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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


Abramelin

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The Fryans expected the mound to provide eternal protection for the Tex. At least while the earth shall be the earth...

Obedient children! When they came to themselves again, they made this high mound and built this citadel upon it, and on the walls they wrote the Tex, and that every one should be able to find it they called the land about it Texland. Therefore it shall remain as long as the earth shall be the earth.

Hêriga baern. Thâ hja to-ra selva wêron, thâ mâkadon hja thit hâge therp, bvwadon thâs burch thêrvppa

But that doesn't prove that wierde or waard or wrda has anything to do with protection. And they use the word 'therp', btw.

(btw, the editor sucks major, so excuses for the last bold line, including this one)

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Just to show how sources sometimes SEEM to contradict eachother.

I think we all know that terps and wierdes were artificially created mounds in swampy areas or near flooding rivers and the sea coast.

Well, read this:

From Wiki:

An artificial dwelling hill (known as Terp, Wierde, Woerd, Warf, Warft, Werf, Wurt and Værft) is a mound, created to provide safe ground during high tide and river floods. These hills occur in the coastal parts of the Netherlands (in the provinces of Zeeland, Friesland and Groningen), in southern part of Denmark and in Germany where, before dikes were made, tides interfered with daily life. They also occur in the Rhine and Meuse river plains in the central part of the Netherlands.

http://en.wikipedia....l_dwelling_hill

And now this (first part in Dutch, then comes the English translation):

De naam 'wierde' is verwant met het woord 'waard' in de betekenis 'door water omgeven stuk land' of 'buitendijks gelegen land'. Dit woord zie je bijvoorbeeld ook terug in 'uiterwaard'. Het woord is niet verwant aan het werkwoord "werpen"; het is dus geen opgeworpen heuvel (zie -werf). Het in Groningen gebruikte woord wierde staat dicht bij het originele woord wurth, waarvan de uitgang -werd of -ward is afgeleid.

De naam 'wierde' komt vooral voor in de provincie Groningen in Nederland. In Friesland wordt het terp genoemd. Dit Friese woord, dat eigenlijk dorp betekent, wordt nu algemeen gebruikt, hoewel ook in Friesland nogal wat plaatsnamen op -werd eindigen. In Noord-Duitsland heet zo'n heuvel Warft, in Denemarken worden ze vaerfter genoemd. Op het (voormalige) eiland Marken wordt zo'n heuvel 'werf' genoemd.

Afgeleiden van het woord wierde komen voor in plaatsnamen, bijvoorbeeld in de eerder genoemde: Sauwerd, Rasquert, Warffum en Usquert, maar ook in Aduard en Leeuwarden en in de Duitse gemeente Krummhörn de plaatsnamen Loquard, Upleward, Visquard en Woquard.

http://nl.wikipedia....erde_(landvorm)

The name 'wierde' is related to the word 'waard' in the meaning of 'piece of land surrounded by water' or 'land outside a dike'. You see it again in for instance 'uiterwaard'. The word is not related to the verb "werpen" (throw, cast shed, drop); so it's not a raised mound (see -werf). The word 'wierde' that's being used in Groningen is close to the the original word 'wurth, of which the suffix -werd or -ward has been derived.

The name 'wierde' is found especially in the Dutch province of Groningen. In Friesland it's called 'terp'. This Frisian word, which really means village, is now commonly used, although also in Friesland quite a few place names end in -werd. In north Germany such a mound is called 'Warft', in Denmark they are called 'vaerfter'. On the (former) island of Marken such a mound is called 'werf'.

Derivatives of the word 'wierde' show up in place names, for example in the already mentioned Sauwerd, Rasquert, Warffum and Usquert, but also in Aduard and Leeuwarden and in the German municipality of Krummhörn you have place names like Loquard, Upleward, Visquard en Woquard.

So a wierde IS an artificial mound, but the name is etymologically not related to anything raised or built. Instead it is related to a word meaning 'land surrounded by water'.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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What the f is this? The Twilight Zone? I did read your post Otharus, and it was funny. And no, we are not married, lol.

