas for testing, and results will be released in the next few weeks.

These back-to-back incidents have left Arkansans concerned. Little Rock resident Kathryn Medlock said she hopes the tests show that the wildlife deaths are coincidental, and not part of a larger environmental

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Vi0linist

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Helen of Annoy

Thanks, but it redirects me to the exact same URL I posted earlier. :wacko: I hope other people can see it.

Well... takes me to a different story, but still not close to Louisiana birds :lol:

Never mind that, could be my browser behaving, not important.

This is so horrible... if fish and bird deaths are connected, then it sounds like some poison to me? That kills instantly and gets dissolved really fast? Like something was dumped in the river, killed the fish, was released into the air out of the water (or chemical that reacted with water) and then killed the birds.

Bird deaths alone could be from explosion in the air... maybe. Anyway, it's very creepy.

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Vi0linist

Well... takes me to a different story, but still not close to Louisiana birds :lol:

Never mind that, could be my browser behaving, not important.

This is so horrible... if fish and bird deaths are connected, then it sounds like some poison to me? That kills instantly and gets dissolved really fast? Like something was dumped in the river, killed the fish, was released into the air out of the water (or chemical that reacted with water) and then killed the birds.

Bird deaths alone could be from explosion in the air... maybe. Anyway, it's very creepy.

It might be CNN's problem. But that's nothing new. :rolleyes:

It IS creepy, though. The Louisiana birds have no signs of trauma, unlike the Arkansas birds (so far, at least). I think the species are similar in both cases, as well.

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Vi0linist

Dead Birds in Louisiana

300 miles, days later. Still fireworks?

Fireworks that can travel 300 miles over a couple of days. . . Fireworks regulations are really lax, nowadays. :yes:

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Malaria_Kidd

The typical scientist would mention fireworks. Where is the other scientists on this. Then it would be dumb and dumbers! One loud flash/bang and the oncoming flock would leave the area PDQ.

Louisiana too? Alex Jones mentioned ducks, starlings and red-winged blackbirds last night on Coast to Coast AM. Lots of theories were bantered about with George Noory and Nick Begich! Did anyone hear that the first hour or hear about ducks in the count?

Edited by Malaria_Kidd

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her.
The Louisiana birds have no signs of trauma, unlike the Arkansas birds (so far, at least). I think the species are similar in both cases, as well.

both cases involve red-winged blackbirds.

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txdave37

both cases involve red-winged blackbirds.

For what it is worth, I live in Central Ar, and the local news radar showed that the storms had moved completely out of Beebee by 11pm that night. Unless a tornado caught these birds and kept them up in the air for an hour, the weather explanation doesn't fit.

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kelunexplained

Yep Louisiana too. Apparently they were starlings and blackbirds. I just don't believe the fireworks theory, it sounds ridiculous. My town has fireworks on the 4th, and no birds ever die around here from fireworks.

It sounds like a virus, kinda like the White Nose Virus thing that is happening with Bats. They showed the birds getting lethargic and then dying, so it looks like a virus. I think the fish incident just so happened around the same time, and was a coincidence.

Don't know if anyone heard this, but a lady in Kentucky reported dead birds in her yard as well.

Edited by kelunexplained

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her.

For what it is worth, I live in Central Ar

so do i. ;)

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Vi0linist

Don't know if anyone heard this, but a lady in Kentucky reported dead birds in her yard as well.

This was recent?! Ew, this is getting really creepy and close to home. . .I'll be looking out for any Ohio occurrences.

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kelunexplained

The place I read it, made it seem like it was recent. Maybe it actually wasn't recent? I don't know.

I read dead fish washed up in Brazil too, maybe someone already mentioned that. Also, along some other coasts.

I hope they figure it out, because this doesn't sound good for the environment, and possibly humans.

Edited by kelunexplained

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Big Bad Voodoo

I dont believe that firework cause shock to birds. Then in whole world we would have dead birds. Bunch of bull theory.

Something is hiding here.

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Sakari

The place I read it, made it seem like it was recent. Maybe it actually wasn't recent? I don't know.

I read dead fish washed up in Brazil too, maybe someone already mentioned that. Also, along some other coasts.

I hope they figure it out, because this doesn't sound good for the environment, and possibly humans.

As I have stated numerous times now , these things are not that un common...Especially the fish !

But hey , I found a nice post ( that I am so far from agreeing with ) on another site that I will share here to add fuel to the " doomsday " theory.

Birds are very sensitive to electrostatic charges. A simple thunder cloud will irritate a bird severley. This is why birds fly low to the ground just before a storm, to avoid the very uncomfortable charges in the air.

