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Still Waters

An Octopus Terrorizing Oklahoma's Lakes?

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RedSquirrel

treeocto.jpg

The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. These solitary cephalopods reach an average size (measured from arm-tip to mantle-tip,) of 30-33 cm. Unlike most other cephalopods, tree octopuses are amphibious, spending only their early life and the period of their mating season in their ancestral aquatic environment. Because of the moistness of the rainforests and specialized skin adaptations, they are able to keep from becoming desiccated for prolonged periods of time, but given the chance they would prefer resting in pooled water.

An intelligent and inquisitive being (it has the largest brain-to-body ratio for any mollusk), the tree octopus explores its arboreal world by both touch and sight. Adaptations its ancestors originally evolved in the three dimensional environment of the sea have been put to good use in the spatially complex maze of the coniferous Olympic rainforests. The challenges and richness of this environment (and the intimate way in which it interacts with it,) may account for the tree octopus's advanced behavioral development. (Some evolutionary theorists suppose that "arboreal adaptation" is what laid the groundwork in primates for the evolution of the human mind.)

Reaching out with one of her eight arms, each covered in sensitive suckers, a tree octopus might grab a branch to pull herself along in a form of locomotion called tentaculation; or she might be preparing to strike at an insect or small vertebrate, such as a frog or rodent, or steal an egg from a bird's nest; or she might even be examining some object that caught her fancy, instinctively desiring to manipulate it with her dexterous limbs (really deserving the title "sensory organs" more than mere "limbs",) in order to better know it.

Thank you, I've been fighting for them for years. They are truly majestic.

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qxcontinuum

the cat fish can grow up to 5 meters in europe . They can be very ferocious predators not on;y bottom feeders. Every fisherman knows that!

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joc

the cat fish can grow up to 5 meters in europe . They can be very ferocious predators not on;y bottom feeders. Every fisherman knows that!

Yep. And if one is swimming along and grabs your foot...dude...you are going down.

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Sakari

the cat fish can grow up to 5 meters in europe . They can be very ferocious predators not on;y bottom feeders. Every fisherman knows that!

Yep. And if one is swimming along and grabs your foot...dude...you are going down.

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Taun

Who then, would actually go 'swimming' in a lake like that? Sounds...nasty. I will tell you this much...I grew up in lakes around North East and East Texas...we learned to ski, we learned to swim, we didn't have any 'pools' so...we swam in lakes...But Now..you couldn't pay me to swim in a lake around here or anywhere else. There are no Fresh Water Octopus species...but there are a LOT of alligators in the lakes and rivers...there wasn't when I was a kid. I remember just a few years ago...an eight foot alligator was caught by someone fishing in City Lake Park in McKinney, TX...a tiny lake with a walking path of 1 mile around it...so yeah...alligators in the sewer.

No one swims in Thunderbird... it is for boating and is a campground/picnic area....

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