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Mike 215

Did the Romans have cars?How a

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Harte

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus.

Big talk. All hat and no cattle?

Where's your evidence?

It's not all that surprising that the Roman's might depict a globular world, since they knew the world was round.

As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS.

Sorry, but yes we can. Neither culture had anything like this.

If you think otherwise, then you are ignorant and refuse to be otherwise.

After all, Romans could write, and we have an awful lot of their writings.

Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.

The Roman Empire was almost done 2000 years ago.

So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.

So, since you neither have evidence, nor enough education, to back up your wild claims, it must be other people's fault?

Also, there's nothing about humankind in the historic era (about which you are blathering) that says anything at all about the theory of evolution.

Harte

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Oniomancer

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus. Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.

Here's the numismatic link again since you apparently missed it when I botched it the first time:

http://www.acsearch.info/search.html?search=similar%3A273527

Each picture clicks through to enlargeable versions.

No-one has to claim anything. You can see quite clearly that there is nothing resembling a vehicle of any kind, unless she's steering a flying carpet. No wheels. No engine. No transmission. Not even a proper chassis. Just a flat surface over the words Via Traiana, a branch, and a bit of something that looks like rocks or pillows behind her. The "steering wheel" isn't even connected to anything. The robes are plainly visible as such in virtually all the other coins. No-one's going to claim them as fake on the basis of the image alone because what they actually represent should be painfully obvious to anyone.

I have little doubt your other examples are similarly mis-identified.

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Mr Right Wing

How advanced were the Romans and the ancients? Maybe they had cars. In 100 AD there was a coin minted to celebrate the making of the first highway in Rome. This coin shows the Roman emperor Trajan driving a car with his hand on a steering wheel and he is wearing a seat belt. Here is a quote from a coin magazine about this coin:

"Via traiana, an extension of the Appian Way in southern Italy. The depiction of the personification of the highway is reminiscient of the art nouvean posters of the 20s and 30s advertising motor cars."

Here are some web sites: http://tjbuggey.ancients.info/viatraj.html

http:tjbuggey.ancients.info/images//viatraj.jpg

So what are the implications? IF the Romans had a working steam or gasoline engine, they we know how the pyramids were built.

You are quite correct that the Romans invented the steam engine and created the concept of powering a cart with it.

The official position is that they failed due to their steam engines lacking the power to drive large machines. I'm only aware of small steam powered devices being recovered from the Roman peroid so there is no evidence to suggest otherwise.

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Big Bad Voodoo

Why would anyone think that people would hide such an ancient invention for the general public?

Here:

The steam engine by Hero of Alexandria:

Aeolipile_illustration.JPG

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeolipile

Ah, I see Taun already beat me to it.

.

Edited by the L

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Gaden

These Roman and Greek coins have things on them that are very controversial such as flying machines and deplictions of the ROUND GLOBE WITH ITS CONTINENTS 2000 years before Columbus. Coin collectors are very nervous about these things such as the vehicle on this coin. So they never bring up the subject because if they do the unscientific community will immediately claim the coins are not real. If that happens the price of them drops quickly. So the coin collectors try to cover the truth by claiming in ths coin that the seat belt was really part of a woman's robe or that the steering wheel represents carts or something like that. However, the opinion of one coin collector which I quoted said that the coin remindied him of posters of motor cars in the 1920s.

As for the technology, the British were the first to build steam engines in the 18th century and within a hundred years they were powering ships and trains. From our own experinces with technology nobody can say that the Romans or Greece or even the Egyptians did not have steam engines or even gasoline or ELECTRIC MOTORS. Remember the Baghdad batteries that were over 2000 years old? How much longer would it take them to build an electric motor? I think it took the Europeans around fifty or 75 years to go from batteries to motors.

So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.

Oh, god, stop it Mikey, my sides are hurting... aww geez, is this guy funny, or what?

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Lilly

... So you would think that with such technology there would be artifacts. But the people doing the digging are the members of the unscienific community and they are good and getting rid of anything that does not fit into the theory of evolution.

What the heck does the notion of Roman era cars have to do with the theory of evolution? :blink:

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ShadowSot

Mike, your ignorance is showing. Christopher Columbus did not find the world was round they'd already started producing globes before he left on his voyage.

Read this thread

Then we'll talk about cars.

Edited by ShadowSot

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Moonie2012

This is idiocy at it's worst.

