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Alphamale06

The Ancient Alien Theory Is True

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S2F

Good point. Even steel saws used to cut wood have to be sharpened regularly.

...and flowing water carved out the Grand Canyon.

The proof of concept for mans abilities to work stone even with simple tools has been established well beyond reasonable doubt. If one wishes to counter that then they need to do a hell of a lot more than a bit of head scratching/head shaking. They need some damn good evidence...bulletproof even. What we've seen so far falls very short...to put it mildly.

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Abramelin

That article is over a year old and mentions DNA testing. Where's the results?

You'd think that if the results had been positive, we'd have known it by now.

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Sir Wearer of Hats

You'd think that if the results had been positive, we'd have known it by now.

nah "they" would have covered it all up, wouldn't "they".

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Vlad the Mighty

I think aliens did come to earth and interact with our ancestors. I think that's why we've never seen any openly visiting these days, because they just arent here anymore. They all ready came here, did what they wanted to do. Gather information on the planet, record Earths creatures, share a few pro tips with the silly humans to help them along, etc.

s

Gathering information and recording the fauna sounds reasonable; that's just the kind of thing that any program of scientific exploration would do. The second part, though, seems completely pointless. If they wanted to help the puny Humans along, why bother with giving them elaborate architectural tips, but not, say, technology or advances in medical science that might be of, perhaps, a bit more use to them? Why didn't they share with the Incas a few tips or technology that might have helped them resist the Conquistadores? "The Spanish horsemen, fully armored, had great technological superiority over the Inca forces. The traditional mode of battle in the Andes was a kind of siege warfare where large numbers of usually reluctant draftees were sent to overwhelm opponents. The Spaniards had developed one of the finest military machines in the premodern world, tactics learned in their centuries' long fight against Moorish kingdoms in Iberia. Along with this tactical and material superiority, the Spaniards also had acquired tens of thousands of native allies who sought to end the Inca control of their territories." A fat lot of help those pro tips were, then, weren't they?

Edited by 747400

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zoser

Don't start that again. How did they extrude these:

http://peruenroute.w...ow-incas-built/

So you mean that the Incas extruded copper wire now? Great.

The link unfortunately shows no picture of copper wire.

It wouldn't be strong enough anyway. It would need to be steel.

Do you know why wire was mentioned?

Edited by zoser

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zoser

You are so stuck on the flawed AA logic. Just because I don't know how it was faked doesn't mean it wasn't faked.

I'm saying it could be faked.

He might have rented one of these at a nearby village:

concretecutter_zps75ab40c6.png

That's right. Nothing better than blunting an expensive grinder on an andesite mound by performing a pointless cut. Did they hire out these in Egypt too?

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Sir Wearer of Hats

isn' all you need to extrude copper is heat, pressure and a small hole?

Copper is the first metal humanity learnt how to smelt, so makinh copper wire isn't a stretch (pardon the pun)

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zoser

A lot of these look too "fresh". That's why I think some are faked or the age is misrepresented.

Can you substantiate that?

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zoser

You'd think that if the results had been positive, we'd have known it by now.

You'd think that if the results had been positive, we'd have known it by now.

The date was posted earlier in the thread for the preliminary results.

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zoser

Truthfully I wasn't even paying attention to that part. I just wanted to show off some of the "impossible" soft metal artifacts.

Those are not impossible and in no way at all explain the kind of cut shown in the earlier clip.

Just to re-itterate, no one here has satisfactorily produced an explanation of how this cut was done. Mr O has provided me with a link showing tools; unfortunately none of them could do this.

Maybe some will shout hoax again like they did with the last clip.

Edited by zoser

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zoser

I have a question for you zoser. What do you think about things like worry stones or the Black Stone at Mecca that have been worn smooth just by human contact. According to your logic such a thing would be impossible, and yet there is proof that softer materials (human lips even) can wear and smooth stone. Furthermore, if harder materials could not possibly be worn by softer materials then explain tool wear on things like drill bits and saw blades. Your refusal to admit that a copper/sand 'bit' can be used to drill stone is basically a refusal to be even remotely reasonable. The ancients had the means, time and manpower to accomplish these feats of engineering, hands down...pun intended.

In no way will that achieve the precision at the precision walls at Cuzco and Koricancha. Mr O produced some weak evidence of a hole being cut using copper pipe. They achieved 6cm depth and used 9cm of copper in the process. Complete fail.

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Imaginarynumber1

Making Fire

makingfire_zps276aa57d.jpg

Stone Arrowhead and Spear

stone_age___spear_zpsdc79a6ec.png

Bow and Arrow

bow_and_arrow_zpsbdde99ba.jpg

The only logical answer is that aliens gave them that technology......

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zoser

isn' all you need to extrude copper is heat, pressure and a small hole?

Copper is the first metal humanity learnt how to smelt, so makinh copper wire isn't a stretch (pardon the pun)

Incredibly easy. Anyone could do it (couldn't they?). Then think is copper hard enough? The problems only get worse. This is a classic example of arkies sinking ever deeper into the mud like I suggested earlier.