In Arkansas there is one of the Worlds Largest Quartz deposits underground. Quartz is piezoelectric which means a charge developes over the surface of the quartz when pressure is applied to the crystal. The charge is millions of volts but it happens so fast its nearly harmless to people on a small scale. This is how some lighters work. A hammer hits a quartz device releasing a spark.

Anyways, the recent earthquake has placed new pressures on the quartz deposits in Arkansas. This results in a massive discharge of billions of volts of electricity. Think how a small piece of quartz the size of a pea can light a lighter. Now think about millions of Tons of quartz discharging under the extreme pressures the Earth can push.

At some point, the charges below created a brief surface charge, positive charge, during a discharge event. The electrostatic charge is immense and knocks the birds out cold in flight. The birds are still alive though, just knocked unconscious. The birds that were flying high were the ones killed upon impact. Blunt force trauma. The birds that were in the trees survived. Some birds like to fly high, others fly low. This explains why it was species specific as the birds that flew high were the ones to die.

Even American Indians knew the area in Arkansas to have very spiritual properties. Unknown but due to the massive quartz deposits below.

Now, there is a huge amount of pressure shifting below Arkansas. It is not uncommon to find mass animal death just before a large earthquake.....And the New Madrid Fault is due, over due infact.

I highly suggest anyone near the New Madrid Fault to store water and non perishables for a few weeks. The standard prep kit.

http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message1308200/pg1

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kelunexplained

It doesn't matter how common it is. It would be better if it stopped happening, and find out if it's something in the environment. Obviously with the fish it is. We can't have dead fish washing ashore everywhere.

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Sakari

It doesn't matter how common it is. It would be better if it stopped happening, and find out if it's something in the environment. Obviously with the fish it is. We can't have dead fish washing ashore everywhere.

With the fish , that can happen from sudden changes in the water temperature....Each species can tolerate different things , hence one species dying more than another....There were storms that came through , and drastic changes in the water temperatures.

We can't stop Mother Nature :)

Also , if a species numbers get to high , there can be mass die offs.....Again , can't stop Mother Nature.

If it were a Poison or Toxin in the water EVERY species of fish there would have died , not a large number of one species , so no , it is not anything man made.

As for the birds , getting taken up into a storm happens , not all the time , but it does....I can't keep pointing people to links every page , get's old.Either people do not want to read facts , or just simply ignore them.

As for the Earthquakes , Tornado's , I also posted on that.....

Arkansas = Tornado Alley , 19 Tornado's a year on average.

Arkansas = New Madrid Fault , 200 Earthquakes a year.

There is nothing crazy about this story.................

Below should help explain :

Fish kills come in many shapes and forms-sometimes big fish die, sometimes small fish die, other times all fish meet the same demise. Some fish kills are limited to a particularly sensitive species of fish, others do not discriminate and affect all fish (including the big game fish you keep fishing for).

A fish kill can be as small as 10-20 fish or as large as 10-20,000-and once fish begin to die, it's generally too late to remedy the situation. The only way to thwart the fish kill phenomenon is prevention. Before we can prevent fish kills, we must understand the six possible causes behind them:

1. Oxygen Depletion

Oxygen depletion is the most common cause of fish kills. Oxygen must be present in the water for fish to breathe-an oxygen level of 4-5 parts per million is recommended for healthy fish.

When oxygen levels dip down to 2-3ppm, fish become stressed. Fish swimming near the surface, sometimes gulping the air, is a common symptom of this stage.

Large fish are the first to die in an oxygen depletion fish kill, followed by the smaller fish. Fish kills of this sort often happen overnight or in the early morning-and typically occur in a matter of hours.

2. Large Plant or Algae Die-Off

When a body of water rife with plants and algae suddenly receives less sunlight or receives algaecides and herbicides, large die-offs can occur. The resulting decaying matter wicks oxygen out of the water, suffocating your fish.

As a rule of thumb, if your pond has more than a 20% covering of algae or surface plants, avoid algaecides and herbicides and get oxygen into the water as quickly as possible (see solutions).

3. Turnover

Stagnant water tends to migrate into distinct layers-like a layer cake. Fish typically reside in the layers near the surface where they enjoy warmer water and higher dissolved oxygen.

The layer at the bottom is like a fish no-man's-land as it is generally is colder, has little or no oxygen, and is filled with accumulating toxic gasses that are trapped by the layer differences.

In the spring and fall (and sometimes more often if the weather conditions are just right) these layers mix, sucking all the oxygen out of the water and introducing toxic gasses to the fish. If severe enough, turnover can easily cause a mass fish kill.

4. Surface Freeze

When the surface freezes, the ice acts just like the temperature difference mentioned in #3. Gasses poisonous to the fish build up, and can sometimes wipe out entire populations.

5. Toxins and Chemicals

If pesticides or other harmful chemicals run into your pond, it can obviously have a damaging affect on any life within it.

