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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


Abramelin
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.

From what I learned, the language from the OLB is most certainly not older than the first dictionary.

Read my post (#142) about the genitive "HIS".

.

Firstly, I don't think it would need to be queen'r - it's would be queen's - as in the queen, hers children - because in fact, his imo, is also a plural, he is one - his is hims or then you have his could be he is. Why they are looking for queen'r is beyond me. Queen's is sufficiently the word that could be used. Plural is 'his and hers' - not his and her - there is no way an r would be at the end of queen as in queen'r as a plural equal to kings (king his) it would be queens (queen hers) - even though that sounds odd now - that's why they can't find queen'r - how ridiculous.

and that's just that part and even I can see how obvious it is that his would have been the word that equates to -is is his, whether that be a folk etymology - I don't know, maybe the folk etymology is actually the correct and older etymology - which is what often seems to be the case - folk etymologies are way underestimated imo.

Edited by The Puzzler
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With all the other innuendo towards these regular people being Gods and Goddesses, I'm wondering if Jon is actually Jove, Jon is said to mean given, which is written jêva. For the name Jove to be Jupiter, one would think the V became an F/ph sound - that became p - Neptune would appear to be the same - a change from an F sound - neph/nef to nep.

Jupiter really does seem to fit the bill as a giving God, the God given, given by God, that is Jove, what else would Jove mean?

given dictionary.gif pp. adj., late 14c., "allotted, predestined," from give; also with a noun sense of "fate," reflecting an important concept in pagan Germanic ideology (O.E. had giefeðe in this sense). http://www.etymonlin....php?term=given

Note in jova below, you have the same jef sound as gief O.E above. It's all part of the words for gift, given - how obvious a name for the God who supported them, gave them his support.

The Romans believed that Jupiter granted them supremacy because they had honored him more than any other people had. Jupiter was "the fount of the auspices upon which the relationship of the city with the gods rested."

That was Jove's gift to them, for their high honours of him.

Jon himself might not be exactly Jove but the name is the same imo if nothing else.

j-ov-a

(1), afries., Konj.: Vw.: s. j-ef-tha

jef-t

* (4), afries., F.: Vw.: s. jef

jef-t-e

34, jef-t (1), afries., M., F.: nhd. Gabe, Verleihung; ne. gift, donation; Vw.:

s. bi-, hand-, liõf-, ur-; Hw.: s. jef (1); vgl. an. gipt, ae. gift, as. gift, ahd. gift; Q.:

B, E, H, W, R; E.: s. jev-a (2); W.: nfries. jefte; L.: Hh 52b, Rh 839a

*jef-t-ich

, afries., Adj.: Vw.: s. fle-t-t-, hand-, ðt-; E.: s. jev-e, *-ich; L.: Hh 52b,

Rh 840a

*jef-t-nisse

, afries., st. F. (jæ): Vw.: s. ur-; E.: s. jev-a (2); L.: AA 122

j-ef-tha

132, j-ef-t (2), j-ef (3), j-ef-a, j-ev-a (1), j-of-tha, j-of-t, j-of (2), j-ov-a (1),

of-tha, of-ta

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-J.pdf

Edited by The Puzzler
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Firstly, I don't think it would need to be queen'r - it's would be queen's - as in the queen, hers children - because in fact, his imo, is also a plural, he is one - his is hims or then you have his could be he is. Why they are looking for queen'r is beyond me. Queen's is sufficiently the word that could be used. Plural is 'his and hers' - not his and her - there is no way an r would be at the end of queen as in queen'r as a plural equal to kings (king his) it would be queens (queen hers) - even though that sounds odd now - that's why they can't find queen'r - how ridiculous.

and that's just that part and even I can see how obvious it is that his would have been the word that equates to -is is his, whether that be a folk etymology - I don't know, maybe the folk etymology is actually the correct and older etymology - which is what often seems to be the case - folk etymologies are way underestimated imo.

That 'folk etymology' showed up later. In Old English that is.

The earlier forms were -es / -is / -as.

It would be interesting to see for ourselves what form is being used in the Beowulf text.

++++++++

EDIT:

OK, so I did.

Few examples:

33

ísig ond útfús æþelinges fær·

icy and keen to sail, a hero's vessel;

63

Heaðo-Scilfingas healsgebedda.

the War-Scylfing's belovèd embraced in bed.

