Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Stonecoldvampzy

48 predator animals escape in Ohio

70 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

woopypooky

imagine if u are a cop there, what u will do?

shooting dead 18 bengal tigers are easier to explain than having 1 kid mauled to death.

if 1 kid is injured, people will say u are not doing ur job properly. But if 18 tigers are dead, then u are doing ur job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
__Kratos__

Actually from what I've read and seen, the animals were all taken care of quite well. The guy who killed himself was known as a good man and had many friends who still stand up for him.

Jack Hanna said that the police did the right thing. I'm not sure if that is true. Did they shoot any camels or a Giraffe? If so then we would know they were just trigger happy.

Exotic animal owner Terry Thompson had a history of neglecting his animals, says an animal welfare official.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2011/1020/Exotic-animal-owner-in-Zaneville-Ohio-accused-of-neglect

Jack Hanna lost his credibility to me when he defended sea world abusing it's animals.

It's hard to say without living there and having kids who live there.

Lock the place down and tell people to stay inside. If any one of these hicks had ever even read or watched national geographic they would have known how badly endangered the tigers were.

imagine if u are a cop there, what u will do?

shooting dead 18 bengal tigers are easier to explain than having 1 kid mauled to death.

if 1 kid is injured, people will say u are not doing ur job properly. But if 18 tigers are dead, then u are doing ur job.

Well humans aren't that high on my list of cares but against an endangered species that I've loved since childhood... I doubt very much I would have went out sport shooting innocents.

Again... 1400 tigers worldwide on the brink of being wiped out but we have nearing 7 billion humans. We should do more to help an endangered animal that is only such because of our own hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SilverCougar

Sadly Kro... even if they knew, they wouldn't give a damn. Humans will always have the "Them or me" mentality. Meaning no matter how endangered the animal.. if it even has a "hint" of posing a threat, the first thing done is kill it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myles

Exotic animal owner Terry Thompson had a history of neglecting his animals, says an animal welfare official.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2011/1020/Exotic-animal-owner-in-Zaneville-Ohio-accused-of-neglect

Jack Hanna lost his credibility to me when he defended sea world abusing it's animals.

Lock the place down and tell people to stay inside. If any one of these hicks had ever even read or watched national geographic they would have known how badly endangered the tigers were.

Well humans aren't that high on my list of cares but against an endangered species that I've loved since childhood... I doubt very much I would have went out sport shooting innocents.

Again... 1400 tigers worldwide on the brink of being wiped out but we have nearing 7 billion humans. We should do more to help an endangered animal that is only such because of our own hands.

So you value a tigers life over a childs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lucky7

This whole thing makes me sick. This was senseless killing of endangered animals. Surely... the man that was keeping these animals must have had dart guns stowed away. There is always another option available, but there were not two brains cells to rub together when the police arrived and started shooting. One day it will be the last lion and the last tiger... and one of these guys will show up and shoot it. Ignorance abounds and these men need educating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myles

This whole thing makes me sick. This was senseless killing of endangered animals. Surely... the man that was keeping these animals must have had dart guns stowed away. There is always another option available, but there were not two brains cells to rub together when the police arrived and started shooting. One day it will be the last lion and the last tiger... and one of these guys will show up and shoot it. Ignorance abounds and these men need educating.

You are jumping to conclusions without knowing the facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Corp

Very sad that the animals had to die, but the lives of the people in the community are more important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissMelsWell

Very sad that the animals had to die, but the lives of the people in the community are more important.

Occasionally, because I live in the wild northwest lol, we will get a wild dangerous animal loose in the burbs or in the city even (there was a black bear roaming downtown Seattle last year) its HUGE news. They send animal control out looking for the critters, they are armed with dart guns but occasionally, they do have to put an animal down. Saddly, that often happens when police find the animal in a populated area before animal control does. They have no other option, dart guns are not standard issue. The public doesn't like it, the police don't like it, animal control doesn't like it either, but it's what has to happen to keep people safe.

I don't like the violence that transpired in Ohio, not at all. BUT on the other hand, it's dark, there are 50 wild dangerous possibly hungry animals roaming around, the police are not equiped with dart guns, and even if they are, drugged, wounded and angry tigers are not something you want to chase after in the dark, in the burbs. That's a nightmare. If ONE person had been hurt or killed, we'd all be wondering how they could have been so irresponsible as to not have taken the appropriate actions, which would have been to shut them down immediately. You know what makes the whole situation even worse? These animals were twice as dangerous, they aren't particularly afraid of humans as truly wild animals would be.

