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Alphamale06

The Ancient Alien Theory Is True

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zoser

Those are not handling marks. Every block would have the same marks if they were.

Really? Quite an assumption. How do you know that they actually needed to handle them? They suggest accidental contact while the stone was soft, not an essential gripping hole. Think about it.

"Surely a few of those 20,000 labourers were still around when Garcilaso was young. Was everyone struck with amnesia? Or is Sacsayhuaman much older than we've been led to believe?"

No, for GdlV was writing his chronicle in Spain.

He would have been aware of the facts as a child if indeed they were facts.

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Abramelin

Who heard it from a farmer, who heard it from a shepherd who heard it from a blacksmith..............................compelling evidence?

Sure. They were all lying at the time, and only that modern Peruvian guy who was inspired by his dreams, that one you believe,

How could it be otherwise, eh?

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Abramelin

He would have been aware of the facts as a child if indeed they were facts.

The Incas stopped building that way because of those - read my lips - conquistadores.

They lost the war, and were glad to survive the 'civilizing' by the hands of the priests ,monks and all those other warm hearted representatives of our culture.

So all he could do is listen to his uncle.

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zoser

Sure. They were all lying at the time, and only that modern Peruvian guy who was inspired by his dreams, that one you believe,

How could it be otherwise, eh?

The point is Abe from de La Vega's own testimony he has only crude conjecture. Nowhere does it say that he saw Sacsayhuaman being constructed, and I absolutely guarantee that you won't find it anywhere in his writings.

Better you look closely at the pictures instead of trying to graft sub theories in and make them stick.

The alkali brew is a good find in terms of statue work; but not to explain all the megalithic precision block work.

It would revolutionise the construction industry in a single sweep and put manufacturers of stone cutters out of business over night. Think about it.

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zoser

The Incas stopped building that way because of those - read my lips - conquistadores.

I know the history as you do Abe.

Further think on this:

Suppose while writing his books in Spain he did happen to mention something exotic such as directed heat sources?

What do you suppose the church would have done to him?

So how likely is it that his memoirs were written without bias?

Edited by zoser

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Oniomancer

No refutation there Mr O.

What's in the pictures is in the pictures.

:tu:

I'm sorry, the answer we were looking for is down.

Down.

Any rock that's in a semi-fluid state then is going to sag which way? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

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Abramelin

I'm sorry, the answer we were looking for is down.

Down.

Any rock that's in a semi-fluid state then is going to sag which way? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

I know it happens to large glass windows in cathedrals: the bottom end of the glass panes bulges outwards after...years??

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Abramelin

I know the history as you do Abe.

Further think on this:

Suppose while writing his books in Spain he did happen to mention something exotic such as directed heat sources?

What do you suppose the church would have done to him?

So how likely is it that his memoirs were written without bias?

You think he would have been punished if he had said the Incas melted the rock by using extreme heat?

Or if he has said the Incas melted/softened the outside of the rock? Like glass or something?

Nah. I don't think so.

++

EDIT:

He never mentioned anything like an extreme heat source. But I haven't read all of his thousands of pages, but it's not in the part that deals with how the Incas constructed their buildings.

.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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bmk1245

Nice guess work though eh? When you find the exact evidence?

On the first picture the bottom arrow shows the bulging out effect again. The top arrow more handling marks.

zoser17_zps69695709.jpg

Could this next picture indicate evidence of final finishing? The overhang looks as if it has been trimmed off. Again this would not be such a gargantuan task if the stone was semi-soft:

zoser18-1_zps8b57dcb1.jpg

Sigh...

sunset.jpg

(link)

See "imprints"?

Seriously, your posts become more and more sillier..

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zoser

I'm sorry, the answer we were looking for is down.

Down.

Any rock that's in a semi-fluid state then is going to sag which way? Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?

Depends how soft. Try the same effect by stacking plasticine blocks on top of each other. The sag is outwards.

It's easily replicatable.

If they were that soft they would melt so the softening had to be only partial to get the precise join.

The shear weight caused a balloon effect more noticeable on larger blocks and towards the bottom. Exactly what the pictures say.