189

Swá ðá maélceare maga Healfdenes

So then over the sorrow of the time the son of Half-Dane

194

Þæt fram hám gefrægn Higeláces þegn

That from home heard Hygelac's thane

http://www.heorot.dk...-rede-text.html

It survives in a single manuscript known as the Nowell Codex. Its composition by an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet is dated between the 8th and the early 11th century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beowulf

Only -es and -as, but no -his to be found.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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About Jon/Jove/given:

I prefer this:

Jove

Roman god of the bright sky, late 14c., from L. Iovis, from PIE *dyeu- "to shine," with derivatives referring to the sky, heavens, a god (see diurnal, and cf. Zeus). In classical Latin, the compound Iuppiter replaced Old L. Iovis as the god's name.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=jove&searchmode=none

Zeus

supreme god of the ancient Greeks, 1706, from Gk., from PIE *dewos- "god" (cf. L. deus "god," O. Pers. daiva- "demon, evil god," O.C.S. deivai, Skt. deva-), from root *dyeu- "to gleam, to shine;" also the root of words for "sky" and "day" (see diurnal). The god-sense is originally "shining," but "whether as originally sun-god or as lightener" is not now clear.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Zeus&allowed_in_frame=0

I'd say Jupiter is a composition of two words: Zeus-Pater or Jovis-Pater where 'pater' means father.

Not that strange when you think of the Christian expression "God the Father".

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Btw, if you read my edit in the post with the lines from the Beowulf text, you'll see they've translated "æþeling" with "hero".

The OLB talks about the "Book of the Adellinga/Adelinga" and from the text we know it should be the Book of Adela's Followers".

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It appears I was wrong: I had forgotten about an even older English MS: the Anglo Saxon Chronicle.

The Winchester (or Parker) Chronicle is the oldest manuscript of the Chronicle that survives. It was begun at Old Minster, Winchester, towards the end of Alfred's reign. The manuscript begins with a genealogy of Alfred, and the first chronicle entry is for the year 60 BC.[5] The section containing the Chronicle takes up folios 1–32.[12] Unlike the other manuscripts, [A] is of early enough composition to show entries dating back to the late 9th century in the hands of different scribes as the entries were made. The first scribe's hand is dateable to the late 9th or very early 10th century; his entries cease in late 891.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Saxon_Chronicle

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Parker MS; Corpus Christ College, Cambridge MS 173 ff. 1-32

Cynric his sunu

Seaxburg his cuen

Æþelwulf his sunu

Æþelbald his sunu

Aurelius his broðer

http://www8.georgetown.edu/departments/medieval/labyrinth/library/oe/texts/asc/a.html

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About Jon/Jove/given:

I prefer this:

Jove

Roman god of the bright sky, late 14c., from L. Iovis, from PIE *dyeu- "to shine," with derivatives referring to the sky, heavens, a god (see diurnal, and cf. Zeus). In classical Latin, the compound Iuppiter replaced Old L. Iovis as the god's name.

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

Zeus

supreme god of the ancient Greeks, 1706, from Gk., from PIE *dewos- "god" (cf. L. deus "god," O. Pers. daiva- "demon, evil god," O.C.S. deivai, Skt. deva-), from root *dyeu- "to gleam, to shine;" also the root of words for "sky" and "day" (see diurnal). The god-sense is originally "shining," but "whether as originally sun-god or as lightener" is not now clear.

http://www.etymonlin...owed_in_frame=0

I'd say Jupiter is a composition of two words: Zeus-Pater or Jovis-Pater where 'pater' means father.

Not that strange when you think of the Christian expression "God the Father".

dî is dei (day) in Old Frisian - this is nearly the root word itself - dîes - as in dees sound = day

This word imo is probably Zeus - shining, sky, day, bright - all those words.

I'm not sure that Jupiter/Iovis/Jove comes from the same root though, even though the vague (Latin Iovis from PIE dyeu) says so.

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Only -es and -as, but no -his to be found.

.

Where is an example in the original text OLB of this -his?

It's too late for me to look but if you know where one is, direct me please.

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Page 4 of Knuls photocopies - I see MEDEA_S_BLIK

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Page 4 of Knuls photocopies - I see MEDEA_S_BLIK

Yes, that is the short form for -HIS.

Btw, I will look up those -HIS examples in the OLB.

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Yes, that is the short form for -HIS.

Btw, I will look up those -HIS examples in the OLB.