As it stands, animal control and police and the public would rather the animals be taken alive, but the logistics of doing so in this case made that impossible. Not enough tranqs, too little light, too few personell trained to handle such a massive task, not enough equipment to contain the animals after they'd been tranq'd and no time to draft a plan of action.

What should have been done? That's easy. This guy should have had those animals removed from his possession LONG ago. All last year he was in prison for a weapons violation. His animals should have been safely dealt with at that time. This whole mess is really the state of Ohio's screw up.

As much as I hate what went on out there... I totally agree with you Corp. I know the animals are innocents, but so were the towns people.

Edited by MissMelsWell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
__Kratos__

Sadly Kro... even if they knew, they wouldn't give a damn. Humans will always have the "Them or me" mentality. Meaning no matter how endangered the animal.. if it even has a "hint" of posing a threat, the first thing done is kill it.

Probably. =/ I just don't see how they thought confused and wandering animals were such a threat besides the fact they were exotic... Ignorance at it's best and the end result is a pile of corpses as usual.

So you value a tigers life over a childs?

Yes.

7 billion / 1400 = 5 million humans for every tiger.

So unless that one tiger was going to kill 5 million and one humans it was more worthwhile to capture them I think. But they killed 18 of the poor things... 18 x 5m = 90m humans. So unless those tigers were going to wipe out near a quarter of the US population by wandering in the woods and countryside...

Plus there's nothing to say that people would have been killed. Keep the local area locked down till it's over.

Tigers are hardly the only species in the world today being crushed by humanity's ever expanding population.

Edited by __Kratos__

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissMelsWell

Probably. =/ I just don't see how they thought confused and wandering animals were such a threat besides the fact they were exotic... Ignorance at it's best and the end result is a pile of corpses as usual.

Yes.

7 billion / 1400 = 5 million humans for every tiger.

So unless that one tiger was going to kill 5 million and one humans it was more worthwhile to capture them I think. But they killed 18 of the poor things... 18 x 5m = 90m humans. So unless those tigers were going to wipe out near a quarter of the US population by wandering in the woods and countryside...

Plus there's nothing to say that people would have been killed. Keep the local area locked down till it's over.

Tigers are hardly the only species in the world today being crushed by humanity's ever expanding population.

And how would you have proposed, on such short emergency notice, to keep people on lock down? Several square miles or more. It's MUCH harder to do than it sounds. What do you do with all those people trapped in banks, or Walmart, or other inconvenient places? Keep them there for several days without possibly the proper sanitation, food, water, etc... How do you propose to train Police in hunting wild animals with dart guns? how long do you think it would take to bring in experienced people to do it? The longer you wait to do something, the further the animals range from a controlled area. Some wildcats can run up to 60mph, they can run a very long distance in a very short period of time. Where do you find that many cages to trap the animals once they're under? Where do you come up with modestly 5-8 vetrenarians who know anything about wild cats and bears to take care of those animals once they come out of their stupor? All these things take precious time, people and resources, that this town didn't have immediate access to. That's just how it is.

And, on such short notice, in clearly what is an emergency situtation, how would you propose to get at minimum, let's pick a conservative arbitrary number, 12-15 tranq guns and enough darts to go around? These things don't grow on trees ya know. The logistics are crazy tough to work out. It's not like you can pick up a tranq gun and darts powerful enough to take down a bear or cat at Target.

I simply don't see an alternative for what they eventually had to do. It's sad, heartbreaking and tragic. But while you might hate the human race, you are in the minority. Most of us love our family, friends, and children and don't wish to see them mauled to death in a horrible lion or bear attack all because some guy is an azzhole.

Edited by MissMelsWell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
__Kratos__

Emergency broadcast channel... Set off the tornado siren and had the cops go around town instead of going on safari.

That's no true, they had someone out there with a dart gun. The cops claimed the tiger charged them before the drug went into effect so they shot it up. I don't know their supplies or traps but they were able to catch others and they had a dart gun at least but instead they choose to shoot as many as humanly possible instead of try to help them. Plus there were traps apparently that's how they caught a few. Just seems a bit odd that they "had" to massacre over 90% of the animals.

