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Notta Lotta People Know That!


Ealdwita

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"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo"

is the longest grammatically correct sentence in the English language made up of homonyms and homophones...

parsing it out makes the meaning clearer:

the parsed sentence reads as a claim that bison who are intimidated or bullied by bison are themselves intimidating or bullying bison (at least in the city of Buffalo– implicitly, Buffalo, NY):

  1. Buffalo buffalo (buffalo from Buffalo NY) [that] Buffalo buffalo buffalo (that the buffalo from Buffalo NY bully) buffalo Buffalo buffalo (are bullying buffalo from Buffalo NY)
  2. [Those] buffalo(es) from Buffalo [that are intimidated by] buffalo(es) from Buffalo intimidate buffalo(es) from Buffalo.
  3. Bison from Buffalo, New York, who are intimidated by other bison in their community, also happen to intimidate other bison in their community.
  4. The buffalo from Buffalo who are buffaloed by buffalo from Buffalo, buffalo (verb) other buffalo from Buffalo.
  5. Buffalo buffalo (main clause subject) [that] Buffalo buffalo (subordinate clause subject) buffalo (subordinate clause verb) buffalo (main clause verb) Buffalo buffalo (main clause direct object).

Foreigners studying English just love this sort of thing. I will probably spend the rest of the night working it out.

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Foreigners studying English just love this sort of thing. I will probably spend the rest of the night working it out.

to help a bit, the word "buffalo" is a word that means "to confuse" or "to bully" (but not bully in a mean way necessarily) - it's not used much these days...

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to help a bit, the word "buffalo" is a word that means "to confuse" or "to bully" (but not bully in a mean way necessarily) - it's not used much these days...

Thanks but I already know that.
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to help a bit, the word "buffalo" is a word that means "to confuse" or "to bully" (but not bully in a mean way necessarily) - it's not used much these days...

or bluff
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Biro pens were invented by Mr.Biro during the 2nd World War so that Pilots could jot notes on their kneepads while flying

Seems a bit odd since pencils would have done equally well!

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"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo"

is the longest grammatically correct sentence in the English language made up of homonyms and homophones...

parsing it out makes the meaning clearer:

the parsed sentence reads as a claim that bison who are intimidated or bullied by bison are themselves intimidating or bullying bison (at least in the city of Buffalo– implicitly, Buffalo, NY):

  1. Buffalo buffalo (buffalo from Buffalo NY) [that] Buffalo buffalo buffalo (that the buffalo from Buffalo NY bully) buffalo Buffalo buffalo (are bullying buffalo from Buffalo NY)
  2. [Those] buffalo(es) from Buffalo [that are intimidated by] buffalo(es) from Buffalo intimidate buffalo(es) from Buffalo.
  3. Bison from Buffalo, New York, who are intimidated by other bison in their community, also happen to intimidate other bison in their community.
  4. The buffalo from Buffalo who are buffaloed by buffalo from Buffalo, buffalo (verb) other buffalo from Buffalo.
  5. Buffalo buffalo (main clause subject) [that] Buffalo buffalo (subordinate clause subject) buffalo (subordinate clause verb) buffalo (main clause verb) Buffalo buffalo (main clause direct object).

This is very interesting indeed. First of all it is American English and when I first read it it looked like 'homophobes' instead of 'homophones'! :w00t:It seems, according to Wikipedia, the sentence has been discussed in literature since 1972 when it was used by William J. Rapaport, an associate professor at the university at Buffalo. The sentence's meaning becomes clearer when it is understood that it uses three meanings of the word buffalo: the city of Buffalo, New York; the somewhat uncommon verb "to buffalo" (meaning "to bully or intimidate"), as well as the animal buffalo. The meaning becomes clear when synonyms are used: "Buffalo bison that other Buffalo bison bully, themselves bully Buffalo bison."

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Seems a bit odd since pencils would have done equally well!

What if you broke the tip, you wouldn't want to have to sharpen it, would you?

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What if you broke the tip, you wouldn't want to have to sharpen it, would you?

Good point, (no pun intended), I never thought of that! :whistle:

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The Milky Way is in the fridge

The fridge is in the kitchen

The kitchen is in the house

The house is in the street

The street is in the town

The Town is in the country

The country is on the Continent

The Continent Is on Earth

The Earth Is in The Solar System

The Solar System is in The Milkyway

The Milkyway is in the fridge

For those NOT in The UK, a Milkyway is a bar of chocolate!!!

Not a lot of people know that?

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Seems a bit odd since pencils would have done equally well!

the graphite in the pencil went brittle in cold temperatures and used to snap so they needed a pen but all they had was ink pens which used to blot and the ink ran all over the place.
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In the original Mexican flag (1821), the bird in the centre was not an eagle, but a Striated Caracara (Phalcoboenus australis).

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- The "spot" on the 7-Up logo comes from its inventor who had red eyes. He was an albino.

- On average, 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents every day.

- Most lipstick contains fish scales.

- During the California gold rush of 1849, miners sent their laundry to Honolulu for washing and pressing. Due to the extremely high costs in California during these boom years, it was deemed more feasible to send their shirts to Hawaii for servicing.

