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IAEA: Equipment for making nukes missing from Iraq


Erikl

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IAEA: Equipment for making nukes missing from Iraq

By ASSOCIATED PRESS

UNITED NATIONS

The UN nuclear watchdog expressed concern Monday at the disappearance of high-precision equipment from Iraq's nuclear facilities that could be used to make nuclear weapons.

In a letter to the UN Security Council, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said some industrial material that Iraq sent overseas has been located in other countries but not high-precision items including milling machines and electron beam welders that have both commercial and military uses.

"As the disappearance of such equipment and materials may be of proliferation significance, any state that has information about the location of such items should provide IAEA with that information," said the agency's director-general, Muhammad El-Baradei.

IAEA inspectors left Iraq just before the March 2003 US-led war. US President George W. Bush's administration then barred UN weapons inspectors from returning, deploying US teams in an unsuccessful search for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.

Nonetheless, IAEA teams were allowed into Iraq in June 2003 to investigate reports of widespread looting of storage rooms at the main nuclear complex at Tuwaitha, and in August to take inventory of "several tons" of natural uranium in storage near Tuwaitha.

El-Baradei told the council that Iraq is still obligated, under IAEA agreements, "to declare semi-annually changes that have occurred or are foreseen at sites deemed relevant by the agency." But since March 2003 "the agency has received no such notifications or declarations from any state," he said.

As a result of the IAEA's ongoing review of satellite photos and follow-up investigations, El-Baradei said, "the IAEA continues to be concerned about the widespread and apparently systematic dismantlement that has taken place at sites previously relevant to Iraq's nuclear program and sites previously subject to ongoing monitoring and verification by the agency."

"The imagery shows in many instances the dismantlement of entire buildings that housed high precision equipment ... formerly monitored and tagged with IAEA seals, as well as the removal of equipment and materials (such as high-strength aluminum) from open storage areas," he said.

In a report to the Security Council in early September, the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission, which is charged with overseeing the elimination of any banned Iraqi missile, chemical and biological weapons programs, also expressed concern about the disappearance of tagged equipment.

Demetri Perricos, head of the commission, known as UNMOVIC, said Iraqi authorities for over a year have been shipping thousands of tons of scrap metal out of the country, including at least 42 engines from banned missiles and other equipment that could be used to produce banned weapons.

The report said the export was handled by the Iraqi Ministry of Trade, which was under the direct supervision of US occupation authorities until June 28, when the Americans handed power to Iraq's interim government.

El-Baradei told the council that Iraq's Minister of Science and Technology Rashad Omar visited IAEA headquarters in Vienna in July to discuss the implementation of various Security Council resolutions. This was followed by a number of letters and another visit in September by a ministry delegation, which submitted a number of requests for assistance.

He told the council Iraq asked for IAEA assistance in selling the remaining nuclear material at Tuwaitha "with the exception of a small quantity to be retained for research purposes" and in dismantling and decontaminating former nuclear facilities. The interim Iraqi government also asked for the resumption of IAEA technical cooperation in a number of areas previously approved by the Security Council, he said.

"The agency is assessing the possibility of providing such assistance," El-Baradei said.

SOURCE

But I thought El-Baradei said no WMD equimpment or facilities could be found in Iraq blink.gif... rolleyes.gif

Edited by Erikl
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If I'm not mistaken, wasn't there satellite pictures of convoys of 18 wheelers moving out of Iraq into Syria just before the war?

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When I first read the title, I mistakenly thought that the title said IKEA, not IAEA.

I thought to myself; geez, I didn't know that a cheap furniture store would have anything to do with the nuclear equipment in Iraq...IKEA sure has come along way from particle board desks and futons...

grin2.gif

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Iraq says nuclear sites 'secure'

Iraq's interim government is playing down concerns over the disappearance of materials from nuclear sites that could be used to make atomic weapons.

The UN nuclear monitoring agency says satellite imagery shows that entire buildings have been dismantled and specialised equipment is missing.