Like Jack Hanna was saying on one of the news shows that they didn't know the weights or how much they've eaten so not even try to dart them even though they had the supplies? :blink: So it sounds like the cops pushed them out and went nuts.

During the height of the confusion, Lutz said, it was unclear how many animals had been killed. "When they're shooting animals in all directions," he said, "it's hard to keep track."

Most were found within 500 yards of their pens.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2016552980_animals20.html

Yeah but they're all "aggressive" and "dangerous" just cause they look scary and the rednecks want to shoot something. Could have just thrown down some food and they probably wouldn't have gone far anyways since they were accustom to humans.

I hate ignorance and while you just love your family, I love our other animal brothers and sisters to. I'm not some heartless monster that just goes around shooting animals standing around their pens for the lulz of it.

And again, there was no immediate danger to any of the public. It was only the cops who were stupid enough to drive up to the animals is when the animals got afraid. Now if there was a kid in the jaws of a tiger, then I could see shooting it but shooting dozens of innocent animals on the if and maybes of the world is a bit out there for me.

Using that logic, I should shoot every single person that walks past my apartment just in case they want to rob or murder me. :rolleyes:

The sheriff said that he spoke with Thompson's wife and that she was distraught over the loss of her husband and the animals. "You have to understand these animals were like kids to her," Lutz said. "She probably spent more time with these animals than some parents do spend with their kids."

Thompson's Muskingum County Animal Farm was not open to visitors, but he would occasionally take some of the smaller animals to nearby pet shows or nursing homes. He also provided a big cat for a photo shoot with supermodel Heidi Klum and appeared on the "Rachael Ray Show" in 2008 as an animal handler for a zoologist guest.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/10/21/terry-thompson-ohio-man-wild-animals_n_1023710.html

Yeah, man eating beasts! Those old people with their walkers how did they ever survive?!

Edited by __Kratos__

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissMelsWell

Funny, I was just talking to a friend on Facebook that's been a vetranary technician at a northwest zoo for over 10 years now (she has an undergraduate degree in zoology and a certification as a vetranary technician). She works with chimps, wolves, bears, and primarily big cats. She loves animals more than anyone I know. She agrees with Hanna and the sherrifs decision in this case. Typically, she would agree that if a wild animal encroaches on a populated area, that it's in everyones best interest to tranquilize the animal and relocate it. Animal control is prepared to do that. They have the equipment, manpower and training to do so. It's teams of 10-12 people against one animal. In this case, it was one dude with a dart gun, and a few untrained police officers against 50+ animals. The odds of saving the animals before they kill someone are zip. She even went as far to say that she's trained to deal with those kinds of animals, and there would have been no way in hell that she would have gone in there with those kind of odds armed with a dart gun. She believes she would have given the orders to shoot to kill as well.

I don't know if you have much experience with dealing with wild animals up close and personal. I have only a small amount of experience mostly with large parrots, ones that I raised from hatching to adulthood. Even under THOSE conditions, those birds while hand reared could be scary (although not deadly) and even hand tamed, they can be very dangerous. I had a little dumpling of a parrot, no bigger than an apple that use to wander around my livingroom during the evening hours. For no reason what-so-ever, he approached my then 8yo daughter, who was doing nothing more than laying on the sofa reading a book, and he went over and ripped a huge chunk of her cheek off her face. He'd never been aggressive before. But, I knew, and my family knew, that although he was raised in captivity for many generations, he was a wild animal. It wasnt his fault, or anyone's fault, it's just the way it was. My daughter has a scar on her face now, but it too is what it is. An unfortunate and unpredictable accident.

I can't imagine the kind of hell a wild tiger or bear could have created if the officers hadnt acted quickly.

I wish the state of Ohio hadn't waited until this situation had deteriorated to this point. They should have safely removed those animals many many years ago. That's the REAL tragedy and failure. I blame the state for not getting the situation under control a very very long time ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
F3SS

Hey it's sh!tty all those cool endangered animals had to die but imagine all the dead people and pets and livestock if they haven't. They made the right call. They had to act quick or those 48 beasts could be roaming who knows where and who knows how far and who knows in whose backyard they'd be eating your dog, your kids or your grandma? OR YOU!