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Mike 215

The car is small change. How about a helicopter? The 'small steam engine' built by Hero of Alexandria was more then a steam engine. Let me quote the Wikipedia article on the Aeolipile (see google):

"An Aerolipile, also known as a Hero engine, IS A ROCKET POWERED STYLE JET ENGINE WHICH SPEEDS UP WHEN HEATED...

That was step one. Step two: Look up TIP JETS on google. After World War II a new type of helicopter was built using the Aeolipile as a bais for propulsion. One type had small ram jets at the end of the roters and others had a jet engine b.lowing hot air through the rotor to produce thrust.

Now if they took the little toy and enlarged it fifty times, guess what you have?

As for evidences of such technology, I know where you can find it: THE VATICAN LIBRARY. The Romans looted the Alexdrian Library and sent to good stuff back to rome, but made copies of everything which the left in the library. It would be nice to see the actual works of Hero, but the church does not allow the public to do read any books. Only church people and some non-church people like SS Major Von Braun to do research. (I forgot to mention the first tip jet helicopter was built by the Nazis and after the war it was brought to the US along with its inventor who worked for Hiller Aviation which built the first tip jet helicopter

in the US, the Hiller YH32 Hornet

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ShadowSot

This is idiocy at it's worst.

Wouldn't go nearly so far, idiocy at it's worse actually causes harm. This is more amusement.

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Aus Der Box Skeptisch

Didn't Tesla an American have moreto do with the electric motor. Please correct me if I am in error....

And Mike your priceless thank you I needed a topic like this today... it was beginning to become too serious around here.

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Englishgent

Hey Mike.

I have found some more evidence for you.

3. This coin obviously shows a roman guy having just parked his car (the wheel of which can clearly be seen to his left) and he is asking another person if they have a coin for the parking meter (obviously what that tall pillar between the two people is)

1. The latest fashion in Mag Alloys.

2. This is clearly a roman using a car to round up horses. There were numerous examples of this type of thing. They also had one where they were rounding up elephants!

:devil:

edit. Sorry about the numbering being out, the pics didnt appear same in order i d/loaded them

post-121346-0-11064400-1321669083_thumb.

post-121346-0-03201400-1321669099_thumb.

post-121346-0-16752800-1321669115_thumb.

Edited by Englishgent

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Reason101

Where on earth do some of these ideas come from ? of course they didn't have cars ,they had chariots ,carts and horses .Happily for historians many texts on roman technology have survived from the period and trust me if there had been a single internal combustion engine or even a steam powered one we would know ,why ? because it would have been used as part of a weapon before anything else and there would be mention of it in the works of Tacitus etc .The coin depicts a goddess and the "seat belt" is part of her clothing .

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Sir Wearer of Hats

As for evidences of such technology, I know where you can find it: THE VATICAN LIBRARY. The Romans looted the Alexdrian Library and sent to good stuff back to rome, but made copies of everything which the left in the library. It would be nice to see the actual works of Hero, but the church does not allow the public to do read any books. Only church people and some non-church people like SS Major Von Braun to do research. (I forgot to mention the first tip jet helicopter was built by the Nazis and after the war it was brought to the US along with its inventor who worked for Hiller Aviation which built the first tip jet helicopter

Well there's a massive difference between the Vatican Library and Roman Libraries. Mostly on the grounds the Roman ones were sacked long before the Papal State came into being and secondly the Vatican went through the whole "it's not in the Bible, it's heretical nonsense" phase a few centuries back.

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Lady_Mercury

hmm... she's looking behind, as if she's just heard the siren and saw the lights come on?

She's overtaking, duh!

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PersonFromPorlock

Not only did the Romans have carts rather than cars, but the most important advance in transportation technology in the next thousand years was the invention of the horse collar - which, believe it or not, was tremendously important.

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Golden Duck

No seatbelt? Then what is going across his lap? The belt seems to be loose because he seems to be parking the machine. NOtice his head is turned to the back as he backs up into the royal parking spot.

So those of you who cannot believe the Romans built such a machine, here is another anwser: it was brought back by a time traveler. ...

So the time traveler came from a country with left-hand traffic.

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JesseCuster

Mike, where do you come up with this nonsense?

A Roman coin shows the a Roman driver in an internal combustion engine driven car, complete with seatbelt, backing up into the royal parking spot, and coin collectors know this, but refuse to say anything for fear that the dreaded scientific community (who we know from previous posts of yours are pedophiles) will call the coins fakes.

