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Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]


Abramelin

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Maybe rather than tavern being connected to mêit, maybe the real word is meet as in meeting place. I've never heard a tavern called a meid or anything vaguely resembling it - but meeting might fit. Taverns themselves are meeting places.

...all markets and assemblies - all markets and meetings/meeting places

meet (v.) dictionary.gif O.E. metan, from P.Gmc. *motijanan (cf.O.N. mæta, O.S. motian "to meet"). Related to O.E. gemot "meeting." The noun, in the sporting sense, is attested from 1831, originally of hunting. meet (adj.) dictionary.gif O.E. gemæte "suitable, having the same dimensions," from P.Gmc. *ga-mætijaz (cf. O.N. mætr, O.H.G. gimagi, Ger. gemäß "suitable"), from collective prefix *ga- + PIE *med- "to measure"

http://www.etymonlin...x.php?term=meet

From PIE med - to measure

This imo would be the root of mead, measurements of honey etc.

I noticed it in Old Irish for mead and here you ask for a middy - that is a particular measurement of beer.

Frisian has met for measure. mêite sounds like metre or even meter.

me-t-a

17, afries., st. V. (5): nhd. messen; ne. measure (V.); ÜG.: lat.

(mÐnsðrõbilis) AB (82, 11); Vw.: s. bi-, thru-ch-, umbe-, ur-; Hw.: vgl. got. mitan*,

an. meta (2), ae. metan, anfrk. metan, as. *metan (1)?, ahd. mezzan* (1); Q.: B,

W, S, E, H, R, AB (82, 11); E.: germ. *metan, st. V., messen, zuteilen, erwägen;

idg. *med- (1), V., messen, Pokorny 705; idg. *met-, V., messen, Pokorny 703; s.

idg. *mÐ- (3), V., messen, Pokorny 703; W.: nnordfries. meete; L.: Hh 71b, Rh

-------------------------------------

All the way back to gift - give - mete out justice, which is to give a measurement equal to the crime in the punishment - all these words connect.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Saturn is easy - sa-turn in Frisian - to turn - which is what Saturn is truly known for, the turning (of time). Cronus.

Same answer to you as to Van Gorp.

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meit-ia, afries., sw. V. (2): Vw.: s. mak-ia

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-M.pdf

Lumka_makia >> Lumtja_meitja >> Lutkemute.

Lutkemute, a wrong spelling of "Lutke Munte", only on this map:

post-18246-0-58221000-1337560731_thumb.j

Just trying.

++++

EDIT:

Lutke Munte is echter de terp ten westen van het Kleine Diep (de voormalige Munte of Ae) terwijl Grote Munte de terp ten oosten van dat riviertje betrof.

However, Lutke Munte is a the terp (artificial mound) west of the "Kleine Diep" (the former small river Munte or Ae/Ee), while the "Grote Munte" is located east of that small river.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Termunten

.

Edited by Abramelin
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Same answer to you as to Van Gorp.

meit-ia, afries., sw. V. (2): Vw.: s. mak-ia

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-M.pdf

Lumka_makia >> Lumtja_meitja >> Lutkemute.

Lutkemute, a wrong spelling of "Lutke Munte", only on this map:

post-18246-0-58221000-1337560731_thumb.j

Just trying.

The connections are amazing and so varied - look at that - meite to make. Meet, join together is to make something, it never ends... meite could easily be meeting place, where things were made and you measured things out, to make them. To meet your maker, make a circle, to linger longer, it's almost like these phrases show us the meaning of the words.

I saw Leuke ma on an old map, I'll have a look at your map in a sec.

Oh yeah, I did see that one, near the Emden, but again, unless East Flyland can be near Emden, well...

(Maybe that area was an East Flyland...it's East and it's a flowland imo...just trying)

Edited by The Puzzler
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The more I do this, the more it seems that all root words for every other word is in Old Frisian and the various words and their meanings all relate to the Frisian root word.

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kwade sea or bad sea.

kw is qu then you find: - but look at the other words, mist, dirt to evil like ie; bad. If others actually named the Balda Sea, which in their language meant bad, or possibly bold, the term used when describing it is kwade, bad sea - which doesn't connect imo - to bold - but a bold sea, in terms of the sea being a person, was bad for being so bold to do that, act evil.

quõ-d

(1) 15, afries., Adj.: nhd. schlecht, böse, schadhaft; ne. bad (Adj.), defective;

Hw.: s. quõ-d-e-lik; Hw.: vgl. mnd. quad, mnl. qwaet; Q.: E, W, S; E.: germ.