Edited by Is it for real

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ChloeB

Funny, I was just talking to a friend on Facebook that's been a vetranary technician at a northwest zoo for over 10 years now (she has an undergraduate degree in zoology and a certification as a vetranary technician). She works with chimps, wolves, bears, and primarily big cats. She loves animals more than anyone I know. She agrees with Hanna and the sherrifs decision in this case. Typically, she would agree that if a wild animal encroaches on a populated area, that it's in everyones best interest to tranquilize the animal and relocate it. Animal control is prepared to do that. They have the equipment, manpower and training to do so. It's teams of 10-12 people against one animal. In this case, it was one dude with a dart gun, and a few untrained police officers against 50+ animals. The odds of saving the animals before they kill someone are zip. She even went as far to say that she's trained to deal with those kinds of animals, and there would have been no way in hell that she would have gone in there with those kind of odds armed with a dart gun. She believes she would have given the orders to shoot to kill as well.

I don't know if you have much experience with dealing with wild animals up close and personal. I have only a small amount of experience mostly with large parrots, ones that I raised from hatching to adulthood. Even under THOSE conditions, those birds while hand reared could be scary (although not deadly) and even hand tamed, they can be very dangerous. I had a little dumpling of a parrot, no bigger than an apple that use to wander around my livingroom during the evening hours. For no reason what-so-ever, he approached my then 8yo daughter, who was doing nothing more than laying on the sofa reading a book, and he went over and ripped a huge chunk of her cheek off her face. He'd never been aggressive before. But, I knew, and my family knew, that although he was raised in captivity for many generations, he was a wild animal. It wasnt his fault, or anyone's fault, it's just the way it was. My daughter has a scar on her face now, but it too is what it is. An unfortunate and unpredictable accident.

I can't imagine the kind of hell a wild tiger or bear could have created if the officers hadnt acted quickly.

I wish the state of Ohio hadn't waited until this situation had deteriorated to this point. They should have safely removed those animals many many years ago. That's the REAL tragedy and failure. I blame the state for not getting the situation under control a very very long time ago.

Every pet bird I've ever met was a mean beotchy thing.

This just hurt me so bad to hear, that picture of them all lying there, that made me cry, but I think the real tragedy is that we even allow people to own these types of animals in this country at all. There's no excuse for that. A zoo is the only place that should be allowed and even some of those can't manage it well. You get some idiot with a fascination for some animal he's seen and he's got to have him one, and they always get in over their heads, like tigers, for example, they live for 15-20 years, and how many stories do you hear about some moron that has ran on hard times and can't handle them anymore. They are a huge expense, the area required to house them is way more than most people could ever dream of affording, but we allow it and that's ridiculous.

I don't know if they had to shoot them all, every single one, but it was about dark and they would go off to areas they couldn't find them. Me, I probably would have gotten myself killed trying to catch one, but it was a hard decision, I'm sure. I saw the Jack Hanna interview, he said this day would stay will him forever, just terrible. Regardless, I hope this is a wake-up call that they really people have no business owning these animals.

Edited by ChloeB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
F3SS

Yea you're right. People definately shouldn't be able to own wild carnivores that can fit your head in their mouths. Seriously, I'm not a fan of regulations, but I'll make an exception here. If you need to own them you need to be able to afford zoo like habitats with inescapable borders, a staff and the food. Or you can't own them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vzy4kat63

PETA is going to have a field day with this.

PETA have a field day? Yeah okay they are no different then the people who killed those animals. And I think it's ridiculous how they killed them instead of trap of them properly and release them to a zoo or some kind of sanctuary for wild life...

I seen it on the news that the guy released all of the animals before committing suicide.

Edited by Vzy4kat63

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissMelsWell

Every pet bird I've ever met was a mean beotchy thing.

Yes! They certainly can be! Even when hand reared, and even when generations of them have been raised in captivity, make no mistake, they ARE wild animals (with the exception of budgies and lovebirds which are now considered "domesticated" officially and they can still be crabby if not socialized properly from a young age). I used to raise a lot of parrots for the pet and show trade. I made my buyers VERY VERY aware that they were not getting a chatty, cuddly, comical pet... they were receiving a hand socialized wild animal what WOULD absolutely, at some point, have issues with behavior and that they could be terribly unpredictible and dangerous even when they thought their bird would never hurt a flea. If you beleived that, you were fooling yourself and putting you and your friends and family in danger. I mostly gave this lecture to those buying the big powerful birds like Macaws, Cockatoos, etc... but also gave it to those who were purchasing smaller birds as well. Afterall, the worst accident I ever had with a bird was inflicted by a little Meyers Parrot. He was a squirt, not very big, but did some big damage. Even though I haven't raised birds for years (at least 10 years) I will still occasionally get an email from a former client, with an out of control, now sexually mature, large parrot. Not fun for them or the bird. But even now, even though I don't even own a parrot any longer, I am HAPPY even THRILLED to work them through the behavioral issues. I raised that bird, put it in their hands, and I feel it's still my responsibility to offer lifetime support for those owners so the animal doesn't wind up neglected or abused. That is something I could not bear.

