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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


Abramelin
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And into English that is 'fine'.

Originally 'highest quality, end, termination'.

See fine etymology. (Fine and finish)

But the word "fijnen" has a more negative meaning:

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/fijn

See: "fyne broederen". It is about very fundamentally religious people, and was a nickname given to them by those who didn't like these people wearing black all day long, not going to movies, quoting from the Bible 24/7 on any occassion, walking around looking down without a real smile on their faces, and so on.

A good translation would be "sanctimonians".

.

Edited by Abramelin
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But the word "fijnen" has a more negative meaning:

http://www.etymologi.../trefwoord/fijn

See: "fyne broederen". It is about very fundamentally religious people, and was a nickname given to them by those who didn't like these people wearing black all day long, not going to movies, quoting from the Bible 24/7 on any occassion, walking around looking down without a real smile on their faces, and so on.

A good translation would be "sanctimonians".

.

One could think 'divine' was really 'de-fine' 'the finest' - considering it holds a sense of 'excellent'. Vine....? Dionysus - then you could imagine this 'fine brotherhood' being literally 'de-vine/divine brothers' - Brothers of God. fyne broederen. :w00t:

divine (adj.) c.1300, from Old French devin (12c.), from Latin divinus "of a god," from divus "a god," related to deus "god, deity" (see Zeus). Weakened sense of "excellent" had evolved by late 15c.

divine (v.) "to conjure, to guess," originally "to make out by supernatural insight," mid-14c., from Old French deviner, from Vulgar Latin *devinare, dissimilated from *divinare, from Latin divinus (see divine (adj.)), which also meant "soothsayer." Related: Divined; diviner; divining. Divining rod (or wand) attested from 1650s.

divine (n.) c.1300, "soothsayer," from Old French devin, from Latin divinus (adj.); see divine (adj.). Meaning "ecclesiastic, theologian" is from late 14c.

http://www.etymonlin...php?term=divine

Edited by The Puzzler
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The word "tex" in the OLB means something like 'law' or 'rules', but is alo sometimes translated as "leer" (Overwijn), "Lehre" (Wirth), or in English meaning, 'teaching'.

From the Etymologyonline site:

teach (v)

Old English tæcan (past tense tæhte, past participle tæht) "to show, point out, declare, demonstrate," also "to give instruction, train, assign, direct; warn; persuade," from Proto-Germanic *taikijan "to show" (cognates: Old High German zihan, German zeihen "to accuse," Gothic ga-teihan "to announce"), from PIE *deik- "to show, point out" (see diction). Related to Old English tacen, tacn "sign, mark" (see token).

Related: Taught; teaching.

The usual sense of Old English tæcan was "show, declare, warn, persuade" (compare German zeigen "to show," from the same root); while the Old English word for "to teach, instruct, guide" was more commonly læran, source of modern learn and lore.

I think that comes close to the meaning of "tex".

.

Edited by Abramelin
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There's another possibility that the OLB word "tex" is related to an existing ancient word, and that's by metathesis.

From page 33 of

The Frisian Language and Literature: a Historical study.

by W.T. White, 1879

"I. LAWS WRITTEN IN FRISIAN.

These were not composed by the people, but by their judges or representatives, in general assemblies. In content they relate to the most varied domain of law. They contain, like the Lex Frisionum, carefullu detailed statements of the personal rights of individuals and the laws of property with penalties for their violation. The Frisian laws, like the Anglo-Saxon, bear the name domar, judicial decrees also kesta or liudkesta, that is, laws enacted by the popular will (Willküren). Single laws bear the name landriachta (landrechte), or common law of the country"

So I thought, using metathesis: TEX ("teks") = KEST (kesta is the plural of kest).

.

Edited by Abramelin
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From where did the late 19th/ early 20th century occultists get the term Fraja?

In German pre-war occultism, the terms Vril-ya and Fraja both played an important role. The similarities with the OLB name Frya (as well as some of OLB's themes) are remarkable.