Interim Technology Minister Rashid Omar said equipment was taken by looters soon after the US-led invasion.

But since then, he told the BBC, Iraq's nuclear facilities had been secured.

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) spokesman, Mark Gwozdecky, said the Americans themselves might have been responsible for dismantling buildings and removing materials, but had not yet responded to requests for clarification.

He added that the problem would remain one of nuclear proliferation until it could be shown that the missing materials were in responsible hands.

British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw has ordered a detailed report into the matter.

'Science park'

Mr Omar said he was not aware of any buildings being demolished at Iraq's main nuclear site at Tuwaitha.

But he added that eight buildings there were being rehabilitated as part of a plan to turn the site into a science and technology park for peaceful research.

"As far as I am concerned, the ministry of Science and Technology which controlled the Tuwaitha site, which included the Iraqi nuclear facilities, the location was looted - the buildings, the equipment - immediately after the collapse of the regime," he told the BBC.

"Then afterwards it came under the control of the coalition forces and the area was well-protected until the transition of sovereignty.

"After the transition of sovereignty to us it is under our control and the location is well-protected and there is no looting."

Mr Omar insisted that Iraq would fulfil its responsibilities to the IAEA, and inform it of any equipment being moved.

He invited the agency to come when it wanted to Iraq, promising free access.

Inspectors from the IAEA, who established that Saddam Hussein had abandoned any nuclear weapons programme before the war, have not been allowed to move about Iraq freely by the US.

Apart from a couple of limited checks on Tuwaitha last June after reports of looting - and with no teams now on the ground - the IAEA has to rely on satellite imagery and other sources.

'On sale abroad'

In a letter to the UN Security Council, Mr ElBaradei said buildings related to Iraq's previous nuclear programme appeared to have been systematically dismantled and equipment and material removed.

"The disappearance of such equipment and materials may be of proliferation significance," the IAEA director general warned.

Sensitive technology such as rocket engines had turned up for sale abroad, Mr ElBaradei said.

However, high-precision "dual-use" items including milling machines and electron beam welders appear to have disappeared, as has material such as high-strength aluminium.

Mr ElBaradei called on any state with information on the location of such items to inform his agency.

The US removed nearly two tonnes of low-enriched uranium from Iraq earlier this year. The IAEA has verified that 550 tonnes of nuclear material still remain at Tuwaitha.

Iraq, the agency says, has asked for help to sell the nuclear material and in dismantling and decontaminating former nuclear facilities.

Mr ElBaradei reminded the Security Council that Iraq was still obliged to "declare semi-annually changes that have occurred or are foreseen at sites deemed relevant" by the IAEA.

However, since March 2003 "the agency has received no such notifications or declarations from any state", he said.

Story from BBC NEWS:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/worl...ast/3736650.stm

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Iraq asks nuclear watchdog back

Iraq's interim government has invited the UN nuclear watchdog to check on the disappearance of materials from its former nuclear sites.

Iraqi Technology Minister Rashad Omar said International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors had free access and could come back when they wanted.

He said there had been looting at the start of the US-led invasion, but the sites were now secure.

An IAEA report says technology is missing from Iraq's nuclear sites.

The agency says satellite imagery shows that entire buildings have been dismantled, while materials and specialised equipment have disappeared.

The IAEA responded to Iraq's invitation by saying that any decision on the return of its inspectors would have to come from the UN Security Council.

IAEA spokeswoman Melissa Fleming said the agency was concerned that sensitive technology might have fallen into the hands of those involved in the black market in nuclear weapons.

She said scrap metal from Iraqi nuclear sites, some of which was mildly radioactive, had been turning up abroad.

US State Department spokesman Richard Boucher echoed the IAEA's concerns, saying Washington had no detailed knowledge of what might have disappeared or where it might have gone.

"That's a problem that occurred right after the war that we do think has been brought under control," he said.

However, Mr Boucher added that the IAEA had been allowed access to Iraq's main nuclear site, Tuwaitha, twice since the US-led war - in June last year and August this year.