This just hurt me so bad to hear, that picture of them all lying there, that made me cry, but I think the real tragedy is that we even allow people to own these types of animals in this country at all. There's no excuse for that. A zoo is the only place that should be allowed and even some of those can't manage it well. You get some idiot with a fascination for some animal he's seen and he's got to have him one, and they always get in over their heads, like tigers, for example, they live for 15-20 years, and how many stories do you hear about some moron that has ran on hard times and can't handle them anymore. They are a huge expense, the area required to house them is way more than most people could ever dream of affording, but we allow it and that's ridiculous.

It is ridiculous. I used to run into people at parrot shows that had zoological import licenses who imported wild endangered birds. They, were, for the most part, extremely responsible and did everything they could to boost the numbers of dwindelling populations of some species. I approve. But these people were licensed and inspected regularly because it's illegal to own exotic animals in my state unless you are licensed and regularly inspected by the USDA, Federal Wildlife Administration and the Health Department. I at one point actually considered getting a Federal Hawking license, but abandoned the project after realizing I'd have to trap my own wild hawks. LOL. I wasn't so hip on taking an adult out of the wild. I was a bird keeper, breeder and handler; not a trapper. LOL.

In my traveles among exotics, I ran into people from other states who kept wild cats, monkey's, full bred wolves, and other troublesome exotics. I'm quite certain in most cases these folks were not qualified to keep them and I always worried about it. And in fact, I always found those private owners of those kinds of exotics to be bat crap crazy... just my observation. Exotic bird owners and breeders weren't exactly sane in a lot of cases too... espcially on the show circuits. It's part of the reason I got out of showing. Those people were NUTS more often than not. Evil in the extreme cases. I got pretty jaded when it came to people who breed any kind of animal for trade or show. So much so, that I got out of it. We have ONE private zoo here in my state. They do have exotics, they are inspected by three agencies very regularly. They are responsible, respectable and haven't had an animal die in their care from neglect or lack of treatment, nor have any of their animals escaped their enclosures ever. And they and their employees have regular monthly drills to practice breakout scenarios. This is earthquake country, and they are as prepared as can be for that kind of catastrophic event. Probably just as prepared as our federally licensed zoos are.

I don't know if they had to shoot them all, every single one, but it was about dark and they would go off to areas they couldn't find them. Me, I probably would have gotten myself killed trying to catch one, but it was a hard decision, I'm sure. I saw the Jack Hanna interview, he said this day would stay will him forever, just terrible. Regardless, I hope this is a wake-up call that they really people have no business owning these animals.

I agree, my friends who works in a zoo agrees, and I think they did the only thing they could do. It totally SUCKS. It's completely heartbreaking. But I can't see in this case, how it could have been done any differently. I hate that the state and health and animal welfare agencies in Ohio let this happen It's really their fault. They are the ones to blame here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ChloeB

Yes! They certainly can be! Even when hand reared, and even when generations of them have been raised in captivity, make no mistake, they ARE wild animals (with the exception of budgies and lovebirds which are now considered "domesticated" officially and they can still be crabby if not socialized properly from a young age). I used to raise a lot of parrots for the pet and show trade. I made my buyers VERY VERY aware that they were not getting a chatty, cuddly, comical pet... they were receiving a hand socialized wild animal what WOULD absolutely, at some point, have issues with behavior and that they could be terribly unpredictible and dangerous even when they thought their bird would never hurt a flea. If you beleived that, you were fooling yourself and putting you and your friends and family in danger. I mostly gave this lecture to those buying the big powerful birds like Macaws, Cockatoos, etc... but also gave it to those who were purchasing smaller birds as well. Afterall, the worst accident I ever had with a bird was inflicted by a little Meyers Parrot. He was a squirt, not very big, but did some big damage. Even though I haven't raised birds for years (at least 10 years) I will still occasionally get an email from a former client, with an out of control, now sexually mature, large parrot. Not fun for them or the bird. But even now, even though I don't even own a parrot any longer, I am HAPPY even THRILLED to work them through the behavioral issues. I raised that bird, put it in their hands, and I feel it's still my responsibility to offer lifetime support for those owners so the animal doesn't wind up neglected or abused. That is something I could not bear.