Sometimes the application of herbicides or algaecides can lead to fish kills, as the chemicals is lethal to all sorts of aquatic life.

6. Disease

Disease affects all life forms at some point or another, and it's hard to prevent. The symptoms of disease, however, are often less severe than most fish kills and happen gradually over time (rather than over the course of a few hours, like a normal fish kill).

Disease generally affects only one species of fish, seldom killing all of them, and rarely do they occur on a mass fish-kill scale.

http://ezinearticles...tion&id=2493918

edit 2 : above would also be the same in lakes and rivers.

edit 3 : I feel the more information I can give ( if read ) would help people understand that this is not strange at all.......

Dead and dying fish are an ugly sight. Truth is, most species of fish are relatively short-lived and have a high rate of mortality. Even large fish, too large to be eaten by predators such as bass and pike, experience a death rate of approximately 50% per year. Fortunately, the deaths are usually spread-out over the year and are rarely observed or become a problem except when concentrated as a "fish kill". The condition called "fish kill" occurs when a number of fish in a given body of water die from a specific cause. Most of the time, fish kills are due to natural causes over which we have no control, such as weather. Only occasionally is death directly related to pollution or improper use of herbicides or other chemicals. Only a fraction of the dead fish are ever observed because many decompose on the bottom or are eaten by scavengers such as turtles and crayfish. Natural fish kills are of three basic seasonal types:

  • WINTER KILL, which occurs in late winter but may not be seen until early spring.
  • SPRING KILL, which is occurs in late May to early June
  • SUMMER KILL, which occurs on the hottest days of mid summer.

WINTER KILL

Winter kill is the most common type of fish kill. When severe, it has devastating effects on fish populations and fishing quality. Winter kill occurs during especially long, harsh winters. Shallow lakes with excess amounts of aquatic vegetation and mucky bottoms are prone to this problem. The results of a winter kill are seldom noticed until spring when the ice melts. Then the dead fish, often the larger ones, are seen washing up along the edge. Because they require more oxygen, the large fish suffocate and die first. Winter kill begins with distressed fish gasping for air at holes in the ice and ends with large numbers of dead fish which bloat as the water warms in early spring. Dead fish may appear fuzzy because of secondary infection by fungus, but the fungus was not the cause of death.

Actually, the fish suffocated from lack of dissolved oxygen. Trace amounts of dissolved oxygen (measured in parts per million, ppm) are required by fish and all other forms of aquatic life. Even living plants and the bacteria that decompose organic materials on the bottom of the lake require oxygen. As a rule of thumb, the critical level of oxygen is about 2 ppm for most game fish native to warmwater lakes, and levels below 1 ppm for extended periods of time are lethal.

But species of fish vary in their tolerance of low oxygen. Trout are most sensitive; walleye, bass, and bluegill have intermediate sensitivity; and northern pike, yellow perch, and pumpkinseed are relatively tolerant. Bullheads and certain minnows are very tolerant. Lakes prone to periodic winterkill can often be detected from the composition of their fish populations - tolerant species predominate, sensitive species are rare, and prey greatly outnumber predators. Fortunately, usually enough fish survive, either in the lake or in connecting waters, to repopulate the lake in a couple of years. Only for extreme die-offs is fish restocking necessary.

The dissolved oxygen content of water depends primarily on three variables. These are the amount of mixing with the air above the lake, the rate of oxygen production by plants, and the rate of oxygen consumption (respiration) by living aquatic organisms. During periods of prolonged ice cover, the lake is sealed off from the atmosphere and cannot be recharged with oxygenated air. Furthermore, ice and snow reduce the amount of sunlight reaching aquatic plants, thereby reducing photosynthesis and oxygen production. (During photosynthesis, living plants use sunlight energy and carbon dioxide to make plant tissue and dissolved oxygen). Meanwhile, on-going consumption of oxygen depletes the supply of oxygen stored in the lake when the lake froze over. Shallow, productive lakes are at a disadvantage because they have a low storage capacity and high rates of oxygen-consuming decomposition.

In northern NY, January is usually a critical period and is the best time to check the oxygen content of lakes prone to winterkill. A good midwinter thaw about then often recharges the lake's oxygen supply by means of photosynthesis and melt water. Conversely, a prolonged winter, with continuous snow cover and late ice-out, increases the chance of winterkill.