OK, back to business.

Somewhere in the beginning of this thread (2 years ago, see part -1-) we shortly discussed the

meaning/origin of the name "Fries" (Frisian). Well, the most common (but still quite stupid) etymologies

suggest it means 'curly', or 'cool' (ie not warm).

Now we all know that the OLB talks quite a lot about the Fryans (let's say, the proto-Frisians), and from

standard (Frisian) history it is known the Frisians sailed (and settled) far and wide, and they very

probably have inspired the Vikings ages later.

So, the connection between 'Fries'/Frisian and sailing seems obvious, but I really never thought to

connect the two etymologically.....

Well, someone did:

Dutch:

bron: Nieuw Letterkundig Magazijn. Jaargang 14. Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde, Leiden 1996

Montse (de Haan) Hettema (1796-1873)

(...)

Onbedoeld komisch zijn af en toe de etymologische afleidingen die Hettema ten beste gaf - ooit gedacht

dat Friesland komt van fris (dat wil zeggen: nieuw) land, terwijl de Friezen daarentegen zo heten omdat

zij in oorsprong varenden waren?

(...)

Klaas van der Hoek

http://www.dbnl.org/...601_01_0007.php

English:

source: New Literary Magazine. Volume 14. Society of Dutch Literature, Leiden 1996

Montse (de Haan) Hettema (1796-1873)

(...)

Occasionally the etymological derivations Hettema gave at best were unintentionally comical - ever

thought that "Friesland" comes from fresh (ie new) land, while the Frisians on the other hand were so

called because they originally were sea-farers?

(...)

Klaas van der Hoek

++++++++

EDIT: I don't know, but I think a bit more than just Otharus' post got deleted....

.

Edited by Abramelin
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I said:

Now we all know that the OLB talks quite a lot about the Fryans (let's say, the proto-Frisians),

I meant to say:

"Now we all know that the OLB talks quite a lot about the Fryans (let's say, the proto-Frisians) and sailing."

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Yeah, where did his post go?

I tell ya, I'm glad Abe is here for me to banter this with, my family have no interest in discussing the word 'ward' with me for 2 hours....

  • Haha 1
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Just to show how sources sometimes SEEM to contradict eachother.

I think we all know that terps and wierdes were artificially created mounds in swampy areas or near flooding rivers and the sea coast.

Well, read this:

From Wiki:

An artificial dwelling hill (known as Terp, Wierde, Woerd, Warf, Warft, Werf, Wurt and Værft) is a mound, created to provide safe ground during high tide and river floods. These hills occur in the coastal parts of the Netherlands (in the provinces of Zeeland, Friesland and Groningen), in southern part of Denmark and in Germany where, before dikes were made, tides interfered with daily life. They also occur in the Rhine and Meuse river plains in the central part of the Netherlands.

http://en.wikipedia....l_dwelling_hill

And now this (first part in Dutch, then comes the English translation):

De naam 'wierde' is verwant met het woord 'waard' in de betekenis 'door water omgeven stuk land' of 'buitendijks gelegen land'. Dit woord zie je bijvoorbeeld ook terug in 'uiterwaard'. Het woord is niet verwant aan het werkwoord "werpen"; het is dus geen opgeworpen heuvel (zie -werf). Het in Groningen gebruikte woord wierde staat dicht bij het originele woord wurth, waarvan de uitgang -werd of -ward is afgeleid.

De naam 'wierde' komt vooral voor in de provincie Groningen in Nederland. In Friesland wordt het terp genoemd. Dit Friese woord, dat eigenlijk dorp betekent, wordt nu algemeen gebruikt, hoewel ook in Friesland nogal wat plaatsnamen op -werd eindigen. In Noord-Duitsland heet zo'n heuvel Warft, in Denemarken worden ze vaerfter genoemd. Op het (voormalige) eiland Marken wordt zo'n heuvel 'werf' genoemd.