Medea his Blik? - it would be 'Medea hers blik' if anything - that S denotes hers in that word imo. Medea's blik.

OK, do that, I'd be interested, I'll probably check them out tomorrow now.

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Medea his Blik? - it would be 'Medea hers blik' if anything - that S denotes hers in that word imo. Medea's blik.

OK, do that, I'd be interested, I'll probably check them out tomorrow now.

No, -HIS is used everywhere.

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

Enoch, Dywcke’s husband; Grevetman over Westflyland and Texel.

Thaet was Frya his dêi aend to thêre stonde was et vrlêden sjvgun wâra sjvgun jêr, thaet Faesta was anstaeld as folksmoder nêi Fryas jêrta.

It was Frya’s day, and seven times seven years had elapsed since Festa was appointed Volksmoeder by the desire of Frya.

That is nêi Frya-his tex aend-et skolde vnrjucht wêsa to vnthandana that.

This is Frya’s Tex, and it would be unjust to act contrary to it.

Thâ wrdon kraefta sâmlath, thri pêlun fon Godahis burch wrdon hja wither stonden, tha orloch bilêv.

Then all the forces were assembled, and three hours from Godasburgt they were withstood, but war continued.

Thêrthrvch wêron thêr fêlo maenniska fon-t Findas land nêi vsa hêinde aend fêre Krêkalanda kvmen aend âk fêlo fon Lyda-his land.

(Sandbach gives a crap translation. Other time better, lol).

As hja thêran nw en nôme jêva wilde, wrdon hja vnênes, svme wild-et Fryasburch hêta, ôra Nêf tünia, men tha Mâgjara aend tha Finna bâdon thaet skolde Thyrhisburch hête.

Then they wanted to give it a name, but disagreed about it. Some wanted to call it Fryasburgt, others Neeftunia; but the Magyars and Finns begged that it might be called Thyr's burgt.

Hi stêk thus mith sinum flâte nêi Lydia, thaet is Lyda his lând, thêr wildon tha swarta maenniska fâta hjam aend êta.

(Another incomplete translation by Sandbach).

Fon uta litha êlanda gvng-er ut wrêka tha Thyrjar skêpa aend landa birâwa, thêrvmbe send tha êlanda evin blyd Râwer êlanda, as Jonhis êlanda hêten.

From the smaller islands he made expeditions for vengeance on the Tyrians, and plundered their ships and their lands. Therefore these islands were called Insulæ Piratarum, as well as Jon's Islands.

Thêrumbe kêron wi Gêrt Pire his toghater to vsa Moder ut.

(Another wrong translation by Sandbach)

And so on.

+++

EDIT:

I again noticed Sandbach is not too averse of making 'free interpretations' or to simply leave out parts of the original text, aside from being plain wrong.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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You still there, Puzz? Refresh the page.

I will check if -HIS is being used for both genders in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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I'm nearly asleep but I'll explain the first one imo, read the original: http://www.rodinbook.nl/olbscans.html

Frisian Dictionary - this word is hîskithe - note hîs prefix

hÆ-sk-ith-e

1, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Hausgenossenschaft; ne. houshold; Hw.: s.

hi-æn-a; vgl. an. h‘ski, ae. hÆwisc, anfrk. hÆwiski, as. hÆwiski*, ahd. hÆwiski*; Q.: B;

E.: s. germ. *hÆwiska-, *hÆwiskam, *hÆwiskja-, *hÆwiskjam, st. N. (a),

Hausgemeinschaft, Familie; vgl. idg. *¨ei- (1), V., Sb., Adj., liegen, Lager,

vertraut, Pokorny 539; W.: nnordfries. hiske; L.: Hh 44b, Rh 818a

Look at your translation:

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

Enoch, Dywcke’s husband; Grevetman over Westflyland and Texel.

It makes no sense.

Enoch, Dywek HIS man - is Dywek a man, so Enoch is HIS man?

No, Enoch is Dyweks HUSBAND, this sentence of all the men is the only one who is married and uses husband in the sentence.

So, in that example - the his you see, which is also in the original DYWEK HIS MAN is not Dywek's man (Dywek his man) it's Dywek (I can't see the end of the word Dywek to see if an s is already there) but imo - this sentence says

Enoch, Dywek husband = Enoch Dywek his man.... A houseman is a husband originally.

---------------------------

OK, you do that - I must go now or I'll regret it in the morning. lol, as I always do.