I had to look it up but I was just thinking about this though, you talking about the parrots and some of these birds, I knew they lived a long time, but I didn't realize that it was as long as 50 years or more, holy crap. Also, I read that it was the opposite of dogs, larger breeds live longer, where larger breed dogs don't live as long as smaller breeds, but omg, I saw something say 100 years for a big parrot. That's unreal to me that you'd have to be thinking about this bird outliving you and who would care for it.

It is ridiculous. I used to run into people at parrot shows that had zoological import licenses who imported wild endangered birds. They, were, for the most part, extremely responsible and did everything they could to boost the numbers of dwindelling populations of some species. I approve. But these people were licensed and inspected regularly because it's illegal to own exotic animals in my state unless you are licensed and regularly inspected by the USDA, Federal Wildlife Administration and the Health Department. I at one point actually considered getting a Federal Hawking license, but abandoned the project after realizing I'd have to trap my own wild hawks. LOL. I wasn't so hip on taking an adult out of the wild. I was a bird keeper, breeder and handler; not a trapper. LOL.

In my traveles among exotics, I ran into people from other states who kept wild cats, monkey's, full bred wolves, and other troublesome exotics. I'm quite certain in most cases these folks were not qualified to keep them and I always worried about it. And in fact, I always found those private owners of those kinds of exotics to be bat crap crazy... just my observation. Exotic bird owners and breeders weren't exactly sane in a lot of cases too... espcially on the show circuits. It's part of the reason I got out of showing. Those people were NUTS more often than not. Evil in the extreme cases. I got pretty jaded when it came to people who breed any kind of animal for trade or show. So much so, that I got out of it. We have ONE private zoo here in my state. They do have exotics, they are inspected by three agencies very regularly. They are responsible, respectable and haven't had an animal die in their care from neglect or lack of treatment, nor have any of their animals escaped their enclosures ever. And they and their employees have regular monthly drills to practice breakout scenarios. This is earthquake country, and they are as prepared as can be for that kind of catastrophic event. Probably just as prepared as our federally licensed zoos are.

I think the same thing, they people that own animals like that aren't right in the head. I know that here, just outside of Houston, there was a big deal on the news about these people who had moved into a small town just outside of Houston, they got 2.5 acres and a mobile home, and had a pet lion. They had that lion in a 40 x 40 cage with a golden retriever. I just have no idea how they get by with that, but here it was more a local issue, the city started fining them $200 a day, but if the residents hadn't complained, they would have been allowed to do it, and that's insane. And people just cannot handle these animals. Like when Hurricane Ike hit here, there were some people living down on Bolivar, near Galveston and they had a pet tiger, well here comes a hurricane and they're living right on the beach so they are about to be under water with the storm surge, but they can't put this giant cat in a pet carrier and leave so they evacuate, leave the tiger there and it's all over the news that they have a tiger running loose down there, on top of a hurricane coming. I don't know what ever happened to it, but people just think they're cute put them in a small cage and it's a danger to everyone and a cruel life to the animal.

I agree, my friends who works in a zoo agrees, and I think they did the only thing they could do. It totally SUCKS. It's completely heartbreaking. But I can't see in this case, how it could have been done any differently. I hate that the state and health and animal welfare agencies in Ohio let this happen It's really their fault. They are the ones to blame here.

Yeah, as I understand they'd been looking into this guy already, that the conditions were just unspeakable what they were living in, and that some animals had died and he'd fed the living animals the carcasses. I can't understand how they didn't seize them sooner.

Edited by ChloeB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MissMelsWell

I had to look it up but I was just thinking about this though, you talking about the parrots and some of these birds, I knew they lived a long time, but I didn't realize that it was as long as 50 years or more, holy crap. Also, I read that it was the opposite of dogs, larger breeds live longer, where larger breed dogs don't live as long as smaller breeds, but omg, I saw something say 100 years for a big parrot. That's unreal to me that you'd have to be thinking about this bird outliving you and who would care for it.

