Jump to content
Unexplained Mysteries uses cookies. By using the site you consent to our use of cookies as per our Cookie Policy.
Close X
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Eldorado

800,000yrs old footprints found in UK

35 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Eldorado

"Scientists have discovered the earliest evidence of human footprints outside of Africa, on the Norfolk Coast in the East of England.

The footprints are more than 800,000 years old and were found on the shores of Happisburgh.

They are direct evidence of the earliest known humans in northern Europe."

Full article & video: http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-26025763

Just thought I'd share.

Link for British Museum project page: http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/research_projects/all_current_projects/featured_project_happisburgh.aspx

Edited by Eldorado
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumpnuts

I feel like there's a joke about the footprints-of-Jesus-on-the-beach picture somewhere in here... I just can't find it. :cry:

Edit: The joke. Not the footprints-of-Jesus-on-the-beach picture.

Edit: Edit: Sex on the Beach!!! (I'm grasping at straws here :no: )

Edited by DumpsterJesus
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Frank Merton

Smart people; they chose a nice place to live.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo

Meh, this isn't a very amazing discovery at all.

It's well known here in the South, that there are many examples of such ancient, primitive humans "oop North". And their footprints (along with other evidences) are everywhere! :whistle:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dark_Grey

This doesn't follow Ken Ham's 'observational science'. They say the footprints are 800,000 years old, but were you actually there to see it? :whistle:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Frank Merton

I would make a wild guess that the shape of the prints put it as the much earlier species.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
avs76

800,000 years - that's amazing! I had no idea humankind was was out of Africa and in Britain that long ago.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stardrive

I would make a wild guess that the shape of the prints put it as the much earlier species.

Homo antecessor.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dumpnuts
Hey, hey now! No name calling!
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mac E

Very cool. And it was backed by evidence for the aging. This was well put together.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mantis914

If there are footprints, perhaps there's other stuff around there to suggest a civilization was around at that time? That looked like an awful lot of footprints...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
blackjack62

looks like a beach party....any empty 6 packs...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ealdwita

800,000 years - that's amazing! I had no idea humankind was was out of Africa and in Britain that long ago.

Actually, there aren't too many humans in Norfolk even now.....

s9471.gif

"Ar ya reet boi?"

My mother's ancestors are 'Yellerbellies' BTW...(In case you thought I was being racist!)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DieChecker

Just read that the prints only lasted about 3 weeks before being washed away by the ocean. You'd think that they could have build a rockpile or something to protect them for much longer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
coolguy

Do they really know they are this old.ld be bull

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
susieice

How can they be there for 800,000 years and then get washed away in 3 weeks? :huh:

Just asking.

Edited by susieice
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo

How can they be there for 800,000 years and then get washed away in 3 weeks? :huh:

Just asking.

They weren't actually washed away, the article was being rather inaccurate in using that particular phrase. They were reburied under sand and sediment by the tide.

Edited by Leonardo
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Frank Merton

The sad thing is that what could be immensely valuable (scientifically) fossils and artifacts are uncovered by erosion and ultimately lost all the time even though people look right at them and don't realize what they are.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
garyse7

I have a footprint on a rock that I found in our garden, our grandsons foor fits perfectly into the impression, you can even count the toes.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EllJay

I bet the man who made that footprint didn't expect that it would echo through history.

I also find it amazing that they have found footprints from dinosaurs in hardened mud. It would be kinda mindblowing standing by that footprint and imagine that a dinosaur ran just here over some 200 million years ago.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DieChecker

How can they be there for 800,000 years and then get washed away in 3 weeks? :huh:

Just asking.

They weren't actually washed away, the article was being rather inaccurate in using that particular phrase. They were reburied under sand and sediment by the tide.

Here is the article I read...

http://www.latimes.c...y#axzz2shj9WjCg

The researchers knew the prints would not last long. They had been preserved for hundreds of millennia only because they had been buried deep beneath the cliffs that line the beach. But the cliffs are eroding rapidly, and as they wash into the sea, they are uncovering earlier sediments at their base. The footprints were in one of these sediments, but now that they were exposed to the ocean waves, they would swiftly erode.

Over the next two weeks the team used photogrammetry and laser scanning techniques to produce a 3D record of 152 of the mysterious hollows. From these methods they were able to see that the impressions were elongated like a foot. They were even able to spot what looked like toe marks.

In the paper, the researchers say the footprints could not have been made by recent activity, because the sediment is now too compact and not squishy enough to make a footprint.

Just three weeks after they were discovered, the ancient footprints were gone, washed away by the sea.

But the record of the prints remains, and, there is always hope that as the cliffs continue to deteriorate, new footprints from the distant past will emerge.

It sounds to me like these footprints were in hard clay, not stone. So the waves eroded them away.

Edited by DieChecker
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Leonardo

Here is the article I read...

http://www.latimes.c...y#axzz2shj9WjCg

It sounds to me like these footprints were in hard clay, not stone. So the waves eroded them away.

If you watch the video in the OP, you'll see the footprints were below the tide mark - not recently exposed from a cliff-face. The scientist who discovered them then went back to that spot after the footprints were recovered by sand.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stardrive

That was my take on it also Leo. But it seems there might be a discrepancy because the news headline title, in DC's link, is : "800,000-year-old footprints found in England -- then they washed away". Where is that missing piece to the puzzle when you need it?......

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eldorado

Guys....

"In May 2013 a team of scientists led by the British Museum, Natural History Museum and Queen Mary University of London discovered a series of footprints left by early humans in ancient estuary muds over 800,000 years ago at Happisburgh in Norfolk.

The discovery was made on the foreshore at low tide where heavy seas had removed the beach sand to reveal the normally flat estuarine muds. But in one area a series of elongated hollows were cut into the compacted silts. It was only after recording the surface through photogrammetry, a technique that stitches together digital photographs to create a 3D record, that confirmed these were indeed ancient human footprints.

Within two weeks the prints had eroded away, but analyses of the digital images show in some cases the heel, arch and even toes of a range of adults and children." (emphasis mine)

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/research_projects/all_current_projects/featured_project_happisburgh/happisburgh_footprints.aspx

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.