Afgeleiden van het woord wierde komen voor in plaatsnamen, bijvoorbeeld in de eerder genoemde: Sauwerd, Rasquert, Warffum en Usquert, maar ook in Aduard en Leeuwarden en in de Duitse gemeente Krummhörn de plaatsnamen Loquard, Upleward, Visquard en Woquard.

http://nl.wikipedia....erde_(landvorm)

The name 'wierde' is related to the word 'waard' in the meaning of 'piece of land surrounded by water' or 'land outside a dike'. You see it again in for instance 'uiterwaard'. The word is not related to the verb "werpen" (throw, cast shed, drop); so it's not a raised mound (see -werf). The word 'wierde' that's being used in Groningen is close to the the original word 'wurth, of which the suffix -werd or -ward has been derived.

The name 'wierde' is found especially in the Dutch province of Groningen. In Friesland it's called 'terp'. This Frisian word, which really means village, is now commonly used, although also in Friesland quite a few place names end in -werd. In north Germany such a mound is called 'Warft', in Denmark they are called 'vaerfter'. On the (former) island of Marken such a mound is called 'werf'.

Derivatives of the word 'wierde' show up in place names, for example in the already mentioned Sauwerd, Rasquert, Warffum and Usquert, but also in Aduard and Leeuwarden and in the German municipality of Krummhörn you have place names like Loquard, Upleward, Visquard en Woquard.

So a wierde IS an artificial mound, but the name is etymologically not related to anything raised or built. Instead it is related to a word meaning 'land surrounded by water'.

.

Interesting.

The word is therp used in the OLB. This word is in the Frisian dictionary. It says see THORP.

thor-p

11, ther-p, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. »Terpe«, Dorf, Brache; ne. village,

cleared land (N.); ÜG.: lat. vÆlla L 20; Hw.: vgl. got. þaúrp*, an. þorp (1), ae.

þorp, as. tharp*, thorp*,

The name 'wierde' is found especially in the Dutch province of Groningen. In Friesland it's called 'terp'. This Frisian word, which really means village, is now commonly used, although also in Friesland quite a few place names end in -werd. In north Germany such a mound is called 'Warft', in Denmark they are called 'vaerfter'. On the (former) island of Marken such a mound is called 'werf'.

This FRISIAN word, which really means VILLAGE - that is therp, thorp, terp.

Build a therp - build a terp or a village on Texland, they built the citadel, created a therp, town of sorts.

Built a mound, a village, a home - a home is on the mound, of which therp has been translated.

Mound is only really therp/terp in the context of the mound was a village. ie; had a building I guess, ie; citadel.

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Just for the record, I think all these references that contain WRDA or WERD are related to ward. Wardia - defend, keep. ie; build walls. That is why Lindwerd is so called, it's inside the walls.

Min tât heth skrêven ho tha Linda-wrda aend tha Ljudgârdne vrdilgen send. Lindahêm is jeta wêi, tha Linda-wrda far en dêl, tha northlikka Ljudgârdne send thrvch thene salta sê bidelven. That brûwsende hef slikt an tha hringdik thêre burch. Lik tât melth heth, sâ send tha hâvalâsa maenniska to gvngen aend hâvon hûskes bvwad binna tha hringdik thêra burch. Thêrvmbe is thaet ronddêl nw Ljvdwerd hêten. Tha stjurar segath Ljvwrd, men thaet is wansprêke.

As my father has mentioned, the people, being deprived of their harbour, went away and built houses inside the ramparts of the citadel; therefore that bastion is called Lindwerd.

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What the f is this? The Twilight Zone? I did read your post Otharus, and it was funny. And no, we are not married, lol.

OK, back to business.

Somewhere in the beginning of this thread (2 years ago, see part -1-) we shortly discussed the

meaning/origin of the name "Fries" (Frisian). Well, the most common (but still quite stupid) etymologies

suggest it means 'curly', or 'cool' (ie not warm).

Now we all know that the OLB talks quite a lot about the Fryans (let's say, the proto-Frisians), and from

standard (Frisian) history it is known the Frisians sailed (and settled) far and wide, and they very

probably have inspired the Vikings ages later.

So, the connection between 'Fries'/Frisian and sailing seems obvious, but I really never thought to

connect the two etymologically.....