*kwÐda-, *kwÐdaz, *kwÚda-, *kwÚdaz, Adj., schlecht, hässlich, böse; s. idg.

*gÝÐud

h-, *gÝÐdh-, *gÝýudh-, *gÝæudh-, *gÝædh-, *gÝðdh-, Sb., Mist, Kot, Ekel,

Ungeziefer, Pokorny 484; vgl. idg. *gÝæu-, *gÝð-, Sb., Mist, Kot, Ekel, Ungeziefer,

Pokorny 483; W.: nfries. quae, Adj., schlecht, böse; W.: quaad, Adj., schlecht, böse;

L.: Hh 84b, Rh 882a

quõ-d

(2) 1 und häufiger?, afries., st. N. (a): nhd. Schlechtes, Übel, Kot, Mist; ne.

evil (N.), dirt (N.); Hw.: vgl. ae. cwéad, ahd. kwõt* (1); Q.: E; E.: germ. *kwÐda-,

*kwÐdam, *kwÚda-, *kwÚdam, st. N. (a), Kot; idg. *gÝÐud

h-, *gÝÐdh-, *gÝýudh-,

*gÝæud

h-, *gÝædh-, *gÝðdh-, Sb., Mist, Kot, Ekel, Ungeziefer, Pokorny 484; s. idg.

*gÝæu-, *gÝð-, Sb., Mist, Kot, Ekel, Ungeziefer, Pokorny 483; L.: Hh 84b, Hh 170

quõ-d-e-lik

4, afries., Adj.: nhd. übel, schlecht, arg; ne. evil (Adj.); Q.: S, W; E.: s.

quõ-d, -lik (3); W.: nfries. quaelck, Adj., übel, schlecht; L.: Hh 84b, Rh 882a

quõ-d-hê-d

8, afries., st. F. (i): nhd. Schlechtigkeit; ne. evil (N.); Hw.: vgl. mnd.

quâthêit, mnl. quaetheit, mhd. quâtheit; Q.: W, AA 189; E.: s. quõ-d (1), *hê-d; L.:

Hh 84b, Rh 882a, AA 189

quõ-d-ie-r

? 1 und häufiger?, afries., Sb.: nhd. böser Geist, Teufel; ne. evil spirit,

devil; Hw.: s. quõ-d (1)?; s. quõ-d (1)?, diõ-r?; L.: Hh 145b

------------------------

Before all those words is qûa - the root word - which says see quetha

queth-a

40 und häufiger?, qua, afries., st. V. (5): nhd. sagen, sprechen, bedeuten;

ÜG.: lat. dÆcere

Apparently means speak - maybe to quote and dictate (dicere).

But above that is:

quet-s-a

, *que-s-a, afries., sw. V. (1): nhd. quetschen; ne. bruise (V.); Hw.: s.

quet-s-ene; E.: germ. *kwed-, sw. V., quetschen; idg. gÝed

h-, V., stoßen, verletzen,

zerstören, Pokorny 466; L.: AA 21

quet-s-ene

* 1, que-s-ene*, afries., F.: nhd. Quetschung; ne. bruise (N.); Hw.: vgl.

mnd. quetsen, mnl. quetsen; Q.: H, AA 21; E.: s. *quet-s-a; W.: s. nfries.

quetsinge; L.: Hh 84b, Hh 170, Rh 882b, AA 21

The first thing I say if my kids get a bruise is something like "that's bad" or literally, "that's no good" - the progression of words imo is the way we generally use them, bruise was bad. If someone intentionally bruised you (physically or your ego) they would, in your eyes, be evil - kwade - bad.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Did you compare it to the original text - no one else has a 'his' man - they have an attached s on their name - their men are not their husbands,

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

Enoch, Dywcke’s husband; Grevetman over Westflyland and Texel.

You can't have both. The other names would say the same thing of their men, but they don't.

The second sentence has 2 forms of his - that is Dywecke's and hus - there is not 2 forms - the his is either for DyweckES or for HUS - not both.