Yes, the larger the parrot, the longer they live in most cases, unfortunately, most die from poor care or neglect. They are NOT easy animials to keep and I try to warn people about this all the time. Theyre so cute and sweet when they're 1-8 years of age, then they become sexually mature and go NUTS. They are VERY difficult at that point. Many parrot owners feel their "pet" has "turned" on them and its the older birds that get abused because their caretakers dont understand their biology and surprisingly, even their vets dont understand why a bird, previously compliant and fun, has turned into a psycho freak. There are ways to work with them through those rough years (and it's YEARS), but very little is written or explained about that.

The birds I bred the most of were show cockatiels. They are of course common and smaller in size than the larger exotics. The first parrot I ever owned was a scrubby plain little grey cockatiel named Rainier... he was also the last bird I ever owned. He passed at 21 years of age. I would have my pet Macaw today, he'd be 23 now, but 9 years ago, my ex-husband in an action of spite, gave him away when we were going through a nasty divorce without my knowledge or approval. I raised that bird from an egg in an incubator. I was crushed... but I later learned, some 3 years after I lost him, that my ex did actually give him to good folks. Folks who understood exotic birds and provided him with a life mate. I ran into them at a garden center (never having met them before) and they had my Macaw with them. When my bird spotted me, he started screaming my daughters name (he never said my name). I got to handle him a last time and say good bye for good. He was happy where he was with his new people and his mate who was with eggs back at his new home. Heartbreaking, but all ok at the same time. My guy was a happy guy, so therefore I was happy for him. I wanted to take him home right then and there, but I couldn't break those folks hearts and couldn't break his mates heart either.

There's a point where you have to say good-bye and let go when it's in the animals best interest. I wish this man in Ohio had understood that and found appropriate homes for his exotics.

And yes, in my original will that I had when I was married, my macaw who could have lived 100 years, was willed to my daughter, if she didnt want or couldnt care for him, he was to go to a specific facility I'd chosen in Florida, outside of Orlando. When it comes to large exotic birds, people need to realize that they have to make plans for them. We dont' live as long as our pet parrots could when given the proper care.

Edited by MissMelsWell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
little_dreamer

I think the problem is not allowing these animals in the country except under tightly controlled conditions. Easier said than done. It's difficult to regulate every shipping container and vessel that comes into our borders. These animals are being stolen from their native habitat by poachers, and smuggled in the country. Then the animals are privately sold, sometimes several times, and end up in the hands of people like the guy that just killed himself in Ohio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myles

Yes.

7 billion / 1400 = 5 million humans for every tiger.

So unless that one tiger was going to kill 5 million and one humans it was more worthwhile to capture them I think. But they killed 18 of the poor things... 18 x 5m = 90m humans. So unless those tigers were going to wipe out near a quarter of the US population by wandering in the woods and countryside...

Plus there's nothing to say that people would have been killed. Keep the local area locked down till it's over.

Tigers are hardly the only species in the world today being crushed by humanity's ever expanding population.

So it is strictly a numbers game to you. I guess if you had a child and a tiger was attackin him/her that you would not shoot the tiger even if you had a loaded gun in your hands. Gotta play the numbers, right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
__Kratos__

So it is strictly a numbers game to you. I guess if you had a child and a tiger was attackin him/her that you would not shoot the tiger even if you had a loaded gun in your hands. Gotta play the numbers, right.

Now if there was a kid in the jaws of a tiger, then I could see shooting it but shooting dozens of innocent animals on the if and maybes of the world is a bit out there for me.

Most of the animals they shot were within the area of their pens. Pretty pathetic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rafterman

It's always interesting to see all of the law enforcement, legal, and animal control "experts" come out of the woodwork when situations like this arise.

"just get a tranq gun" - how many of you know where to get one of those, how many of you know how to prepare the drugs, how many of you are trained in its use, etc. etc.

Now, while you're trying to figure all of this out, find the necessary experts, etc, keep in mind you've got the mayor screaming at you to do something immediately because he/she has a whole town that is shut down, schools closed, people cowering in their homes, and huddling with their children.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Myles

Most of the animals they shot were within the area of their pens. Pretty pathetic.

You; just making guesses about the situation, pretty pathetic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.