Fragment about "Vril-ya" from "Walpurgis Night - Volume One 1919-1933" by Thomas Sheridan, (2014):

pp 105-107 (parts made bold and added hyperlinks by me):

In 1871, a novel by a Rosicrucian named
entitled,
[
...
]
, is perhaps the first work of science fiction designed to generate a sense of expectation within readers, in that the storyline itself would eventually come to pass. [...] Influential occult figures such as
and
, along with other
, claimed that the book's narrative of a master race living inside a hollow earth who possess the power of an energy form which they called Vril was rooted in fact.

In the story, a young adventurer discovers a subterranean civilisation of
angelic Aryan-looking beings called the Vril-ya
. The Vril-ya, who were once human, went to live inside the earth
before the Great Flood
as described in the
Bible
. [...]

[...] the one aspect of Edward Bulwer-Lytton's novel which really captured the imagination of occultists of the time such as the Order of the Templars and
in Germany, was the energy force of the Vril-ya; the "all-permeating fluid" of Vril, which the Ariosophists took to mean
Aryan blood
. A force,
if kept pure and free from being contaminated by other inferior blood races
, could unleash incredible psychic and energetic forces according to the training of one's will. [...] The suggestion is made in the novel that the Vril-ya will eventually return to the surface of the earth if a pure racial Aryan blood group evolves on the surface of the planet, taking with them their awesome magical powers and sharing these powers with the surface
. The idea so excited members of the Thule Society that they formed a group in Berlin called
Wahrheitsgesellschaft
, or The Society for Truth, which was charged with discovering the power of Vril and using it to create wonder weapons.

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The word "tex" in the OLB means something like 'law' or 'rules', but is alo sometimes translated as "leer" (Overwijn), "Lehre" (Wirth), or in English meaning, 'teaching'.

From the Etymologyonline site:

teach (v)

Old English tæcan (past tense tæhte, past participle tæht) "to show, point out, declare, demonstrate," also "to give instruction, train, assign, direct; warn; persuade," from Proto-Germanic *taikijan "to show" (cognates: Old High German zihan, German zeihen "to accuse," Gothic ga-teihan "to announce"), from PIE *deik- "to show, point out" (see diction). Related to Old English tacen, tacn "sign, mark" (see token).

Related: Taught; teaching.

The usual sense of Old English tæcan was "show, declare, warn, persuade" (compare German zeigen "to show," from the same root); while the Old English word for "to teach, instruct, guide" was more commonly læran, source of modern learn and lore.

I think that comes close to the meaning of "tex".

.

Looking into current Frisian - the Fryan concept for tex is probably very similar, as shown - token, proof, sign, seal (sign, mark)

têken 8, tê-k-en, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Zeichen; ne. token; Vw.: s. han-d-, her-e-, wun-d-er-; Hw.: vgl. got. taikn, an. tākn, ae. tācen, anfrk. teikan, as. têkan*, ahd. zeihhan; Q.: E, R, W, Schw; E.: germ. *taikna-, *taiknam, st. N. (a), Zeichen; s. idg. *deik̑-, V., zeigen, weisen, sagen, Pokorny 188; vgl. idg. *dei- (1), *dei̯ə-, *dī-, *di̯ā-, V., glänzen, schimmern, scheinen, Pokorny 183; W.: nfries. teeckne; nnordfries. teeken; L.: Hh 109a, Rh 1066a

têkena, tê-k-en-a, afries., sw. V. (2): Vw.: s. tê-k-n-ia

têkenisse 1, tê-k-e-nisse, afries., st. F. (jō): nhd. Zeichen, Beweis; ne. token, proof; Hw.: vgl. ahd. *zeihhanussi?, mnd. têikenisse, mnl. tekenisse, mhd. zeichenisse; Q.: AA 122 (1536); E.: s. tê-k-n-ia, *-nisse; L.: AA 122

tekkene, tek-k-en-e, afries., F.: Vw.: s. thek-k-en-e

têkna, tê-k-n-a, afries., sw. V. (2): Vw.: s. tê-k-n-ia

têknia 1, têkena, têkna, tê-k-n-ia, tê-k-en-a, tê-k-n-a, afries., sw. V. (2): nhd. „zeichnen“, mit Zeichen versehen, siegeln, aufzeichnen; ne. sign (V.), seal (V.);

Wise Frya! When she had seen her children reach the seventh generation, she summoned them all to Flyland, and there gave them her Tex, saying, “Let this be your guide, and it can never go ill with you.”