No, his is not for her imo. Or it is not a word that means his or hers then in this sentence. Dywek's man, you think is Dyweck his man, so Dywek is a woman, yet they are saying Dywek HIS man, yeah right.

Funny how HUSband happens to be HIS and the word is in the sentence then.

Then translate this one:

Thêrthrvch wêron thêr fêlo maenniska fon-t Findas land nêi vsa hêinde aend fêre Krêkalanda kvmen aend âk fêlo fon Lyda-his land.

Oh, and the second sentence is what Sandbach made of it in English.

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

In modern Dutch:

Enoch, Dywek's man, grevetman over West-flyland en Texland.

We have no word 'husband'. We use "man".

Puzz, if you don't believe me that -HIS is used for both male and female than check the OLB for yourself.

Lyda really is a female.

.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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No, -HIS is used everywhere.

Enoch Dywek his man, grêvetman ovir West-flylând aend Texland.

Enoch, Dywcke’s husband; Grevetman over Westflyland and Texel.

Thaet was Frya his dêi aend to thêre stonde was et vrlêden sjvgun wâra sjvgun jêr, thaet Faesta was anstaeld as folksmoder nêi Fryas jêrta.

It was Frya’s day, and seven times seven years had elapsed since Festa was appointed Volksmoeder by the desire of Frya.

That is nêi Frya-his tex aend-et skolde vnrjucht wêsa to vnthandana that.

This is Frya’s Tex, and it would be unjust to act contrary to it.

Thâ wrdon kraefta sâmlath, thri pêlun fon Godahis burch wrdon hja wither stonden, tha orloch bilêv.

Then all the forces were assembled, and three hours from Godasburgt they were withstood, but war continued.

Thêrthrvch wêron thêr fêlo maenniska fon-t Findas land nêi vsa hêinde aend fêre Krêkalanda kvmen aend âk fêlo fon Lyda-his land.

(Sandbach gives a crap translation. Other time better, lol).

As hja thêran nw en nôme jêva wilde, wrdon hja vnênes, svme wild-et Fryasburch hêta, ôra Nêf tünia, men tha Mâgjara aend tha Finna bâdon thaet skolde Thyrhisburch hête.

Then they wanted to give it a name, but disagreed about it. Some wanted to call it Fryasburgt, others Neeftunia; but the Magyars and Finns begged that it might be called Thyr's burgt.

Hi stêk thus mith sinum flâte nêi Lydia, thaet is Lyda his lând, thêr wildon tha swarta maenniska fâta hjam aend êta.

(Another incomplete translation by Sandbach).

Fon uta litha êlanda gvng-er ut wrêka tha Thyrjar skêpa aend landa birâwa, thêrvmbe send tha êlanda evin blyd Râwer êlanda, as Jonhis êlanda hêten.

From the smaller islands he made expeditions for vengeance on the Tyrians, and plundered their ships and their lands. Therefore these islands were called Insulæ Piratarum, as well as Jon's Islands.

Thêrumbe kêron wi Gêrt Pire his toghater to vsa Moder ut.

(Another wrong translation by Sandbach)

And so on.

+++

EDIT:

I again noticed Sandbach is not too averse of making 'free interpretations' or to simply leave out parts of the original text, aside from being plain wrong.

.

OK, think about this.

The word is not his because that is not Old Frisian - the word is this, which comes from the - it's thî in O.F - thee

thî-s-te = these ie; the more

This apple, these apples

It automatically makes a plural for apples.

It's not actually Lyda's burg, Lyda his burg - like she (or he...) owns it - it's name is Lyda the burg - Lyda thee burg.

Now, find HIS in the OLB text used as his - you won't.

The word used for his in the OLB is sin.

Nêarchus teld vs, sin kêning

but Nearchus told us that his king

sin:

sÆ-n

134, afries., Poss.-Pron.: nhd. sein (Poss.-Pron.); ne. his;

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Tha êrosta hêton hjara selva moder his svna,

The first called themselves mother’s sons,

aend tha ôthera hêton hjara selva tât his svna,

and the others called themselves father’s sons,

men tha Moder his svna ne wrde wrde navt ni meld,

but the mother’s sons did not count for much;

You can make it as complicated as you want, but I won't play along, lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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We do use husband in English and it would come from Frisian, you probably just lost it in Dutch.