________________________________

PS: What is a BLIK? I checked the Frisian dictionary - show, coin - MEDEAS something? Maybe someone could explain blik better to me in the form it might be used in Medeasblik.

Edited by The Puzzler
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"Enoch, Dywek's man" makes perfect sense to me.

It means Enoch ( a guy) is the 'man' (or husband) of a woman called Dywek.

Puz, the suffix -HIS is used for both women and men.

What is your problem with that?

In Dutch we still have a girl's name called "Dieuwertje"

Now change the -TJE- into -K-

You will get "Dieuwek" or "Dywek".

+++++

EDIT:

Dieuwertje is een Friese naam, met als betekenis "beschermer van het volk".

Dieuwertje is a Frisian name meaning "protector of the people".

http://www.babynaam....naam=Dieuwertje

DJUNA is een Friese verkorting van DIEUWERTJE, verkleinvorm van DIETWARDA.

DJUNA is a Frisan abbreviational form of DIEUWERTJE, a diminative form of DIETWARDA.

"DIET" = people, folk

"-WART" = protector, guardian.

http://www.heiligen....ABDIETWARDA.pdf

But personally, I think that explanation is wrong. The Frisians use -TJE- where the Dutch say -K- (TJERK / kerk / church).

It now - in modern Dutch - may look like a diminutive, but it's just the Frisian style of changing a -K- into a -TCH- or visa versa (that's for the English. the Dutch use -TSJ- or in English -TCH or -TSY- ).

And never forget: when you all read a Dutch/Frisian -J-, think -Y-

.

Edited by Abramelin
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(See underlined sentence in your post)

Yes, that's what I think it is.

Even in medieval times they read the works of Herodotes, Homer, Pliny, Strabo, Plato, Tacitus and who have we.

An example: if you read about Minno the Seaking in the OLB, it doesn't even look like much of a rewriting of what Herodotes (or Homer or Thucydides) wrote about Minos:

Minos appears in Greek literature as the king of Knossos as early as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.[13] Thucydides tells us Minos was the most ancient man known to build a navy.[14] He reigned over Crete and the islands of the Aegean Sea three generations before the Trojan War. He lived at Knossos for periods of nine years, where he received instruction from Zeus in the legislation which he gave to the island. He was the author of the Cretan constitution and the founder of its naval supremacy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minos

Compare:

FROM MINNO’S WRITINGS / LAWS FOR THE NAVIGATORS / USEFUL EXTRACTS FROM THE WRITINGS LEFT BY MINNO

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#al

.

Interesting to notice.

Minos, can be explained as from Scytisch language and descent.

Son of Europe.

Europe, meaning “Euver-Op”.

Describing the Scytisch transmigration “over” Berg-en-Dal, via Alpen (Al-Op’n) towards Italy . Becoming the Etruscen (Hetruria -> Het Ruer, Roer, daar roert iets), Tusci, Ombren and going further to Greece/Turkey.

Evenso crossing over the Pyrenees to Iberia (Euver/Uber).

Related with other mythic and Latinised figures which are actually general names for governing positions.

Minos

M’In-Hos

Dem-In-Hos (see ‘Dominos’ what the Romans made of it): Exalted position

Cfr:

D’Hohn –> Dun -> Dunum (Sand Hill)

Son of Jupiter

Jupiter: Die-Up: Highest

Saturnus: Sat-Uveren: Sitting Above

(see Dutch Overste, also Ogyges:Hogiche)

In that sense, Greek/Latin/Norse myths are indeed fabulous stories of a real history that is not well understood or even surpressed during time due to several reasons.

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And if there are any blanks left, I will publish a new 'ancient' manuscript.to fill them in.

You should try it.

You will learn that it is impossible even to make something half as good as OLB.

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From what I learned, the language from the OLB is most certainly not older than the first dictionary.

Appearantly you did not learn much.

If it is "most certain", please explain why.

That should be easy then.

In the following quotes, MÉID, MÉIDE, MÉIDUM is translated through the context.

I could not find a dictionary that has this word with a meaning like the ones used in the translations.

I suspect a relation to mead (Dutch: mede).

(Elsewhere in the OLB 'MÉID' means present/ gift. That meaning is listed in dictionaries, as well as various other meanings, but not 'tavern' or 'assembly'.)