Well, someone did:

Dutch:

bron: Nieuw Letterkundig Magazijn. Jaargang 14. Maatschappij der Nederlandse Letterkunde, Leiden 1996

Montse (de Haan) Hettema (1796-1873)

(...)

Onbedoeld komisch zijn af en toe de etymologische afleidingen die Hettema ten beste gaf - ooit gedacht

dat Friesland komt van fris (dat wil zeggen: nieuw) land, terwijl de Friezen daarentegen zo heten omdat

zij in oorsprong varenden waren?

(...)

Klaas van der Hoek

http://www.dbnl.org/...601_01_0007.php

English:

source: New Literary Magazine. Volume 14. Society of Dutch Literature, Leiden 1996

Montse (de Haan) Hettema (1796-1873)

(...)

Occasionally the etymological derivations Hettema gave at best were unintentionally comical - ever

thought that "Friesland" comes from fresh (ie new) land, while the Frisians on the other hand were so

called because they originally were sea-farers?

(...)

Klaas van der Hoek

++++++++

EDIT: I don't know, but I think a bit more than just Otharus' post got deleted....

.

The OLB seems to indicate that Friso is the namesake behind the word Friesland, (he was busy establishing his kingdom) imo, this is verified in the Frisian Dictionary. Before the name of Friso, the Frisians are only called Fryans in the OLB text. (Before NOW I WILL WRITE ABOUT FRISO) The only etymology of Frisia may be the name of Friso.

http://www.koeblergerhard.de/germanistischewoerterbuecher/altfriesischeswoerterbuch/afries-F.pdf

FrÐs-a

1 und häufiger?, FrÆs-a, afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Friese; ne. Frisian (M.);

ÜG.: lat. FrÆso

FrÐs-lan-d

1 und häufiger?, FrÐs-lon-d, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Friesland; ne.

Frisian (N.); E.: s. FrÐs-a, lan-d; L.: Hh 31b

The word has a dash over the e - making it sound like FREEsland, the ie we write now is only a change from the original long e sound, used by the Fryans.

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The OLB seems to indicate that Friso is the namesake behind the word Friesland, (he was busy establishing his kingdom) imo, this is verified in the Frisian Dictionary. Before the name of Friso, the Frisians are only called Fryans in the OLB text. (Before NOW I WILL WRITE ABOUT FRISO) The only etymology of Frisia may be the name of Friso.

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-F.pdf

FrÐs-a

1 und häufiger?, FrÆs-a, afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Friese; ne. Frisian (M.);

ÜG.: lat. FrÆso

FrÐs-lan-d

1 und häufiger?, FrÐs-lon-d, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Friesland; ne.

Frisian (N.); E.: s. FrÐs-a, lan-d; L.: Hh 31b

The word has a dash over the e - making it sound like FREEsland, the ie we write now is only a change from the original long e sound, used by the Fryans.

FREEsland you say.

The OLB suggests FRYA's land. Pronounced like FREE- AH's land.

I had hoped someone - you? - had a source for what this 'Klaas van der Hoek' claimed.

I never thought of it, and it sounds really good.

Frisar.. Farers.

It should make feel Alewyn happy with his theory about the Faroer.

But alas, Faroer means something totally different.

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Yeah, where did his post go?

I tell ya, I'm glad Abe is here for me to banter this with, my family have no interest in discussing the word 'ward' with me for 2 hours....

I really don't know where his post went. And a couple of yours went too.

His post was totally harmless, he just said something like, 'the two of you sound like a married couple, LOL'.

OK, forget it, someone wanted to 'clean up' this thread and became a bit overly enthousiastic.

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I really don't know where his post went. And a couple of yours went too.

His post was totally harmless, he just said something like, 'the two of you sound like a married couple, LOL'.

OK, forget it, someone wanted to 'clean up' this thread and became a bit overly enthousiastic.

Yeah, I saw it before I came back and shut my computer down last night. Maybe someone that enthusiastic can come and clean my place up..