Our houseman. One we keep at the house, you know, to cut wood and stuff... we kept him housebound our husband. Sandbach obviously knew a hisman was a husband.

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We do use husband in English and it would come from Frisian, you probably just lost it in Dutch.

Our houseman. One we keep at the house, you know, to cut wood and stuff... we kept him housebound our husband. Sandbach obviously knew a hisman was a husband.

Translate those other sentences Puzz. The one with Lyda, and the one with those mother's boys.

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Tha êrosta hêton hjara selva moder his svna,

The first called themselves mother’s sons,

aend tha ôthera hêton hjara selva tât his svna,

and the others called themselves father’s sons,

men tha Moder his svna ne wrde wrde navt ni meld,

but the mother’s sons did not count for much;

You can make it as complicated as you want, but I won't play along, lol.

.

You should.

Tha êrosta hêton hjara selva moder his svna,

The first called themselves mother’s sons,

The first called themselves 'the mothers sons'.

The word themselves, selva has already denoted the plural for mother, making it automatically mothers - that is mothers' - not mother's.

an apostrophe is used for a missing letter or word - it is not mother's - mother is/his or this - it should be mothers' if anything, plural.

Translate those other sentences Puzz. The one with Lyda, and the one with those mother's boys.

I just did and I have now for a couple - give me time, I'm working through them.

----------------------------------

This one is stumping me for now, but I will work it out, bear with me.

men tha Moder his svna ne wrde wrde navt ni meld,

but the mother’s sons did not count for much;

OK, got it - I cannot accept his is her in this so it would be the mother's ( 's = these = more - denotes plural) sons - a here denoting plural.

Edited by The Puzzler
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husband, friu-del 5, gad-a 1, man-n 200 und häufiger?, sith 38

http://www.koeblerge...h/ne-afries.pdf

And your translations are wrong.

I did translate them, btw.

.

"Moeder's zoon" - mother's son.

It can't be a plural.

You now think in modern English, and you therefore assume that HIS can have nothing to do with a mother.

But -HIS is NEUTRAL as possive/genitive in the OLB.

.

Edited by Abramelin
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husband, friu-del 5, gad-a 1, man-n 200 und häufiger?, sith 38

http://www.koeblerge...h/ne-afries.pdf

And your translations are wrong.

I did translate them, btw.

.

"Moeder's zoon" - mother's son.

It can't be a plural.

You now think in modern English, and you therefore assume that HIS can have nothing to do with a mother.

But -HIS is NEUTRAL as possive/genitive in the OLB.

.

Because the word is this - it is neutral.

No, I'm thinking how the words would have come together in the most reasonable way using language that has evolved from the older uses in languages like Frisian.

It's sons. svna.

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Just like 'café' (coffee) became the word for the place where it is served (in nowadays NL 'coffeeshops' are places where people can buy and smoke cannabis and it has nothing to do with coffee anymore), 'MÉID' (mead) is used in OLB (appearantly) for a place where people come together to socialize.

The question is: did someone brilliantly make this up himself (him = neutral), or was this meaning of the word forgotten long before the first dictionaries were made?

(To me the answer is simple, because I have no doubts about OLB's authenticity.)

Edited by Otharus
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Just like 'café' (coffee) became the word for the place where it is served (in nowadays NL 'coffeeshops' are places where people can buy and smoke cannabis and it has nothing to do with coffee anymore), 'MÉID' (mead) is used in OLB (appearantly) for a place where people come together to socialize.

.

The question is: did someone brilliantly make this up himself (him = neutral), or was this meaning of the word forgotten long before the first dictionaries were made?

(To me the answer is simple, because I have no doubts about OLB's authenticity.)

his dictionary.gif O.E. his (gen. of he), from P.Gmc. *khisa (cf. Goth. is, Ger. es). Originally also the neuter possessive pronoun, but replaced in that sense c.1600 by its. In M.E., hisis was tried for the absolute pronoun (cf. her/hers), but it failed to stick. For dialectal his'n, see her. http://www.etymonlin...ex.php?term=his

he dictionary.gif O.E. he (see paradigm of O.E. third person pronoun below), from P.Gmc. *hi- (cf. O.S., O.Fris., M.Du. he, hi, Du. hy, O.H.G. he), from PIE *ki-, variant of *ko-, the "this, here" (as opposed to "that, there") root http://www.etymonlin...owed_in_frame=0

As I said: Because the word is this - it is neutral.