[151/09] about Friso

KÉMON THA SINA KNAPA VPPA THÉRE MÉID

[Ottema p.205]

Kwamen dan zijne knapen op de gelagkamer

When his young men went to the tavern

[151/18] about Friso

ÀND VPPA THÉRE MÉID TÉRADON HJA ALON VNKVMMERLIK WÉI

[O+S p.205]

op de gelagkamer teerden zij steeds onbekommerd voort

they spent money carelessly in the taverns

[197/18] about Black Adel

IN STÉDE THAT HJA INVPPA THÉRE MÉIDE HWIP ÀND SWIK SPÉLE

[O+S p.237]

in stede dat zij op hun gezelschappen wip en zwik spelen

instead of playing games of swinging and wrestling

[sandbach didn't translate the underlined]

[202/25] about Black Adel

THES DÉIS KÉTHE HJU VPPA ALLE MARKUM ÀND BINNA ALLE MÉIDUM

[O+S p.243]

bij dag sprak zij op alle markten en in alle gezelschappen

by day she made speeches in all the markets and in all the assemblies

Edited by Otharus
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I think you have a keen sense for language Otharus.

Santé.

Dank U, wij verstaan elkaar.

Sanctvs.

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You should try it.

You will learn that it is impossible even to make something half as good as OLB.

I think Tolkien did quite well.

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Interesting to notice.

Minos, can be explained as from Scytisch language and descent.

Son of Europe.

Europe, meaning “Euver-Op”.

Describing the Scytisch transmigration “over” Berg-en-Dal, via Alpen (Al-Op’n) towards Italy . Becoming the Etruscen (Hetruria -> Het Ruer, Roer, daar roert iets), Tusci, Ombren and going further to Greece/Turkey.

Evenso crossing over the Pyrenees to Iberia (Euver/Uber).

Related with other mythic and Latinised figures which are actually general names for governing positions.

Minos

M’In-Hos

Dem-In-Hos (see ‘Dominos’ what the Romans made of it): Exalted position

Cfr:

D’Hohn –> Dun -> Dunum (Sand Hill)

Son of Jupiter

Jupiter: Die-Up: Highest

Saturnus: Sat-Uveren: Sitting Above

(see Dutch Overste, also Ogyges:Hogiche)

In that sense, Greek/Latin/Norse myths are indeed fabulous stories of a real history that is not well understood or even surpressed during time due to several reasons.

Had you not learned from the meaning of the Latin or Greek words first, you would not have been able to make any sense of these words using your 'etymology'.

SATURNUS: Zaad urn.

Lol.

,

Edited by Abramelin
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"Enoch, Dywek's man" makes perfect sense to me.

It means Enoch ( a guy) is the 'man' (or husband) of a woman called Dywek.

Puz, the suffix -HIS is used for both women and men.

What is your problem with that?

In Dutch we still have a girl's name called "Dieuwertje"

Now change the -TJE- into -K-

You will get "Dieuwek" or "Dywek".

+++++

EDIT:

Dieuwertje is een Friese naam, met als betekenis "beschermer van het volk".

Dieuwertje is a Frisian name meaning "protector of the people".

http://www.babynaam....naam=Dieuwertje

DJUNA is een Friese verkorting van DIEUWERTJE, verkleinvorm van DIETWARDA.

DJUNA is a Frisan abbreviational form of DIEUWERTJE, a diminative form of DIETWARDA.

"DIET" = people, folk

"-WART" = protector, guardian.

http://www.heiligen....ABDIETWARDA.pdf

But personally, I think that explanation is wrong. The Frisians use -TJE- where the Dutch say -K- (TJERK / kerk / church).

It now - in modern Dutch - may look like a diminutive, but it's just the Frisian style of changing a -K- into a -TCH- or visa versa (that's for the English. the Dutch use -TSJ- or in English -TCH or -TSY- ).

And never forget: when you all read a Dutch/Frisian -J-, think -Y-

.

Did you compare it to the original text - no one else has a 'his' man - they have an attached s on their name - their men are not their husbands,

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

Enoch, Dywcke’s husband; Grevetman over Westflyland and Texel.

You can't have both. The other names would say the same thing of their men, but they don't.

The second sentence has 2 forms of his - that is Dywecke's and hus - there is not 2 forms - the his is either for DyweckES or for HUS - not both.

No, his is not for her imo. Or it is not a word that means his or hers then in this sentence. Dywek's man, you think is Dyweck his man, so Dywek is a woman, yet they are saying Dywek HIS man, yeah right.