Exalted Frya! When she had thus spoken the earth shook like the sea of Wr-alda. The ground of Flyland sank beneath her feet, the air was dimmed by tears, and when they looked for their mother she was already risen to her watching star; then at length thunder burst from the clouds, and the lightning wrote upon the firmament “Watch!”

Edited by The Puzzler
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Being curious, I checked what word is used in the OLB for English translation 'teach' and it is 'learn'.

Macht ik thêr hwat to dvande, thà skol-ik skrywa, aend alsa fêlo êrsêma toghatera vmbe to lêrane,

If I might add more, I would recommend that all the respectable girls in the towns should be taught

Baern mot maen lêre,

You must teach the children

The usual sense of Old English tæcan was "show, declare, warn, persuade" (compare German zeigen "to show," from the same root); while the Old English word for "to teach, instruct, guide" was more commonly læran, source of modern learn and lore.

So, in Frisian and OLB Fryan we have the word tex and its variants = a token, a sign, to show, proof whereas the term for teach/teacan is the more commonly used 'learan' learn, showing that word TEX is rooted in the forms of token, rather than teach, in the OLB at least.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Both in Greece and in India, important places (region, city) have names that are similar to OLB's TEXLAND (or current Dutch Texel, pronounced "Tessel"):

Greece: Thessaly

Northern India: Taxila

"By some accounts, Taxila was considered to be amongst the earliest universities in the world."

The official etymologies are questionable, imo.

Edited by Othar Winis
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It was the homeland of the FINDA, not the Fins.

I know why you make that mistake, and it is because you read about the OLB, but most certainly not in its original language.

People read online English translations, and we have been posting about all those errors in those translations for 4+ years now.

Please read the link in my former post where I answered you. In that link you will see quotes from the OLB you will not find on other websites.

And wasn't there a Robert Scrutton something, who claimed Altantis was in the North Sea, and that it was the homeland of different races. And all based on his version of the OLB.

He never read it.

==

At the beginning of the Oera Linda book we are told the creation account of the three races from the same region.

Please give a quote from the OLB.

+++

EDIT:

Another old post:

http://www.unexplain...85#entry4963887

Read that please, and then tell me - based on whatever logic - Aldland could have been in the North Sea.

.

I'm not Dutch so i can only rely on the standard (1876?) English translation, but i thought it was common knowledge the OLB places Atland/Aldland in northern europe?

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I'm not Dutch so i can only rely on the standard (1876?) English translation, but i thought it was common knowledge the OLB places Atland/Aldland in northern europe?

Its not in Dutch, its in Frisian and since English is not that far from it, its not as hard to read as you might think.

Use this for English next to Frisian/Fryan transliterated text to compare words http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

Heres scans of an original http://www.rodinbook.nl/olbscans.html

Heres a good Frisian dictionary that's handy too http://www.koeblergerhard.de/afrieswbhinw.html

No, it doesn't place it in Northern Europe specifically.

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Its not in Dutch, its in Frisian and since English is not that far from it, its not as hard to read as you might think.

"The pure Friesic and easy wording of the Oera Linda Book must be most welcome to students of English and Saxon, as a widening of the now too narrow ground of the early speech of our fore-fathers.

Wm. BARNES.

Macmillan's Magazine, April 1877, p. 465."

As quoted in "Beweerd maar niet Bewezen" (claimed but not proven) by L.F. Over de Linden, 1877.

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Some thought concerning the Finda, their governance and name.

Throughout OLB one of the most mentionned adverseries of the Fryas.

Physical, but also in behaviour.

Unlike Fryas born, Finda are depicted as trecherous, false, cunning.

Besides the geographical aspect of where they came from and settled, widespread from East to West, they were for most depicted as ruled by ‘false’ intended priests (presbyters, for-runners, instigators).