I can rely on this website for my daily quota of nutty claims.

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lilthor

The Romans had carts, not cars:

roman_cart_mosaic_from_the_frigidarium_ostia_italy_c150_1228265.jpg

And this is your goddess holding a wheel:

viatraj.jpg

.

This goddess is clearly seated behind the wheel of an Antoyoninus Prius (early hybrid circa 150 CE)

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Druidus-Logos
The first working steam-powered vehicle that we know about was likely to have been designed by Ferdinand Verbiest, a Flemish member of a Jesuit mission in China around 1672. It was a 25 and a half inch long scale-model toy for the Chinese Emperor, that was unable to carry a driver or a passenger.

But, for all we know, maybe a steam-powered vehicle was built centuries earlier.

I'm not sure if anyone has said this yet, but the Greeks predate that use of steam power by a good 1.6 millenia. Hero of Alexandria, although it may even predate him. They had the steam engine, and I recall reading of it being used in small toys, much like the one created for the Chinese Emperor. They never, however, developed it further, otherwise we'd have gone through the Indust. Rev. almost 2000 years ago.

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Druidus-Logos

Where on earth do some of these ideas come from ? of course they didn't have cars ,they had chariots ,carts and horses .Happily for historians many texts on roman technology have survived from the period and trust me if there had been a single internal combustion engine or even a steam powered one we would know ,why ? because it would have been used as part of a weapon before anything else and there would be mention of it in the works of Tacitus etc .The coin depicts a goddess and the "seat belt" is part of her clothing .

I disagree, steam powered engine/s alone do not an industrial revolution make. The Greeks were aware of steam engine technology before the common era. They used it for small toys and small practical applications like opening temple doors (possibly). It was probably lack of population density and lack of an existing sufficient infrastructure to develop the tech further that halted it. Oh, and those pesky Romans causing problems.

Under similar circumstances, it could easily have been different.

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Mike 215

The only way to answer some of these questions is to get into the Vatican Libray and have the freedom to see any books or documents. There is a section of the Library that deals with ancient Egyptian scrolls. We are told we should have freedom to do research, yet the Vatican does not believe in such notiions. I would love to see the sections dealng with World War II, Hitler and Pearl Harbor. The Vatican had its spies everywhere.

The Library was the heart of Renaissance movement which was the rebirth of learning based on Green and Roman works. They got the writers and geographers and scientists into Library where they free to plagiarize to their hearts content. Columbus was given the Piri Reis Map of the Carribean and Da Vinci was shown engineering diagrams of ancient technology as the helicopter, tank, machine gun and other future investions. He was 500 years ahead of his time. So where did he get such ideas? Da Vinci has access to the Library because he advised the Popes.

Edited by Mike 215

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Mr Right Wing

I disagree, steam powered engine/s alone do not an industrial revolution make. The Greeks were aware of steam engine technology before the common era. They used it for small toys and small practical applications like opening temple doors (possibly). It was probably lack of population density and lack of an existing sufficient infrastructure to develop the tech further that halted it. Oh, and those pesky Romans causing problems.

Under similar circumstances, it could easily have been different.

They didnt have steel, they didnt have Newtons classical mechanics to understand the world around them and their philosophy was filled with nonsense like water, air, fire and earth preventing them making huge advances.

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Abramelin

They didnt have steel, they didnt have Newtons classical mechanics to understand the world around them and their philosophy was filled with nonsense like water, air, fire and earth preventing them making huge advances.

And their philosophy and ideas and inventions were the basis of the later western civilization.

Damn idiots.

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Sir Wearer of Hats

They didnt have steel, they didnt have Newtons classical mechanics to understand the world around them and their philosophy was filled with nonsense like water, air, fire and earth preventing them making huge advances.

The Romans had steel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel) albeit they didn't have the technology to produce it in the quantities we do, or in the quality we do. Furthermore, Newton wasn't exactly exempt from what we'd call the nuttier aspects of his age - he was an alchemist looking for the philosopher's stone after all. He believed the body was governed by five "humours" such as bile and blood (but not as we understand blood). And then there's Damascus Steel which we can't reproduce to this day and then there's pyramids which we'd have trouble building ourselves now let alone with the technology available to people 'then'. They were hardly slouches in the intellect department just because they thought the Earth was the centre of the universe or that p***ed off gods were responsible for lightning and fire.

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