Funny how HUSband happens to be HIS and the word is in the sentence then.

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Had you not learned from the meaning of the Latin or Greek words first, you would not have been able to make any sense of these words using your 'etymology'.

SATURNUS: Zaad urn.

Lol.

,

Saturn is easy - sa-turn in Frisian - to turn - which is what Saturn is truly known for, the turning (of time). Cronus.

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Appearantly you did not learn much.

If it is "most certain", please explain why.

That should be easy then.

In the following quotes, MÉID, MÉIDE, MÉIDUM is translated through the context.

I could not find a dictionary that has this word with a meaning like the ones used in the translations.

I suspect a relation to mead (Dutch: mede).

(Elsewhere in the OLB 'MÉID' means present/ gift. That meaning is listed in dictionaries, as well as various other meanings, but not 'tavern' or 'assembly'.)

[151/09] about Friso

KÉMON THA SINA KNAPA VPPA THÉRE MÉID

[Ottema p.205]

Kwamen dan zijne knapen op de gelagkamer

When his young men went to the tavern

[151/18] about Friso

ÀND VPPA THÉRE MÉID TÉRADON HJA ALON VNKVMMERLIK WÉI

[O+S p.205]

op de gelagkamer teerden zij steeds onbekommerd voort

they spent money carelessly in the taverns

[197/18] about Black Adel

IN STÉDE THAT HJA INVPPA THÉRE MÉIDE HWIP ÀND SWIK SPÉLE

[O+S p.237]

in stede dat zij op hun gezelschappen wip en zwik spelen

instead of playing games of swinging and wrestling

[sandbach didn't translate the underlined]

[202/25] about Black Adel

THES DÉIS KÉTHE HJU VPPA ALLE MARKUM ÀND BINNA ALLE MÉIDUM

[O+S p.243]

bij dag sprak zij op alle markten en in alle gezelschappen

by day she made speeches in all the markets and in all the assemblies

Or Frisian mede - no need to go to Dutch.

med-e

(1) 3, afries., st. M. (u): nhd. Met; ne. mead; Hw.: vgl. got. *midus, an.

mj‡OEr, ae. medu, lat.-as.? medo*, ahd. metu*; Q.: H; E.: germ. *medu-, *meduz, st.

M. (u), Met, Honigwein; idg. *méd

hu, Adj., N., süß, Honig, Met, Pokorny 707; L.:

Hh 69b, Rh 917b

me-d-e

(2), afries., Adv.: Vw.: s. mi-th-i

mÐ-d-e

(1) 4, afries., st. F. (æ): nhd. Matte (F.) (2), Wiese; ne. meadow; Vw.: s.

dam-m-, -rÆ-th, -ske-t-t-inge, -wei; Hw.: vgl. ae. mÚd (1), mnd. mede, mhd. mõte;

Q.: B, E, Schw; E.: germ. *maþwæ, *madwæ, st. F. (æ), Matte (F.) (2), Wiese; s.

idg. *mÐ- (2), V., mähen, Pokorny 703; W.: nfries. miede; W.: nnordfries. maade;

L.: Hh 69b, Rh 917b

mÐd-e

(2) 15, mÆd-e, meid-e, afries., st. F. (æ): nhd. Miete (F.) (1), Pacht,

Geschenk; ne. rent (N.), gift;

--------

meid-e

, afries., F.: Vw.: s. mÐd-e (2)

meid-en

1 und häufiger?, afries., N.: nhd. Mädchen; ne. girl;

And the mêiden probably served the mede. Maiden is probably rooted in mede - the mead server. German women are very good beer servers, it's almost a stereotype, with the Beer Festivals and such.

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Throw in some meat with the beer.

“Ou meide onder die komberse” – lamb meat balls wrapped in cabbage leaves.

http://oncebitten.co.za/?page_id=409

met-e

6, afries., st. M. (i): nhd. Speise; ne. food; Vw.: s. -wer-d-elsa; Hw.: vgl. got.

mats, an. matr, ae. m’te, as. meti, ahd. mezzi (1); Q.: E, H, W; E.: germ. *mati-,

*matiz, st. M. (i), Speise; s. idg. *matja-, *matjam, st. N. (a), Speise; vgl. idg.

*mad-, Adj., V., nass, fett, triefen, Pokorny 694; W.: nnordfries. meet; L.: Hh 71b,

Rh 927a

Edited by The Puzzler
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