- If you put a drop of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death.

- Charlie Chaplin once won third prize in a Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest.

- Every year 4 people in the UK die putting their trousers on. (haven't you guys figured out how to do that safely yet?)....

- Title 14, Section 1211 of the Code of Federal Regulations (implemented on July 16, 1969) makes it illegal for U.S. citizens to have any contact with extraterrestrials or their vehicles.

- On a Canadian two-dollar bill, the American flag is flying over the Parliament Building. (Is this still true?)...

- The bestselling books of all time are The Bible (6 billion+), Quotations from the Works of Mao Tse-tung (900 million+), and The Lord of the Rings (100 million+)

- If you feed a seagull Alka-Seltzer, its stomach will explode. (I've seen this happen...)

- Attila the Hun (invader of Europe; 406-453), Felix Faure (French President; 1841-1899), Pope Leo VII (936-939), Pope John VII (955-964), Pope Leo VIII (963-965), Pope John XIII (965-72), Pope Paul II (1467-1471), Lord Palmerston (British Prime Minister, 1784-1865), Nelson Rockefeller (US Vice President, 1908-1979), and John Entwistle (The Who's bassist, 1944-2002) all died while having sex.

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- Every year 4 people in the UK die putting their trousers on. (haven't you guys figured out how to do that safely yet?)....

We, as a nation, tend to get up late, so many men are still getting dressed whilst driving to work.

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In the original Mexican flag (1821), the bird in the centre was not an eagle, but a Striated Caracara (Phalcoboenus australis).

I knew that! :whistle:

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William Shakespeare and Miguel Cervantes ("Don Quioxte") died on the same day, April 23, 1616.

edit: There is a caveat to this...

However, these dates refer to different days: Spain had adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1582, but England was still using the Julian calendar. Shakespeare's death date of 23 April 1616 (Julian) was equivalent to 3 May 1616 (Gregorian). This was ten days after Cervantes was buried and eleven days after he died.

Edited by Taun
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Paranormal experts say people reach the peak of their ability to see ghosts when they're 7 years old.

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The flag of Denmark (The Dannebrog) is believed to be the worlds oldest national flag.

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If you look on the sender IR LED on the front of a remote control device and you press a button, you see nothing.

If you watch to the LED with the screen of your mobile phone cam and press a button on the remote control device, you can see the LED flashing.

Edited by toast
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I haven't been posting very much onto this thread because I've been enjoying everybody else's posts too much. :passifier: Hopefully the following will make up for it.

1. Apples, not caffeine, are more efficient at waking you up in the morning.

How do you filtering that?

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Paranormal experts say people reach the peak of their ability to see ghosts when they're 7 years old.

I've never seen one but I do believe in them.

Edited by Technocrat
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Things have been a bit too quiet here for a while so I thought I'd start the ball rolling again! Maybe you are all too busy preparing for Christmas!

The United Kingdom:

It is illegal for a woman to be topless in public except as a clerk in a tropical fish store.

It is illegal for two adult men to have sex in the same house as a third person.

Any person found breaking a boiled egg at the sharp end will be sentenced to 24 hours in the village stocks, (enacted by Edward VI).

Excluding Sundays, it is perfectly legal to shoot a Scotsman with a bow and arrow.

You may not make out in public.

A bed may not be hung out of a window.

Edited by Technocrat
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Lightning bolts can be hotter than the sun.

So can welding arcs
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The Gloucestershire Regiment....the 'Glorious Glosters'....... wear a badge on both the front and the back of their berets.

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You might enjoy this from Col. D. G. Swinford, USMC, Ret. and history buff. You would really have to dig deep to get this kind of ringside seat to history:

1. The first German serviceman killed in WW II was killed by the Japanese, (China, 1937). The first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians, (Finland, 1940). The highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen. Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps.

2. The youngest US serviceman was 12-year-old Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. His benefits were later restored by act of Congress.

3. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS, (pronounced 'sink us'). The shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the swastika. Hitler's private train was named 'Amerika.' All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

4. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps than the Marine Corps. While completing the required 30 missions, an airman's chance of being killed was 71%.

5. Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese Ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane.

6. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th round with a tracer round to aid in aiming. This was a big mistake. Tracers had different ballistics so, (at long range), if your tracers were hitting the target 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. This was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.

7. When allied armies reached the Rhine, the first thing men did was pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to Winston Churchill, (who made a big show of it), and Gen. Patton, (who had himself photographed in the act).

8. German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City, but they decided it wasn't worth the effort.

9. German submarine U-120 was sunk by a malfunctioning toilet.

10. Among the first 'Germans' captured at Normandy were several Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until they were captured by the Russians and forced to fight for the Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans and forced to fight for the German Army until they were captured by the US Army.

11. Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 United States and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska, in the Aleutian Islands. 21 troops were killed in the assault on the island....... It could have been worse if there had actually been any Japanese on the island.

12. The last marine killed in WW2 was killed by a can of spam. He was on the ground as a POW in Japan when rescue flights dropping food and supplies came over, the package came apart in the air and a stray can of spam hit him and killed him.
Edited by Technocrat
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