Trying to look through the possible racial connotations, one could derive from this the widespread and penetrating force of Finda’s priests in Fryas society not to be connected with a certain race but more connected to the penetrating falsehood in governing bodies, synchronical with the subdued eastern groups and using them as invasional Eastern forces into the West.

Now, like we can see today the penetrating barbarian groups to jepordize free society can be cultivated by less visible ruling forces, not connected with a certain location but possible present wherever they can set foot on ground, using that visible force they dominate to infiltrate consequently new areas which they would like to take the leading position. They use it as a fence (sreen) and 'stormram' to hide their own nature but carry out their agenda.

The word ‘findingrikhêd’ (rich in finding cunning ways) is imo connected with the Finda. The art to deceive -> “veinzen” in Dutch.

When Finda are spoken to have hair like the manes of a horse, one could think of any kind of horse manes, curly, straight, brown, black, long, knotted. One can choose, and I thought long, straight, black hair could be the safest to describe Finda. But then I was thinking: is this really so typical for horse manes? Maybe only long hair? But what does this tell: that people from East (india) coming to Scandinavia were having long hair in contrast with here? I dunno.

What I do know is that horse manes are often used for false beards and wigs. And that in disguising one’s true identiy this is also very usefull. Even bandits, priests, judges (many positions with public exposure) used and still use them.

So when we have Barba-Rossa’s it is not unthinkable that the Ross Beard could be very well the beard of a ross (horse).

Even the Egyptian Finda did it :-)

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We have discussed this extensively in march 2012.

teja%2Bwoord.jpg

textile, technique, etc.

So, the question is then...

Proto-Indo-European *teḱs- (“to plait, woodwork, carpenter”) text

Proto-Indo-European *deyǵ-, *deyḱ- (“to show, instruct, teach”). token

From Middle English token, taken, from Old English tācen (“symbol, sign, signal, mark, indication, suggestion; portent, marvel, wonder, miracle; evidence, proof: standard, banner”), from Proto-Germanic *taikną (“sign, token”), from Proto-Indo-European *deyǵ-, *deyḱ- (“to show, instruct, teach”). Cognate with Scots taiken (“sign, token”), West Frisian teken (“sign, token”), Dutch teken (“sign, symbol, token”), German Zeichen (“sign”), Swedish tecken (“sign, mark, indication, token”), Icelandic tákn, teikn (“sign, symbol”), Latin index (“finger”, literally “pointer”), Ancient Greek δείκνυμι (deíknumi, “show, point out, teach”), Albanian theks (“accent, sign”). More at toe

http://en.wiktionary...wiki/texo#Latin

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/token

Do these actually share the same etymology? with teks and deyk actually being the same root..? I could see plait, woodwork, weave coming from the meaning of show, instruct, since you have to be shown these skills to do them. Other ways and words too - making a mark (of text or on wood) tick and tack=indicators/markers - when you tack fabric, you are marking it for proper sewing, tick, a mark indicating a proof (you saw it or such). Even sounds somewhat like the Tjekker (sea people's name). Maybe it's just me that sees these things...

Edited by The Puzzler
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Confirmation in the English language?:

to feint = to deceive, pretend

http://www.etymonlin....php?term=feint

The Finda = The Pretenders ???

Interesting, could be...

fiends.

; a person of great wickedness or maliciousness

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fiend

German = enemy

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Interesting, could be...

fiends.

; a person of great wickedness or maliciousness

http://www.merriam-w...ictionary/fiend

German = enemy

ok, thnx for the info.

Like fiant, fiand, vijand?

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/vijand

"... Proto-Germaans *fijēn- ‘haten’" -> to hate

The Fiands = those who hate (OLB: they see everywhere evil in things)

See also satan (Herbrew for enenmy) -> satan worshippers are said to be drawn in particular to the bad(dark) side of things.

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ok, thnx for the info.

Like fiant, fiand, vijand?

http://www.etymologi...refwoord/vijand

"... Proto-Germaans *fijēn- ‘haten’" -> to hate

The Fiands = those who hate (OLB: they see everywhere evil in things)

See also satan (Herbrew for enenmy) -> satan worshippers are said to be drawn in particular to the bad(dark) side of things.