The only long-term solution for winterkill lakes is to reverse the natural process of filling and enrichment (eutrophication). Dredging or sucking bottom sediments can increase the volume of water, reduce the nutrient-rich sediment, and reduce the growth of nuisance plants. However, such projects are extremely costly, require a site for disposing of the bottom material, and may require a permit. Lake residents can help slow down the rate of eutrophication by keeping all types of plant fertilizers out of the lake.

http://www.blacklakeny.com/article1a6a.html

Edited by Sakari

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farandaway

Oh!, I get it now. :blush::lol:

You guys are lucky, it's below freezing here. <_<

Edit: Was below freezing, it jumped up to 35 in the last 10 minutes. You aren't the only one with strange weather. Actually living here (in Oregon) I have seen sunshine, rain, snow, hail, fog and back to sunshine over the span of 2 hours. Hows that for insane? ^_^

Ahh! Oregon weather...My Niece's husband used to used to tell me if I didn't like the weather "give it a few minutes, it'll change." Very true. I lived in So. Oregon for about five years and miss it terribly.

"The birds obviously hit something very hard and had hemorrhages," game-and-fish commission bird expert Karen Rowe told CNN.

It's unknown whether the trauma occurred during contact with something in the sky—such as lightning or high-altitude hail—or when the birds hit the ground, Rowe said.

My link

Couldn't sudden updrafts cause a flock of birds to fly into each other, creating trauma?

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Sakari

Ahh! Oregon weather...My Niece's husband used to used to tell me if I didn't like the weather "give it a few minutes, it'll change." Very true. I lived in So. Oregon for about five years and miss it terribly.

Couldn't sudden updrafts cause a flock of birds to fly into each other, creating trauma?

What part of Oregon?..I'm in Langlois , smack in the middle of Bandon and Port Orford :)

Yes on your question , go back and read some of the links I posted. :)

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farandaway

What part of Oregon?..I'm in Langlois , smack in the middle of Bandon and Port Orford :)

Yes on your question , go back and read some of the links I posted. :)

Medford, we be city folk. I see you're out in BFE. LOL. My Niece is in Rogue River. I had to move to Sacramento for financial reasons (no jobs), my son is still there though, so I'm hoping to move back.

I don't know why people see these instances as conspiracies or paranormal phenomena, have they ever met Mother Nature and seen what she's capable of? Strange natural phenomena is a way of life on this dirty blue marble.;)

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Sakari

Medford, we be city folk. I see you're out in BFE. LOL. My Niece is in Rogue River. I had to move to Sacramento for financial reasons (no jobs), my son is still there though, so I'm hoping to move back.

I don't know why people see these instances as conspiracies or paranormal phenomena, have they ever met Mother Nature and seen what she's capable of? Strange natural phenomena is a way of life on this dirty blue marble.;)

I dont want to bury the information I posted ( back 3 replies or so for those to read again please ) :yes:

Rogue River is awesome !

We lived in Sparks,Nevada ( Reno , same difference ) , moved here for financial reasons also . ( Bridge Work Job )...Love it here , but finding this decision may have been a bad one....Live by mistakes I guess.

I think it is just that some people like to think there is something else out there that is more " fantasy " like , and just sounds so much more interesting then the real logical answers.....I try to keep feeding facts , and hopefully maybe one person will see them. :tu:

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farandaway

Rogue River is awesome !

We lived in Sparks,Nevada ( Reno , same difference ) , moved here for financial reasons also . ( Bridge Work Job )...Love it here , but finding this decision may have been a bad one....Live by mistakes I guess.

Rogue River Rooster Crow! Love Nevada, wanted to move to Carson City, my brother lived there, wasn't practical though.

I believe in the paranormal and supernatural, but I'm just too old and jaded to believe that there are not rational explanations for most of the weird things that happen in this life. Besides, some of the real, logical answers are pretty fantastic in themselves!;)

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ohio state buckeyes

It seems the fireworks is the easiest theory to give and hope people just let this drop.

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Benz
The second unexplained mass bird death within a week has been discovered in the southern United States, this time in the state of Louisiana, officials said Tuesday.

The latest incident affected some 500 birds which were discovered dead in Pointe Coupee Parish, said Olivia Watkins of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Watkins said an investigation was underway into the cause of the deaths, which occurred just a few days after thousands of birds were discovered dead in neighbouring Arkansas.

"We sent samples to a lab in Missouri and are waiting to get some results," she said.

Nancy Ledbetter at the Arkansas Game & Fish Commission said officials in that state were awaiting test results to find the cause of death of as many as 5000 blackbirds in the small town of Beebe as well as deaths of 80,000 to 100,000 fish found floating in the Arkansas River about 160km away.

"We still don't believe the (fish and bird deaths) are related," she said.

As to the incident in Louisiana, she said "We don't expect that to be related either."

Officials said earlier that some type of disturbance — possibly fireworks on New Year's Eve — might have provoked the birds to take flight in the dark. Because blackbirds have poor night vision they may have died after bumping into houses, trees and other birds in their fright.

Arkansas officials said preliminary testing showed no signs of disease in the dead birds and that they died of "acute physical trauma.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/world/8192044/more-dead-birds-fall-from-the-sky

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