I don't say it means FREE land, just that the original word was Friso, pronounced Freeso, so it became Friesland, once the ee or long e, became ie.

The Frisian etymology says it's related to Friso.

Here it says Fryasland: Nw wilde Friso mith alleman nêi Fryasland fâra,

The etymology suggests from Friso. Friesland and Frisia may have different roots even. Now that I think more, Friesland may come from Fryasland, but Frisia might come from the name of Friso.

It might be a co-incidence it was once Fryasland and someone called Friso came and it got named Frisia after his kingdom.

I will check it out more.

Edited by The Puzzler
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FREEsland you say.

The OLB suggests FRYA's land. Pronounced like FREE- AH's land.

I had hoped someone - you? - had a source for what this 'Klaas van der Hoek' claimed.

I never thought of it, and it sounds really good.

Frisar.. Farers.

It should make feel Alewyn happy with his theory about the Faroer.

But alas, Faroer means something totally different.

If you can make Friesland or Frisian from FARA - but I think it doesn't seem right.

fare (v.) dictionary.gif O.E. faran "to journey, set forth, go, travel, wander, get on, undergo, make one's way," from P.Gmc. *faranan (cf. O.S., O.H.G., Goth. faran, O.N., O.Fris. fara, Du. varen, Ger. fahren), from PIE *por- "going, passage," from root *per- "to lead, pass over" (see port (1)). Related: Fared; faring. http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=fare

far-a

(1) 80 und häufiger?, afries., st. V. (6): nhd. fahren, ziehen, gehen, reisen,

verfahren (V.), angreifen, überziehen; ne. go (V.), travel (V.), attack (V.); ÜG.:

lat. dðcere K 10, L 3, L 5, pergere L 12, L 24, (removÐre) K 2, K 10, trõnsÆre L

2, L 3, proficÆsci K 10; Vw.: s. bi-*, ef-t-er-, for-*, for-th-*, in-*, mi-s-, of-, on-, tæ-,

up-, ur-, wi-ther-; Hw.: s. fel-d-far-a-nd, fer-a, fer-e; vgl. got. faran*, an. fara, ae.

faran, anfrk. faran, as. faran, ahd. faran (1); Q.: S, B, R, E, H, W, K 2, K 10, L 2,

L 3, L 5, L 12, L 24; E.: germ. *faran, st. V., fahren; idg. *per- (2B), *perý-, V.,

hinüberführen, hinüberbringen, übersetzen (V.) (1), durchdringen, fliegen, Pokorny

816; W.: nfries. ferren, V., fahren; W.: saterl. fera, V., fahren; L.: Hh 24b, Rh

727b; R.: a-wei far-a, afries., V.: nhd. wegfahren; ne. drive (V.) away; L.: Rh 616a

*far-a

(2), afries., sw. M. (n): nhd. Fahrer, Pilger; ne. traveller, pilgrim; Vw.: s.

Rðm-; Hw.: vgl. ae. *fara (2), as. *faro (2)?, ahd. *faro (2)?; E.: germ. *faræ-,

*faræn, *fara-, *faran, sw. M. (n), Fahrer; s. idg. *per- (2B), *perý-, V.,

hinüberführen, hinüberbringen, übersetzen (V.) (1), durchdringen, fliegen, Pokorny

816; L.: Hh 24b, Rh 728b

Edited by The Puzzler
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The word used in Friday is fria, long i. Like Frya, Fria, same word - Frya's name imo does mean Free, so if Friesland is Fryasland, its the original land of the free. (I know, this editing sucks big time). If Frisia is a short version of that Frisia still means land of the free - but if Frisia is actually a derivation of Friso, it may be something else, depending on what Friso means.

frÆ-a

8, frÆ-a-ia, afries., sw. V. (1): nhd. befreien, frei machen, frei sprechen,

einlösen; ne. free (V.); ÜG.: lat. (lÆbertõs) K 7; Hw.: vgl. got. frijæn, an. fria, ae.

fríogan; Q.: B, E, K 7, AA 58; E.: germ. *frijæn, sw. V., befreien; s. idg. *prõi-,