It must be fiand in Frisian, yes: 6. Jef wi selwa fyanda fâta,

fīand 29, fīund, fī-and, fī-und, afries., M. (nd): nhd. Feind; ne. enemy;

fīandskip 6, fī-and-skip, afries., st. F. (i?): nhd. Feindschaft; ne. hostility;

fiend (n.) Old English feond "enemy, foe," originally present participle of feogan "to hate," from Proto-Germanic *fijand- "hating, hostile" (cognates: Old Frisian fiand "enemy," Old Saxon fiond, Middle Dutch viant, Dutch vijand "enemy," Old Norse fjandi, Old High German fiant, Gothic fijands), from suffixed form of PIE root *pe(i)- "to hurt" (source also of Gothic faian "to blame;" see passion).

As spelling suggests, it was originally the opposite of friend, but the word began to be used in Old English for "Satan" (as the "enemy of mankind"), which shifted its sense to "diabolical person" (early 13c.). The old sense of the word devolved to foe, then to the imported word enemy. For spelling with -ie- see field. Meaning "devotee (of whatever is indicated)," as in dope fiend, is from 1865.

The fiends, the enemy, the foes, the ones who we have hostilities with, with hatred between them. Interesting how the spelling represents the opposite of friend and it appears "Satan" is indeed 'hate' - the enemy Finda and her people.

Edited by The Puzzler
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What about Lyda..?

We did loud, leader, maybe even people or lie words but I don't think they are right actually, now we figured out what Finda means, so delved some more...

What words can transfer as LYDA? Ly-da, Lie-da, Li-da

Apparently this seems to: litha

lītha 4, lī-th-a, afries., st. V. (1): nhd. leiden; ne. suffer; Hw.: s. lêth (1); vgl. got. *leiþan, an. līða (1), ae. līþan (1), anfrk. līthan, as. līthan, ahd. līdan; Q.: W, H, Jur; E.: germ. *leiþan, *līþan, st. V., weggehen, gehen, fahren, leiden; idg. *leit- (2), V., gehen, fortgehen, sterben, Pokorny 672; s. idg. *lei- (3), Adj., V., schleimig, klebrig, gleiten, glätten, streichen, Pokorny 662; W.: nfries. lyen, lye, lit, V., leiden; L.: Hh 67a, Rh 906b

http://www.koeblerge...s/afries_l.html

Lyda = suffer....?

Poor Lyda! She turned grey by her mad behaviour, and at last she died heart-broken by the wickedness of her children. Foolish children! They accused each other of their mother’s death. They howled and fought like wolves, and while they did this the birds devoured the corpse. Who can refrain from tears at such a recital?

Edited by The Puzzler
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What about Lyda..?

We did loud, leader, maybe even people or lie words but I don't think they are right actually, now we figured out what Finda means, so delved some more...

What words can transfer as LYDA? Ly-da, Lie-da, Li-da

Apparently this seems to: litha

lītha 4, lī-th-a, afries., st. V. (1): nhd. leiden; ne. suffer; Hw.: s. lêth (1); vgl. got. *leiþan, an. līða (1), ae. līþan (1), anfrk. līthan, as. līthan, ahd. līdan; Q.: W, H, Jur; E.: germ. *leiþan, *līþan, st. V., weggehen, gehen, fahren, leiden; idg. *leit- (2), V., gehen, fortgehen, sterben, Pokorny 672; s. idg. *lei- (3), Adj., V., schleimig, klebrig, gleiten, glätten, streichen, Pokorny 662; W.: nfries. lyen, lye, lit, V., leiden; L.: Hh 67a, Rh 906b

http://www.koeblerge...s/afries_l.html

Lyda = suffer....?

Poor Lyda! She turned grey by her mad behaviour, and at last she died heart-broken by the wickedness of her children. Foolish children! They accused each other of their mother’s death. They howled and fought like wolves, and while they did this the birds devoured the corpse. Who can refrain from tears at such a recital?

Wow, good one.

I always somehow connected Lyda with the common people ("lieden", "lui" in Dutch).

But now you mention "to suffer". Why not? "lijden" in dutch is to suffer, to undergo the situation.