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JGirl

Yeah but you're just guessing that that is what happened. How many times must it be said that what something 'looks like' means diddly squat?

but slave, this is how it's gone on from the beginning of this thread with zoser. he thinks his contributions are gold and the rest of us are lacking.

if you took all his videos and pictures off this thread he would have nothing.

if you leave all the pictures and videos on the thread he has nothing.

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Abramelin

The point is Abe from de La Vega's own testimony he has only crude conjecture. Nowhere does it say that he saw Sacsayhuaman being constructed, and I absolutely guarantee that you won't find it anywhere in his writings.

Better you look closely at the pictures instead of trying to graft sub theories in and make them stick.

The alkali brew is a good find in terms of statue work; but not to explain all the megalithic precision block work.

It would revolutionise the construction industry in a single sweep and put manufacturers of stone cutters out of business over night. Think about it.

But I NEVER SAID that he was there when Sacsayhuman was constructed, because - again - he heard it from his uncle (3d time).

Let's see if we can find that plant. If it's true, then the search for an explanation is over.

Precision stone work: they used wedges to split the stone, added water and wood to expand the split wider (or hammering the wedges deeper into the rock), and finished it by applying some chemical brew to the sides of the block, giving it a shine. Or even making only the sides softer and then put the stones together again in some wall, pressing them together to make the still quite soft sides fit perfectly.

But I think it is very unlikely that an extreme heat source was used to melt the rocks. We must be able to find some sort of apparatus or contraption that the Incas or their predecessors used to melt these rocks.

We never found them, and so.... the aliens must have taken them back with them.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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zoser

Sigh...

(link)

See "imprints"?

Seriously, your posts become more and more sillier..

Really? The following marks are natural? Again you fail to look at all of the evidence. It's one common thing that people here are doing. Just looking at one picture or one aspect and trying to make a case. That's just laziness.

Please look at a wider selection of artefacts.

Also I did post this only a few pages ago so there really is no excuse.

zoser19_zps7e55280c.jpg

Edited by zoser

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zoser

But I NEVER SAID that he was there when Sacsayhuman was constructed, because - again - he heard it from his uncle (3d time).

Let's see if we can find that plant. If it's true, then the search for an explanation is over.

Precision stone work: they used wedges to split the stone, added water and wood to expand the split wider (or hammering the wedges deeper into the rock), and finished it by applying some chemical brew to the sides of the block, giving it a shine. Or even making only the sides softer and then put the stones together again in some wall, pressing them together to make the still quite soft sides fit perfectly.

But I think it is very unlikely that an extreme heat source was used to melt the rocks. We must be able to find some sort of apparatus or contraption that the Incas or their predecessors used to melt these rocks.

We never found them, and so.... the aliens must have taken them back with them.

.

You need to find a plant. Then you need to find a source where hundreds of gallons could be extracted. That is the amount needed to cover the megalithic buildings.

But wait; according to the guy in your post there is some in New York!

Then you need to explain how it could be applied to achieve undercuts where the rock was quarried.

Now if all you are doing is explaining how they used a chemical aid to help carve statues then fine. You have a perfectly workable theory.

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zoser

Let's see if we can find that plant. If it's true, then the search for an explanation is over.

.

Typical archaeological approach; "we found one example so that has to account for the whole phenomena"..

Never in a million years will that do.

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Myles

Really? The following marks are natural? Again you fail to look at all of the evidence. It's one common thing that people here are doing. Just looking at one picture or one aspect and trying to make a case. That's just laziness.

Please look at a wider selection of artefacts.

Also I did post this only a few pages ago so there really is no excuse.

zoser19_zps7e55280c.jpg

He provided a pic with similar markings. Do you believe aliens were involved with the rocks in his pic too.

What you are showing us can be found on millions of rocks.

Nothing to see here.

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zoser

Precision stone work: they used wedges to split the stone, added water and wood to expand the split wider (or hammering the wedges deeper into the rock), and finished it by applying some chemical brew to the sides of the block, giving it a shine. Or even making only the sides softer and then put the stones together again in some wall, pressing them together to make the still quite soft sides fit perfectly.