*prýi-, *prÂ-, V., Adj., gern haben, schonen, lieben, friedlich, froh, Pokorny 844;

vgl. idg. *peri-, Adv., nahe, bei; L.: Hh 32a, Rh 764b, AA 58

frÆ-a-dei

12, frÆ-en-dei, frÐ-dei, fre-dî, frÆ-g-en-dei, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Freitag;

ne. Friday; Hw.: vgl. an. frjõdagr, ae. FrÆandÏg, ahd. frÆatag*; Q.: W, Schw; E.: s.

frÆ, dei; W.: nfries. freed; W.: saterl. frejendej; W.: nnordfries. freydi; L.: Hh 32a,

Rh 765a

---------------------------

Actually, if it's Fryslan it's probably still relative to Fryasland.

Edited by The Puzzler
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The Dutch word was "varende" . And a bit less correct Dutch would be "vaarder" or even "varer". But all meaning, 'someone who fares (on the sea)'.

A 'farer'. Or in old Frisian: "farar".

Now that's close to Faroer, right?

And no, you can't make Friesland out of that, and that is what this Klaas van der Hoek tried to say.

But what I wanted to know is: where, what source, did Klaas van der Hoek get his idea from? I never heard of that etymology he suggested for the name "Fries" (Frisian) before.

Edited by Abramelin
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someone wanted to 'clean up' this thread and became a bit overly enthousiastic.

I asked for it to be removed.

Edited by Otharus
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The Dutch word was "varende" . And a bit less correct Dutch would be "vaarder" or even "varer". But all meaning, 'someone who fares (on the sea)'.

A 'farer'. Or in old Frisian: "farar".

Now that's close to Faroer, right?

And no, you can't make Friesland out of that, and that is what this Klaas van der Hoek tried to say.

But what I wanted to know is: where, what source, did Klaas van der Hoek get his idea from? I never heard of that etymology he suggested for the name "Fries" (Frisian) before.

Yes, it's close to Faroe and probably what it means, like the island of Farö, Swedish meaning - but I still don't think it's related to Fryan or Frisian or anything to do with Friesland.

The name "Fårö" (in Gutnish "Faroy") is derived from the words "ö", meaning island, and "får-", which is a word associated with travel like in the Swedish word "färled" (fairway). The word Fårö probably means the island you have to travel to or the traveler's island. Mainland Swedes might misinterpret the name Fårö to be derived from får, the Swedish word for sheep, due to the many sheep on the island. However, the Gutnish word for sheep is "lamm" (similar to the Swedish word "lamm", meaning "lamb").

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%A5r%C3%B6

I asked for it to be removed.

I thought it was funny.

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But what I wanted to know is: where, what source, did Klaas van der Hoek get his idea from? I never heard of that etymology he suggested for the name "Fries" (Frisian) before.

He probably just thought it up.

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Faro is o meaning island and far- "which is a word associated with travel".

far-a

(1) 80 und häufiger?, afries., st. V. (6): nhd. fahren, ziehen, gehen, reisen,

verfahren (V.), angreifen, überziehen; ne. go (V.), travel (V.), attack (V.);

Faroe Islands are supposedly named after sheep - but recall what it said about Faro (co-incidently) "Mainland Swedes might misinterpret the name Fårö to be derived from får, the Swedish word for sheep, due to the many sheep on the island."

Faroe Islands, and the name Faeroe is thought to mean Sheep Islands. According to this, the first settlers in the Faroe Islands were Irish monks, who introduced sheep and oats to the Faroe Isles. Recent pollen analysis showing that oats were grown in the Faroes about the year 650 A.D supports this theory.

The Faroese ethnic group is of primarily Norse Viking descent and Scottish.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Faroe_Islands

If the Faroe Islands were named by Frisians it should probably relate to same as Faro, from far- (Frisian far-a), above Frisian etymology (go, travel), if not, it might mean something else, like sheep.

----------------------------------------------

EDIT: I missed this part which sounds like what I said is possible.