"lijden" with "ij" (earlier written as "y", also called long "ei") meaning to suffer, to undergo, have to put with

in contrast with "leiden" (called short "ei") meaning to take the lead, to guide, to be in control

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/lijden

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I always somehow connected Lyda with the common people ("lieden", "lui" in Dutch).

The word for that in OLB is LJU(D) (where J can be I and U can be V).

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The word for that in OLB is LJU(D) (where J can be I and U can be V).

And IMO cannot transfer to the name LYDA.

Do you have an opinion on Lydas name meaning 'suffer'?

I also think the Finda translation as 'fiends' (enemies) is correct.

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To clarify, the Finna are named for their formal FINER ceremonies and Findas name and those called Findas folk derive from the FIEND meaning.

Now I also like Lyda as SUFFER meaning, LITHA and it always seemed quite obvious that Frya means FREE. That's what I'm going for all their name meanings.

Edited by The Puzzler
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I also think the Finda translation as 'fiends' (enemies) is correct.

No, the OLB-word for fiend is FJAND (see letter Liko).

Adapted from an earlier post (2011):

The verb "FINDA"

A study of the meaning of the name FINDA, from the second mother of the creation myth.

Dutch - vinden

German - finden

Danish - find

Norwegian - finner

English - to find

Icelandic - finna

1. [004/12]

FORTH SKOLD.IK RÉDA

J MOSTE NÉI THA BURGUM GÁ.

ÀND THÉR VPSKRÍWA ALLE ÉWA. FRYA.S TEX.

BIJVNKA ALLE SKÍDNISA.

JÁ ELLA THÀT.ER TO FINDA SÍ. VPPA WÁGUM.

TIL THJU ELLA NAVT VRLÊREN NI GÁ

ÀND MITH.A BURGUM ALSA VRDÉN NAVT NE WERTH

I should farther recommend

that you should visit all the citadels,

and write down all the laws and Frya's Tex,

as well as all the histories,

and all that one can find on the walls,

in order that it may not be lost

and destroyed with the citadels

2. [011/08]

ÀND VMBE THAT ALLERA MANNALIK HJA SKOLDE MÜGA FINDA

HÀVATH HJA THÀT LAND RONDOMME TEX.LAND HÉTEN

and that every one should be able to find it

they called the land about it Texland

3. [018/04]

ÀND FINDATH HJU THJU SÉKE TVIVELIK

SÂ MOT HJU TO BÁTE FON THÉR MÉNTE SPRÉKA

and she finds the case to be doubtful,

she must speak in the benefit of the community

4. [027/26]

JEF MÀN VPPE RÉIS BIFINTH

THÀT THENE KÉNING ÀRG JEFTA VNBIKVMMEN IS.

SÁ MÜGON HJA EN ÔRA NIMMA

If one finds out during a voyage

that the king is bad or incompetent,

they may take another

5. [030/28]

JEF WI VS VPPEN VRLANDISKA MÀRKT FINDA.

SY.ET HÉINDE JEFTHA FÉR

If we find ourselves on a foreign market,

whether distant or near

6. [036/02]

WITH ALLE RAMPUM IS RÉD ÀND HELP TO FINDANDE

For all calamities there is counsel and remedy to be found

7. [080/12]

KREK HONDRED JÉR EFTERE DÉI THAT ET FORMA SKIP

MITH LIFTOCHTA FONA KÁD FÁREN WAS.

KÉM ERMODE ÀND LOK THRVCH THA ANDERNA BINNA.

HONGER SPRÉDA SINA WJVKA ÀND STRÉK VPPET LAND DEL.

TWISPALT HLIP STOLTE IN OVERE STRÉTA ÀND FORTH TO THA HÚSA IN.