Edited by The Puzzler
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Just like 'café' (coffee) became the word for the place where it is served (in nowadays NL 'coffeeshops' are places where people can buy and smoke cannabis and it has nothing to do with coffee anymore), 'MÉID' (mead) is used in OLB (appearantly) for a place where people come together to socialize.

Like a mead hall I guess - still connected to meeting.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mead_hall

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No one answered about BLIK.

Medeasblik.

blik comes up as show - which at first I didn't get was show as in 'show someone something - to look at' , I thought it was a show, performance, but I guess they are related too.

so I gather it was Medea's Look/watchhouse

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/blik#Old_Norse

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/blick#Middle_Low_German

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/look

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I didn't even know you had asked about 'blik', lol.

Anyway, to go on about the possessive/genitive:

His (with its variants is and ys) was much more common in this construction than her or their. The his-genitive, whichever pronoun is used, was most prevalent with proper names and especially after sibilants, as in Mars, Moses, Sands, and Grace, an environment in which the genitive ending is homophonous with the unstressed pronunciation of his. Although the his-genitive in Old English must have been the sort of topic-comment construction cited above, its early Modern English frequency was certainly due, at least in part, to a confusion of inflectional –s and his. The construction has survived, archaically, in printed bookplates: “John Smith His Book.”

http://wmjasco.blogs...his-origin.html

But now this:

Norwegian, especially colloquial such, uses reflexive possessive pronouns extensively. These are declined according to gender and number of the object (rather than that of the possessor), e.g. "Ola sin hund" ("Ola his dog"); "Per si(n) klokke" ("Per his clock"); "Hilde sitt hus" ("Hilde her house"); "Tina sine bøker" ("Tina her books"). In nynorsk one may also use "hans" and "hennar", e.g. "Klokka hans Per" ("The clock his Per"); "Huset hennar Hilde" ("The house her Hilde").

http://en.wikipedia....ki/His_genitive

So, if it's the same in the OLB, then you get this;

The mother his son / the mother's son

The father his son / the father's son\

The mother her daughter / the mother's daughter

The father her daughter / the father's daughter

But see how incinsisent the OLB is (or maybe it's 'poetic freedom'):

Moder-is rêd waerth wnnen

The mother’s advice was asked

Moder-is lêva

the mother's lifetime

Thet bok thêra Adela folstar

Het boek der Adela volgers

The Book of Adela's followers >> The Book of the Adela followers

Fryas rêd

Frya's council

Fryas tex

Frya's laws

Apol, Adelas man

Apol, Adela’s husband

Fryas baern

Frya’s children

Tex Fryas.

FRYA’S TEX.

Fryas willa

Frya’s will

Fryas folk

Frya’s people

Fryas rêdjevinga

Frya's counsels

Fryas svna

Frya’s sons

Frya-his tex

Frya’s Tex

Fryas tjanest

Frya’s service

Fryas kidde

Frya’s flock

Fryas fâmna

Frya’s maidens

Findas folk

Lydas folk

ut Findas blod

from Finda's blood

Findas land

Lyda-his land

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

.

Edited by Abramelin
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No one answered about BLIK.

Medeasblik.

blik comes up as show - which at first I didn't get was show as in 'show someone something - to look at' , I thought it was a show, performance, but I guess they are related too.

so I gather it was Medea's Look/watchhouse

http://en.wiktionary.../blik#Old_Norse

http://en.wiktionary...ddle_Low_German

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/look

But "Medemblik" is not the oldest form of the name:

De naam "Medemblik" is mogelijk afkomstig van de waterloop Medemelake of Medemelacha (Germaans miduma- "middelst" en laku- "waterloop in moerassig terrein"[1]) die op deze plaats heeft gelopen, en die in een oorkonde uit 985 wordt genoemd. Hierin wordt ook Medemblik zelf genoemd als "villa Medemelacha". Dit veenriviertje is tegenwoordig grotendeels verdwenen, maar het resterende deel is nog bekend als de Kromme Leek en mondt via de meertjes de Groote en Kleine Vliet bij Medemblik uit in het IJsselmeer.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medemblik_(stad)

The name "Medemblik" is probably derived from the watercourse Medemelake or Medemelacha (Germanic: miduma- "middle" and laku- "watercourse through marshy ground" [1]) that has run here, and which was mentioned in a charter of 985. In there also Medemblik itself is mentioned as "villa Medemelacha". This peat river has now largely disappeared, but the remainder is known as the Kromme ("Bent") Leek and flows through the lakes the Groote and Kleine Vliet to debouch into the IJsselmeer at Medemblik.