The name of the islands is first recorded on the Hereford map (1280), where they are labelled farei. The name has been explained as derived from a Celtic term for "far islands"[by whom?], but in popular etymology it has long been understood as based on Old Norse fár "livestock", thus fær-øer "sheep islands".

http://en.wikipedia....e_Faroe_Islands

Edited by The Puzzler
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He probably just thought it up.

Yeah, I am beginning to think that too.

He must've thought, "If Hettema can make up a ridiculous etymology for the name Fries, then so can I".

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You use the English name for the Faeroer, and that's Faroe. We here use the name that is almost the same as the people on those islands use themselves, with the ending -R- .

http://nl.wikipedia....g/wiki/Faeröer

If I have to believe this Wiki, then Faeroer could mean something else:

Gaelic hermits and monks from a Hiberno-Scottish mission settled Faroes in the 6th century, introducing the early Irish language. Saint Brendan, an Irish monastic saint who lived around 484–578, visited the Faroe Islands on two or three occasions (512–530). He named two of the islands Sheep Island and Paradise Island of Birds.

The old Gaelic name for the Faroe Islands, Na Scigirí, means the Skeggjar and probably refers to the Eyja-Skeggjar (Island-Beards), a nickname given to the island dwellers. The aforementioned theories are speculative and are not supported by archeological evidence.

http://en.wikipedia....i/Faroe_Islands

So, if true, only one of the islands of the Faeroer was called 'Sheep Island'.

=

This is nice:

Swedish:

sjöfarare = seafarer, navigator, voyager

sjöfarare ö = mariner island

sjöfarare öar = mariner islands

Well, that is as far as I have to believe Google Translator, lol. But it does sound plausible as a name for that remote group of islands.

sjöfarare öar >> farare öar >> faeroer

That 'hobby' of yours is like a virus, Puzz. LOL.

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Edited by Abramelin
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Yes, it's close to Faroe and probably what it means, like the island of Farö, Swedish meaning - but I still don't think it's related to Fryan or Frisian or anything to do with Friesland.

The name "Fårö" (in Gutnish "Faroy") is derived from the words "ö", meaning island, and "får-", which is a word associated with travel like in the Swedish word "färled" (fairway). The word Fårö probably means the island you have to travel to or the traveler's island. Mainland Swedes might misinterpret the name Fårö to be derived from får, the Swedish word for sheep, due to the many sheep on the island. However, the Gutnish word for sheep is "lamm" (similar to the Swedish word "lamm", meaning "lamb").

http://en.wikipedia....org/wiki/Fårö

We know that "eiland/eland" etc is the (old) Frisian word for island. Then I thought, 'what does "ei" mean in old Frisian?"

Heh, it means.....(female) sheep. In Dutch a female sheep is still called "ooi".

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-E.pdf

So, no, the Faeroer very probably did not get their name from the Frisians.

Personally I think that Faeroer , the "Mariner Islands", were named by the Swedes, and I'm quite sure of it after I read your quote from Wiki about Fårö (which I only read after I was done playing with Google Translator, sorry).

+++++

EDIT:

I thought I was being original, lol. But no, there actually ARE Mariner Islands... off the coast of Antarctica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariner_Islands

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Edited by Abramelin
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OK, back to 'waard', 'wierde', 'ward' or 'oord' as explanation for the -wrda ending of the OLB Linda-warda.

Ottema translated the name into "Linda-oorden" ( -oorden is the plural of -oord ).

By coincidence I found this:

De naam Oerd is afkomstig van een verdronken dorp wat ooit op die plek gelegen heeft.

The name Oerd comes from a drowned village that was once located on that spot.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Het_Oerd_(natuurgebied)

Ameland is uit het westen gerekend het vierde bewoonde waddeneiland. Het eiland bestaat uit vier dorpen: Hollum, Nes, Buren en Ballum. Vroeger waren er nog twee dorpen, Oerd en Sier genaamd, maar deze zijn bij stormen "verdronken" en liggen nu in de zee.