LJAFDE NE KV NÉN STEK LÔNGER NAVT FINDA

ÀND ÉNDRACHT RUN ÉWÉI

Correct one hundred years after the first ship

with provisions sailed from the coast,

poverty and want entered through the windows,

hunger spread her wings and descended on the land,

dissension marched proudly about the streets and into the houses,

love could no longer find a place,

and unity ran away

8. [087/28]

HIRA LERSTA WILLE WAS SOK ÀND NARNE TO FINDNE

her last will was lost and nowhere to be found

9. [099/10]

ÀND THÉR NIS NÉNE WISHÉD TO FINDANDE NER TO GARJANDE BUTA THAM

nor is there any wisdom to be found or gathered but in them

10. [100/03]

OVER.FINDINGRIKHÉD

over-inventiveness [litterally: over-findingrichness]

11. [107/06]

IN VPPA THÉRE SÚDERWACH IS THÉNE TEX WRYTEN.

AN THA FÉRE SÍDE THÉRA FINTH MÀN THJU FORM.LÉRE.

ANNA WINSTERE SÍDE THA ÉWA.

THA ORA SÉKA FINTH MÀN VPPA ÔRA THRJA

On the south wall the Tex is inscribed.

On the right side of this one finds the formulae,

and on the left side the laws;

the other things are found upon the three other sides

12. [118/02]

KÀNST ÉN ÀND ÔR TOBEK FORA NÉI HJRA LÁNDUM

THÀN ÁCHSTE SPOD TO MÁKJANDE.

OWERS NE SKILUN HJA HJARA MÁGA NAVT WITHER NE FINDA

Can you send one and other back to their lands?

then you should make speed,

or they will not find back their relatives

13. [120/16]

THA HWILA VSA SÉKÀMPAR

ALLE SÉA BIFÁREN HÉDE

THÉR TO FINDANE

whilst our naval warriors

had navigated all the seas

there to be found

14. [141/04]

FINDA.S FOLK SKIL SINA FINDINGRIKHÉD

TO MÉMA NITHA WENDA.

THÀT LYDA.S FOLK SINA KRÀFTA ÀND WI VSA WISDOM

Finda's folk shall contribute their industry [litt. 'findingrichness', see #10]

to the common good,

Linda's folk their strength, and we our wisdom

15. [158/11]

THÁ WR.ALDA BERN JEF ANTHA MODERA FON THÀT MÀNNISKELIK SLACHTE

THÁ LÉIDER ÉNE TÁLE IN ALLER TONGA ÀND VP ALLER LIPPA.

THJUS MÉIDE HÉDE WR.ALDA ANTHA MÀNNISKA JÉVEN.

TIL THJU HJA MÀNLIK ÔTHERA THÉRMITH MACHTE KÀNBÉR MÁKJA.

HWAT MÀN FORMÍDE MOT ÀND HWAT MÀN BIJAGJA MOT

VMBE SÉLIGHÉD TO FINDANE ÀND SÉLIGHÉD TO HALDANE IN AL ÉVGHÉD

When Wr-alda gave children to the mothers of mankind,

he gave one language to every tongue and to all lips.

This gift Wr-alda had bestowed upon men

in order that by its means they might make known to each other

what must be avoided and what must be followed

to find salvation, and to hold salvation to all eternity

16. [167/18]

KVMTH MAN ÉL WEST.LIK FON PANG.AB

THEN FINTH MAN NEFFEN FETTE ETTA ÁK DORRA GÉST.LANDA

THÉR VN.ENDLIK SKINA

BIHWILA OFWIXLATH MITH LJAFLIKA STRÉKA

HWÉRAN THET ÁG FORBONDEN BILÍWET

To the extreme west of the Punjab

there is found rich clay land as well as barren heaths,

which seem endless,

occasionally varied lovely spots

on which the eye rests enchanted

17. [189/21]

ÁK WIVA THER HJARA BERN MÀMA LÉTA AN HJARA BROSTA

WERTHAT FÉDSTRA HÉTEN.

THÁ NE JÉF VVR.ALDA THÉR NÉN MELOK IN

SA NE SKOLDON THA BERN THÉR NÉNE BÁTE BY FINDA.

SÁ THÀT BÍ SLOT FON REKNONG

VVR.ALDA ALLÉNA FÉDER BILÍWET

also women who nourish their children at their breasts

are called feedsters,

but if Wr-alda did not give milk in there

the children would find no advantage;

so that, at the end of the calculation,

Wr-alda alone stays feeder ( * )

( * ) this word later evolved into father, but was initially genderless.

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