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The OLB hints at the same original words in the compostion, but with a twist (and again, not "blik"):

Thâ tha stjurar an da kreke lêjon was thêr en spotter fon ut Stavora mank, thêr sêide, Mêdêa mei lakkja, sa wi hyr ut hjra burch reda. Thêrvmbe haevon tha fâmna thju krêke Mêdêa mêi lakkja hêten.

When the sailors were in the creek, there was a wag from Stavoren among them, who said, Medea may well laugh if we rescue her from her citadel. Upon this, the maidens gave to the creek the name Medea mêilakkia (Lake of Medea).

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#bg

In my former post: Medemelake or Medemelacha

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But "Medemblik" is not the oldest form of the name:

De naam "Medemblik" is mogelijk afkomstig van de waterloop Medemelake of Medemelacha (Germaans miduma- "middelst" en laku- "waterloop in moerassig terrein"[1]) die op deze plaats heeft gelopen, en die in een oorkonde uit 985 wordt genoemd. Hierin wordt ook Medemblik zelf genoemd als "villa Medemelacha". Dit veenriviertje is tegenwoordig grotendeels verdwenen, maar het resterende deel is nog bekend als de Kromme Leek en mondt via de meertjes de Groote en Kleine Vliet bij Medemblik uit in het IJsselmeer.

http://nl.wikipedia....edemblik_(stad)

The name "Medemblik" is probably derived from the watercourse Medemelake or Medemelacha (Germanic: miduma- "middle" and laku- "watercourse through marshy ground" [1]) that has run here, and which was mentioned in a charter of 985. In there also Medemblik itself is mentioned as "villa Medemelacha". This peat river has now largely disappeared, but the remainder is known as the Kromme ("Bent") Leek and flows through the lakes the Groote and Kleine Vliet to debouch into the IJsselmeer at Medemblik.

Upon this, the maidens gave to the creek the name Medea mêilakkia (Lake of Medea).

The lake was named after Medea first. The OLB tells us this, Medemelacha, is Medea meilakkia obviously.

Medeasblik may have been there before Medemelacha, now it's named Medemblik.

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Upon this, the maidens gave to the creek the name Medea mêilakkia (Lake of Medea).

The lake was named after Medea first. The OLB tells us this, Medemelacha, is Medea meilakkia obviously.

Medeasblik may have been there before Medemelacha, now it's named Medemblik.

So, according to you, it went from

(1) Medeasblik >

(2) Medemalaka/Medemelacha (the river course and the villa) >

(3) Medemblik.

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I get something - sin is his - Ola sin hund

Maybe the 's became used when the word was sin

Ola s hund

Ola's hund - the apostrophe doesn't replace any letters to make the word as such - it denotes ownership from the word being sin once.

But it is inconsistent in the OLB to have sin for his and expect his to mean sin but be written as his.

Now, O.E she was once hio and heo.

No wonder anyone is confused.

she dictionary.gif mid-12c., probably evolving from O.E. seo, sio (acc. sie), fem. of demonstrative pronoun se "the." The Old English word for "she" was heo, hio, however by 13c. the pronunciation of this had converged by phonetic evolution with he "he," which apparently led to the fem. demonstrative pronoun being used in place of the pronoun (cf. similar development in Du. zij, Ger. sie, Gk. he, etc.). The original h- survives in her. A relic of the Old English pronoun is in Manchester-area dialectal oo "she."

hio is she (Frisian dictionary) and

hiona in the Frisian dictionary is spouse or servant.

There is HIO for she (etymology above AND Frisian dictionary) and you have spouse or servant off that.

hio-s = it's she's = it's hers ----- his in the OLB might mean hio-s (hers) when used after women's names.

My grandma always told me, "she's the cat's mother "- whatever that meant...

The she is the servant - the cats mother because the servants and she's, probably mostly women, so became synonymous with women, were the carers of the cats - now I get it, maybe, unless it's derogative and the cat's mother is a ho.

Edited by The Puzzler
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