British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw has ordered a detailed report into the matter.

'Science park'

Mr Omar said he was not aware of any buildings being demolished at Tuwaitha.

But he added that eight buildings there were being rehabilitated, as part of a plan to turn the site into a science and technology park for peaceful research.

"As far as I am concerned, the ministry of science and technology which controlled the Tuwaitha site, which included the Iraqi nuclear facilities, the location was looted - the buildings, the equipment - immediately after the collapse of the regime," he told the BBC.

"Then afterwards it came under the control of the coalition forces and the area was well-protected until the transition of sovereignty.

"After the transition of sovereignty to us it is under our control and the location is well-protected and there is no looting."

Mr Omar insisted that Iraq would fulfil its responsibilities to the IAEA, and inform it of any equipment being moved.

Inspectors from the IAEA, who established that Saddam Hussein had abandoned any nuclear weapons programme before the war, have not been allowed to move about Iraq freely by the US.

With no teams now on the ground, the IAEA has to rely on satellite imagery and other sources.

'On sale abroad'

In a letter to the UN Security Council, IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei said buildings related to Iraq's previous nuclear programme appeared to have been systematically dismantled and equipment and material removed.

"The disappearance of such equipment and materials may be of proliferation significance," the IAEA director general warned.

Sensitive technology such as rocket engines had turned up for sale abroad, Mr ElBaradei said.

However, high-precision "dual-use" items including milling machines and electron beam welders appear to have disappeared, as has material such as high-strength aluminium.

Mr ElBaradei called on any state with information on the location of such items to inform his agency.

The US removed nearly two tonnes of low-enriched uranium from Iraq earlier this year. The IAEA has verified that 550 tonnes of nuclear material still remain at Tuwaitha.

Iraq, the agency says, has asked for help to sell the nuclear material and in dismantling and decontaminating former nuclear facilities.

Story from BBC NEWS:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/worl...ast/3737996.stm

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Okay...

blink.gif

If I'm not mistaken, wasn't there satellite pictures of convoys of 18 wheelers moving out of Iraq into Syria just before the war?

Yeah, I think there was. Moving into somewhere anyway.

ph34r.gif

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Ahhh.......what a cheery thought, just what we all need!

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HA HA

George really has made the world a much safer place.

Now theyve got nukes. lol.

I see we have another tenuous reason being formulated as we speak by the right wing to invade more countrys. lol you cant make this stuff up.lol

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they don't have nukes you twit

they might have equipment which could be used to help make nukes, that said, i thought saddam didn't have any capability? If saddam had no capability, what does it matter if anyone else gets their hands on this stuff (lets ignore the whole nuclear blackmarket which led to Libya, Iran and North Korea getting started)

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Yeah, I thought Saddam didn't have anything to be worried about? How can the UN misplace... nothing? Oh, there was something? Ohhh... wait... I thought there was nothing... no there was something, wait, there was nothing to be worried about, wait, they've misplaced something... wait, nothing, or something...

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Yeah, bathory and Celumnaz, they conveniently forget about that. thumbsup.gifwhistling2.gif

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Exactly!

Boyccot the UN!

Only 30% of it's members are democracies, yet any country get one vote.

How can dictators vote when they themselves deny this basic right from their own citizens!

The UN is nothing short of a corrupted, totalitarian organization.

I say, create a United Democratic Nations, with dictators who wish to perform reforms towards democracy in their forum will only get an observer status.

The HQ of this organization should be in India, the largest democracy on earth (and for the simple fact that 50% of all people who live under democracies live in India).

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they don't have nukes you twit

they might have equipment which could be used to help make nukes, that said, i thought saddam didn't have any capability? If saddam had no capability, what does it matter if anyone else gets their hands on this stuff (lets ignore the whole nuclear blackmarket which led to Libya, Iran and North Korea getting started)

BAthory remove your head from yer ****.

You know what i meant you sarcastic pain in the ****. lol

Th terrorists have more capability now than they ever did before the war in Iraq.

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