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The fracking bubble is about to burst


Guest Br Cornelius

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More evidence of what I have been saying.

http://www.erec.org/..._Gas_on_RES.pdf

It also highlights that a Shale boom represents a real and serious threat to renewables take up and thus cannot be considered a transition fuel - rather a displacing fuel with a very short window of availability.

Nonsense. It does not "highlight" that at all, it simply makes the claim. And "it" is a opinion paper by an activist anti-fracking group. Gee, why am am I not surprised.

You are seriously confusing opinion and fact.

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Nonsense. It does not "highlight" that at all, it simply makes the claim. And "it" is a opinion paper by an activist anti-fracking group. Gee, why am am I not surprised.

You are seriously confusing opinion and fact.

There is more than enough evidence pointing to the bubble nature of the gas boom in that article. The situation with Shell is evidence enough that there are serious problems in the fracking industry. You should read the actual insider reports with an impartial mind for a change.

Br Cornelius

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The real problem is people are worried about property prices dropping, good for buyers but bad for sellers. It's exactly the same with High Speed project which was done on The One Show, people were worried about money than the environment

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Frakking crack-ers and in a few years time they will wonder why there are suddenly huge earthquakes.

The largest earthquake in connection with oil/gas production that I am aware of was the 5.6 quake in Jones, Oklahoma that was ascribed to an injection well there. That's not fracking - injection is something different. There may well have been some quakes resutling from fracking, but if so, I am not aware of them. Such a quake could occur on a fault that is already under stress and getting ready to slip, anyway.

I live about 40 miles from Jones and felt the quake. It cracked some plaster in my house. It knocked a tower out of a building at a campus near OKC. Otherwise, damage was minimal. But it seems to me that that well is a known quake hazard and that continuing injection operations is an irresponsible action.

As far as fracking not being economical much longer: oil/gas is a boom-and-bust business. We are in the boom part of the cycle. When the bust hits, fracking could well be too expensive to be economical. But as soon as we get through the bust, it will pay once again. I don't think a little economic downturn is going to put fracking out of business.

Doug

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Everyone keeps saying "fracking." I thought it was "fracting: (after "fracture"). (Interestingly, neither spelling passes my spell checker).

At any rate, this goes to show how people have to be careful with names as any associations it brings can cause irrational political opposition. Look at "fluoridation," or at "rapeseed oil" or at "dolphin meat."

I have a strong suspicion there is tons of oil still available, but the suppliers want too keep the price high so they poor-mouth a lot, or at least understate reserves as much as they can. The guy above who thinks there may be another oil price bust on the horizon may be right on the button.

Edited by Frank Merton
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The real problem for me is that Fracking is a huge distraction from the job in hand - another ponzi scheme sucking resources away from renewables for very short term "investor" gains for those fueling the hype. Think what all of that wasted money could have done for building a new efficient energy grid, or investment in geothermal or windfarms.

Br Cornelius

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The real problem for me is that Fracking is a huge distraction from the job in hand - another ponzi scheme sucking resources away from renewables for very short term "investor" gains for those fueling the hype. Think what all of that wasted money could have done for building a new efficient energy grid, or investment in geothermal or windfarms.

Br Cornelius

some People of Britain dont want turbines, or solar panels, they just want money from selling their land or houses. If they build all win turbines around where you live, I'll bet you will moan and say its a waste of money.

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some People of Britain dont want turbines, or solar panels, they just want money from selling their land or houses. If they build all win turbines around where you live, I'll bet you will moan and say its a waste of money.

They are, in fact, putting up windfarms where I live - not to mention drilling oil/gas wells. I have no problem with windmills. I like them a whole lot better than the belching smokestacks I grew up around. That form of "prosperity" has turned my hometown into "the Rust Belt" and turned a pleasant rural stream (Fields Brook) into a superfund site. I'll take wind any day; at least, you can't smell it 200 miles downwind.

Doug

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Not long ago, I went to the relatively new Perot Science Museum in Dallas. There were some very cool things in there, but since it bears Ross Perot's name it should come as no surprise that there is a heavy "Drill baby drill" feel to parts of it, mainly in the Geology section. There was actually a ride where 21 people get in a capsule, then are transported down into a fracking well. There are video screens that act as windows and the whole capsule shakes and jolts every once in awhile to simulate the ride. At one point they showed a computer simulation of what happens to the surrounding rock during fracking, then they said very confidently that there was no effect on the surface. Given the computer simulation I had just seen, I had to laugh. Humans, even super intelligent ones, can be so stupid sometimes.

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Fractioning is beginning to look like a rescue of the US economy from the mismanagement of its rulers and the present perverse incentives.

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