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S2F

That's right. Nothing better than blunting an expensive grinder on an andesite mound by performing a pointless cut. Did they hire out these in Egypt too?

So you admit that a softer material (andesite in this case) can wear down a harder material (a diamond tipped saw blade)? Congratulations zoser, you might actually be making progress.

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S2F

In no way will that achieve the precision at the precision walls at Cuzco and Koricancha. Mr O produced some weak evidence of a hole being cut using copper pipe.

It establishes proof of concept. The method only needs refinement. The skills developed over years of working stone would have given ancient civilizations all of the refinement they ever needed.

They achieved 6cm depth and used 9cm of copper in the process.

What exactly about this makes it impossible? It is an issue that is easily solved with a refined method, skilled workers and an abundance of copper. All of the things that the people at Puma Punku (or a multitude of other ancient civs) possessed.

Complete fail.

Nonsense. That you can't see the significance doesn't negate it.

Edited by Slave2Fate

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zoser

So you admit that a softer material (andesite in this case) can wear down a harder material (a diamond tipped saw blade)? Congratulations zoser, you might actually be making progress.

How you deduced that from this post I have no idea. Are you imagining things?

The post was about Synch's claims that some wag using an angle grinder produced the cut shown in a previous clip rather than the ancients did it.

Now you are talking about copper wearing down hard stone????????

Not sure how you got to that but still. :blush:

No it has not been satisfactorily proved that copper can wear down hard stone to be able to achieve the scale of work demonstrated by the ancients.

Mr O's previous 'evidence' shows that a one off hole can be drilled (precision unknown) with an enormous copper loss. That's it.

If you have some new proof of how copper could cut stone on the scale demonstrated then please show it.

Edited by zoser

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zoser

It establishes proof of concept. The method only needs refinement. The skills developed over years of working stone would have given ancient civilizations all of the refinement they ever needed.

What exactly about this makes it impossible? It is an issue that is easily solved with a refined method, skilled workers and an abundance of copper. All of the things that the people at Puma Punku (or a multitude of other ancient civs) possessed.

Nonsense. That you can't see the significance doesn't negate it.

No aretfacts to support it I'm afraid. No evidence that they had could production line copper in the enormous volumes required. Silly idea really.

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S2F

No aretfacts to support it I'm afraid. No evidence that they had could production line copper in the enormous volumes required. Silly idea really.

Enormous volumes? Pray tell just how much volume would there be, even at a 3:2 ratio?

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Sir Wearer of Hats

Incredibly easy. Anyone could do it (couldn't they?). Then think is copper hard enough? The problems only get worse. This is a classic example of arkies sinking ever deeper into the mud like I suggested earlier.

I'm not talking about the purpose of the copper, just refuting your suggestion that it wouldn't be possible for Bronze Ageish peoples to make copper wire.

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zoser

Enormous volumes? Pray tell just how much volume would there be, even at a 3:2 ratio?

Are you seriously trying to claim that a 9 cm material loss for a 6 cm deep hole is sustainable for ancient people? it would be economically crippling and they had no means to industrialise copper production on that scale.

Just look at the number of walls. Check out Cuzco, Koricancha, Ollyantaytambo, Sacsayhuaman, Tiwanaku and Puma Punku. Where were the enormous copper mines capable of providing such an enormous mountain of material?

Edited by zoser

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zoser

I'm not talking about the purpose of the copper, just refuting your suggestion that it wouldn't be possible for Bronze Ageish peoples to make copper wire.

Proof is everything. Also provide proof please that copper wire can cut granite. Then provide evidence that it can be done with an acceptable material loss.

See you in 7 weeks.

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Sir Wearer of Hats

I don't need to prove that as I'm not suggesting it can. I'm suggesting it's easy to make copper wire.

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S2F

Are you seriously trying to claim that a 9 cm material loss for a 6 cm deep hole is sustainable for ancient people? it would be economically crippling and they had no means to industrialise copper production on that scale.

Just look at the number of walls. Check out Cuzco, Koricancha, Ollyantaytambo, Sacsayhuaman, Tiwanaku and Puma Punku. Where were the enormous copper mines capable of providing such an enormous mountain of material?

In case you got lost somewhere along the way, I'm talking about the holes that were (yes) drilled using a copper tube/sand coring method. What is the cumulative length of all of the holes drilled? Even a 3:2 loss is the worst case scenario with untrained men and methods. The ancients could likely have done significantly better, possibly even 1:1. An 'enormous mountain of material'? You're taking the p***.

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zoser

I don't need to prove that as I'm not suggesting it can. I'm suggesting it's easy to make copper wire.

For us or the ancients?

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zoser

In case you got lost somewhere along the way, I'm talking about the holes that were (yes) drilled using a copper tube/sand coring method. What is the cumulative length of all of the holes drilled? Even a 3:2 loss is the worst case scenario with untrained men and methods. The ancients could likely have done significantly better, possibly even 1:1. An 'enormous mountain of material'? You're taking the p***.

No amount of skill and training is going to give reduced copper loss when drilling hard stone. Your argument doesn't hold.

Escape_From_Quicksand.jpg

Edited by zoser

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