Wedges of what exactly? Wood? Stone? To split andesite and granite to that level of precision?

Nah.

More de La Vega fairy tales from his Uncle.

He provided a pic with similar markings. Do you believe aliens were involved with the rocks in his pic too.

What you are showing us can be found on millions of rocks.

Nothing to see here.

Depends what your looking to see.

Little evidence that was natural.

Edited by zoser

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zoser

but slave, this is how it's gone on from the beginning of this thread with zoser. he thinks his contributions are gold and the rest of us are lacking.

Not lacking intelligence but lacking in thoroughness. I let the evidence speak for itself and I study a wide range of material. Not just one picture, or one anecdote, but a wide range. Then pull it all together.

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Abramelin

Wedges of what exactly? Wood? Stone? To split andesite and granite to that level of precision?

Nah.

Yes. First split the rocks, and then smoothen and soften the fresh sides, and lastly: put/press them against eachother.

There are YouTube videos about a guy splitting a huge granite block with hammering wedges in a rock. The Incas are said to have used wooden wedges they stuck in the fresh holes, and then poured water on the wooden wedges so they would expand and split the rock.

Anyway, you know what I am going to do now, lol? Next to the building I live in is a florist shop. I'll ask the guy who works there.

"You can buy it in the stores, in a florist’s in New York. The Latin name escapes me, but its got ordinary sort of rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple instead of being green. It has a substance in it that is a very strong alkali and not an acid."

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zoser

Yes. First split the rocks, and then smoothen and soften the fresh sides, and lastly: put/press them against eachother.

Never in a million years will that work with megalithic blocks. Not enough leverage or force available

There are YouTube videos about a guy splitting a huge granite block with hammering wedges in a rock. The Incas are said to have used wooden wedges they stuck in the fresh holes, and then poured water on the wooden wedges so they would expand and split the rock.

Yes found it. Like the heavy duty power drill. I wonder which branch of Wall Mart the Inca visited??

[media=]

[/media]

Anyway, you know what I am going to do now, lol? Next to the building I live in is a florist shop. I'll ask the guy who works there.

"You can buy it in the stores, in a florist’s in New York. The Latin name escapes me, but its got ordinary sort of rather spongy-looking red leaves–it’s red and purple instead of being green. It has a substance in it that is a very strong alkali and not an acid."

Very nice. Now ask him how it is going to revolutionise the construction industry and put thousands of power tool companies out of business.

Maybe the guy in the above clip could have used some eh?

Edited by zoser

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zoser

PS nice hardened steel wedges!

Nice cold steel lump hammer

What a fairy tale inventor you are Abe!

Edited by zoser

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Oniomancer

I know it happens to large glass windows in cathedrals: the bottom end of the glass panes bulges outwards after...years??

Actually, that's a myth. The sagging window glass is an artifact of the manufacturing process:

http://www.glassnotes.com/WindowPanes.html

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quillius

I do love backing an underdog.......and I must say, Zoser...you are certianly an underdog in this fight but I am glad to see you are still swinging :santa:

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zoser

I do love backing an underdog.......and I must say, Zoser...you are certianly an underdog in this fight but I am glad to see you are still swinging :santa:

You bet.

Take a look at the cut out in this mountainside and try and explain it with 'feathers' and 'wedges'

So please let's cut the nonsense.

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Oniomancer

Depends how soft. Try the same effect by stacking plasticine blocks on top of each other. The sag is outwards.

It's easily replicatable.

If they were that soft they would melt so the softening had to be only partial to get the precise join.

The shear weight caused a balloon effect more noticeable on larger blocks and towards the bottom. Exactly what the pictures say.

Source?

I'm pretty sure you'd have to push plasticine to get it to bulge like that. It's viscosity isn't that high.

If you're vitrifying rock, you're getting it to melting temperature. If they're soft enough to bulge on their own under those conditions, they're soft enough to sag. and the vitrification would be more than skin deep.

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