Reckoned from the west, Ameland is the fourth inhabited Wadden island. The island has four villages: Hollum, Nes, Nes and Buren. Previously there were two more villages, named Sier and Oerd, but these got "drowned" during storms and are now in the sea.

http://www.amelander.com/Ameland.html

or-d 14, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Spitze, Ort, Stelle, Anfang; ne. point (N.), place

(N.); ÜG.: lat. lancea WE; Vw.: s. -ling; Hw.: vgl. got. *uzds, an. oddr, ae. ord, as.

ord*, ahd. ort (1); Q.: H, E, W, R, WE; E.: s. germ. *uzda-, *uzdaz, st. M. (a),

Spitze; vgl. idg. *øes- (4), V., stechen?, Pokorny 1172; idg. *dhÐ- (2), *dheh1-, V.,

setzen, stellen, legen, Pokorny 235; W.: nfries. oerde; W.: nnordfries. od; L.: Hh

80b, Rh 970a.

http://www.koeblergerhard.de/germanistischewoerterbuecher/altfriesischeswoerterbuch/afries-O.pdf

Het uiterste punt of het uiteinde van iets, kant, rand. Kil. oort, ora, extremitas, extremum

de spits of punt, het scherp van een wapen

“het ééne eindpunt”

Hoek, de ruimte binnen een hoek

stuk, deel is die van het vierde deel van iets

vierdeel, quartier, quarta pars

kwartier, d. i. verblijfplaats, woonplaats

The farthest point or the end of something, face, edge. Kil. oort, ora, extremity, extremum

the tip or point, the sharp edge of a weapon

"the one end"

Angle, the space within an angle

piece, fourth part of something

quarter, quartier, quarta pars

quarter, ie residence, domicile

http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article_content&wdb=MNW&id=40096

1225035080_original_2.jpg

Trelleborg_319165c.jpg

schouwen-4.jpg

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In the old days cities were often divided into 4 quarters or districts, and this division was also used for larger areas of land: the north, east, south, and west part, or the north-east, north-west, south-east and south-west part.

"Oord" also had to do with "outer end of something", or "at the edge of something", so I assume the Linden-oorden were an area (with linden/lime trees) outside the citadel/city on Texland. Maybe the Kreiler forest that's now on the bottom of the Wadden Sea between the isle of Texel and Friesland??

=

From what I read here and there, the idea came from splitting up a coin into 4 parts, and such a part was once called 'oort' or (dimunative) 'oortje' in Dutch.

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Edited by Abramelin
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To all,

I have been wanting to congratulate you for a wonderful job done over a very dangerous and controversial subject. I hope nobody will ever connect me with anything (if you know what i am saying).

Never actually read the book, although i am aware that matriarchalism, mythology and religion, among other subjects, are strong ideas found in the manuscript.

My opinion regarding the origin of the word “Frisia” is that there is obviously a clear connection between the names Freyja and Frisia:

Freya (Freyja): Goddess of love and beauty; sister of Frey; originally one of Vanir.

Freya, Freja, Freyia, Frøya, and Freia.

Read more: Norse Mythology Glossary, Dictionary - Characters from Stories, Legends - Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0197623.html#ixzz1zHCQE6vt

Regards,

Mario Dantas

Edited by Mario Dantas
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Thanks Mario. Yes, I think every participant of this thread is not averse of dealing with something controversial or we wouldn't have 'lasted' for almost 830 pages in total.

And yes, what you suggested about the origin of the name 'Frisia' (Freyja/Frya)is one of the most obvious when reading the OLB: it was their 'Earth Mother'.

You can read it here, btw: http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

But when you look at other sources, it's not that obvious at all. Even Frisian historiographers of centuries ago mention a whole Frisian pantheon, and Freyja/Frya was only one member of that pantheon.

FRISIAN_GODS-HAMCONIUS.jpg

According to Martinus Hamconius (1550-1620) :

Stauo/Stavo > Jupiter

VVarns > Mercurius

Fosta > Mars (think 'fist')

Snein > Sol (the Sun)

Harco > Hercules

Holler > Pluto

Freda > Venus (>>> Freyja/Frya)

VValdach > Diana

Meda > Medea

.

Edited by Abramelin
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